Health

Mental health experts don’t have a clear picture of how COVID has affected Oklahoma’s already high youth suicide rate, but they fear the pandemic has increased it.

For 2019, Oklahoma’s youth suicide rate was about double the national average, but preliminary data shows a slight decline in 2020. In a regular state survey of sixth through 12th grade students, however, one in 10 of the 89,000 kids who completed it said they attempted suicide in the past 12 months.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

County sheriffs told Oklahoma lawmakers during an interim study they need them to do more to improve the state’s mental health system. 

Local mental health professionals are seeing the same problem as hospitals at this point in the COVID-19 pandemic: too many patients.

Laureate Psychiatric Hospital and Clinic psychiatrist Dr. Scott Moseman said in his experience, a lot of the need for treatment stems from growing stress on families with kids in school, but there aren’t enough mental health providers to go around.

Our guest is Dr. Jillian Horton, a medical educator, writer, musician, and podcaster based in Canada. As an award-winning teacher of mindfulness, she works with doctors at all stages of their careers who are dealing with guilt, grief, burnout, frustration, and/or other professional pressures. Dr.

Why do human beings sweat? And what other animals on this planet sweat, and why do they do it? Are there health benefits to sweating? Our guest is Sarah Everts, a science writer who has written for Scientific American, Smithsonian, New Scientist, and other publications, and who teaches journalism at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.

What is the Delta Variant, and how is it related to the novel Coronavirus? What exactly do we know about the rapid spread of the Delta Variant now happening in Tulsa County -- and across our state? And what's the relationship between this rate of spreading and Oklahoma's relatively low vaccination rate? Are there other Coronavirus variants out there -- either here in the US or worldwide? And when will American kids under the age of 12 be allowed to get vaxxed? Our guests on ST Medical Monday are Dr. Bruce Dart, Executive Director of the Tulsa Health Department, and Dr.

OU

The OU College of Dentistry will open a state-of-the art clinic in Tulsa.

The roughly 5,000-square foot facility on the OU-Tulsa campus is expected to open in June 2022 and will be the first of several planned across the state.

Dr. Raymond Cohlmia is dean of the OU College of Dentistry. He said the new clinics are meant to address a lack of access to affordable, comprehensive care in Oklahoma, not to just churn out additional dentists and hygienists.

Our guest is Dr. Adam Stern, a psychiatrist at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He is also an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and he joins us to discuss his new memoir, a candid, often moving reflection on his residency at Harvard. Per this starred summary of the book in Kirkus Reviews: "[A] dynamic debut memoir....

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Uma Naidoo. She's a board-certified psychiatrist (Harvard Medical School), a professional chef (Cambridge School of Culinary Arts), and a nutrition specialist (Cornell University). She's currently the Director of Nutritional and Lifestyle Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, and she joins us to talk about her bestselling new book, "This Is Your Brain on Food." As noted by Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard University: "Dr.

(Note: This discussion first aired back in March.) Our guest is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

Wikipedia user Vegasjon

The Oklahoma Blood Institute is urging potential donors to give immediately with blood supplies down to an emergency low level.

Donations haven’t fully recovered to pre-pandemic levels, and OBI is now seeing its typical summer lull in donations ahead of a holiday weekend where an increase in trauma cases could cause blood demand to spike.

Executive Director Jan Laub said there’s a one-day supply available right now, and sometimes it’s less than that.

Death is something very few of like to talk about, or even think about, but it's a fact of life, after all -- the final fact of life, you might say. What if we could live our lives while looking at death in a more complete, more honest, less fearful way? Would our lives be richer? And would we actually be healthier individuals? Our guest, Barbara Becker, clearly and intelligently answers these questions in the affirmative.

When the documentary film "Period. End of Sentence." won an Oscar in 2019, the film's co-producer, Melissa Berton, said in her acceptance speech: "A period should end a sentence, not a girl's education." Now comes a new book that follows-up on that goundbreaking movie, a far-reaching book that outlines the challenges confronting those who menstruate worldwide and the solutions being offered by a new generation of body-positive activists and innovators. Our guest is the author of this work, Anita Diamant.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're talking about the science and strategies of composting -- and why it's good for our planet, and why it's good for us (mentally as well as physically). It's estimated that 1/3 of all the world'd prepared food materials go to waste -- and/or simply get thrown away -- so it's not surprising that composting is now becoming more and more popular among individuals and businesses alike.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Becky Wilcox, PT, MPT, PRPC, who was the first person in Oklahoma to be recognized (back in 2014) as a Certified Pelvic Rehab Practitioner; you can find her full bio here. A key part of the team at Physical Therapy of Tulsa, Wilcox is local expert on pelvic floor dysfunction, which is a broad term referring to a number of disorders that can occur when pelvic floor muscles or ligaments are injured.

(Note: This show first aired back in March.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saray Stancic. In 1995, she learned that she had multiple sclerosis. By 2003, she was walking regularly with a cane, had stopped nearly all unnecessary physical activity, and was on several medications. Flash forward to 2010, when she ran a marathon.... How'd she do this? It didn't happen overnight, of course, but -- through a series of dedicated lifestyle changes -- it did happen. Dr.

We are joined on ST Medical Monday by Dr. Shantanu Nundy, a primary care physician, technologist, and business leader who serves as Chief Medical Officer for Accolade, which provides technology-enabled health services to Fortune 500 companies as well as small businesses. Dr.

Lt. Gov. Matt Pinnell is helping to lead a new push to improve the health of the youngest Oklahomans.

Pinnell announced the new Healthy Kid campaign Thursday during the Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy’s virtual luncheon.

(Note: This show first aired early last year.) On this edition of StudioTulsa, we meet investigative journalist John Carreyrou, a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter with The Wall Street Journal. He broke the story of the fraud perpetrated by the medical tech company known as Theranos and its charismatic young CEO, Elizabeth Holmes. That story is the basis of his book, "Bad Blood," which he tells us about.

Our guest is Herman Pontzer, an Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University and Associate Research Professor of Global Health at the Duke Global Health Institute. An well-known researcher in human energetics and evolution, he joins us to discuss his new book, "Burn: New Research Blows the Lid Off How We Really Burn Calories, Lose Weight, and Stay Healthy." The book draws on Pontzer's groundbreaking studies with hunter-gatherer tribes in order to show how exercise actually **doesn't** increase our metabolism.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Additional coronavirus variants have been identified in Oklahoma since health officials started to ramp up sequencing work at a new public health lab.

The presence of P.1 and B.1.1.7 variants was previously known. There are now also the B.1.427 and B.1.429 strains from California, and B.1.351, currently the dominant strain in South Africa.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is journalist and author Larry Olmsted, who tells us about his latest book, "Fans: How Watching Sports Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Understanding." The book cites a wide range of new and recent studies on the topic of sports fandom, thus arguing that the more we root for a given sports team, the better our social, psychological, and physical health is likely to be -- and the more meaningful our personal relationships will be, and the more connected and happier we will feel overall.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. T. Colin Campbell, who has been for more than four decades a leading expert on nutrition research in American medicine. His bestselling book from several years ago, "The China Study," grew out of the most comprehensive study of health and nutrition ever conducted, which he led. Dr. Campbell joins us to discuss both his pioneering career and his newest book, "The Future of Nutrition: An Insider's Look at the Science, Why We Keep Getting It Wrong, and How to Start Getting It Right."

Our guest is Dr. Ina Park, who's an associate professor at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, a Medical Consultant at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Division of STD Prevention), and the Medical Director of the California Prevention Training Center.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're looking at the connections between diet, weight control, and health.

Our guest is Dr. Michael Roizen, the bestselling author and Chief Wellness Officer at the Cleveland Clinic. He's also the co-author of "The What to Eat When Cookbook," which is just out, and which builds upon a previous (and very popular) guidebook that he co-wrote called "What to Eat When." In both volumes, Dr. Roizen points out that **when** we eat (that is, what time of day) is actually crucial to the link between a healthy diet and healthy living. It's also crucial to disease prevention, better overall mental/physical performance, and a longer life. As Dr.

Our guest is the author and doctor Michael Stein, who's also a professor of health law, policy, and management at Boston University. He tells us about his new book, which presents the many various moving, sobering, genuine, and often heartbreaking accounts of his patients about money...and about having (or not having) enough money to simply get by in the U.S. today. "Broke" gives us the words and thoughts of those now facing the reality of having to choose between getting medical treatments or paying their bills. As was noted of this book by Dr.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dawn Mauricio, who's been practicing and studying vipassanā meditation since 2005, and who now works as a meditation retreat teacher. (You'll find her online at dawnmauricio.com.) She joins us to discuss her new book, "Mindfulness Meditation for Beginners: 50 Meditations to Practice Awareness, Acceptance, and Peace." As was noted of this book by Jack Kornfield, the author of "A Path with Heart": "[This is] an elegantly simple, wise, and practical approach to mindfulness.

A high-sodium diet can be a deadly diet -- high levels of sodium have been linked to high blood pressure, strokes, and heart attacks. And yet, salt is everywhere. It's all but inescapable on the American foodscape; salt (and plenty of it) is in packaged foods, fast foods, canned foods, table-service restaurants, etc. So...why hasn't salt received the sort of public attention and regulatory action that sugar and fat have? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Michael Jacobson, who set out to answer this question.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Benjamin Lorr, a writer based in New York City. He tells us about his interesting new book, "The Secret Life of Groceries: The Dark Miracle of the American Supermarket." As Lorr writes in the Introduction for this work: "This book is about the grocery store. About the people who work there and the routes of supply that define it. It is the product of five years of research, hundreds of interviews, and thousands of hours tracking down and working alongside the buyers, brokers, marketers, and managers whose lives and choices define our diet.

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