Jim Inhofe

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The wheels are turning on a plan to designate U.S. 412 an interstate.

Sen. Jim Inhofe's legislation to designate the highway an interstate from I-35 in Noble County to I-49 in Springdale, Arkansas, is included in the surface transportation reauthorization bill recently passed out of a Senate committee. Oklahoma Secretary of Transportation Tim Gatz said interstate designation would be a big deal for Tulsa.

Chris Polansky / KWGS News

Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) told a conservative group on Wednesday that he believes there are two main threats to the American electoral system: Democrats pushing to move from the Electoral College to a national popular vote in presidential races; and Republicans who are delegitimizing the Constitution by objecting to Electoral College results.

Chris Polansky / KWGS News

Oklahoma's senior U.S. Senator, Jim Inhofe, visited the Tulsa Fallen Officers' Memorial at the Tulsa Police Academy Friday to recognize National Police Week and announce legislation that would provide federal funding to help train law enforcement officers in dealing with individuals experiencing mental illness.

"There's a lot of opposition to law enforcement," Inhofe said. "It's just unbelievable that there is. We thought we would get out where people could see us and really understand what this is all about."

Trump Campaign

A plan to dedicate a stretch of state highway in Cimarron County "President Donald J. Trump Highway" hit a speed bump this week.

With an omnibus highway dedication bill up for a floor vote, Oklahoma City Democratic Sens. Kay Floyd and Carri Hicks pointed out under state law, most people must have been dead three years before they’re honored with a highway dedication.

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Local and federal authorities are investigating a bomb scare at U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe’s Tulsa offices.

There was a series of emails mentioning explosives along with Inhofe’s Tulsa and D.C. offices. The Robert W. Davis Tower near 21st Street and Utica Avenue was evacuated before noon Tuesday, and the Tulsa Police bomb squad searched the building, including Inhofe’s offices, with sniffer dogs for about half an hour.

No explosive devices were found.

TPD, the U.S. Capitol Police and the FBI are determining who sent the emails.

U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee

A top official at the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality testified before a U.S. Senate committee Wednesday that climate change threatens water system infrastructure across the country. 

U.S. Department of Justice

While the majority of Senate Republicans voted Wednesday against the confirmation of Merrick Garland to serve as President Joe Biden's attorney general, Oklahoma's Jim Inhofe and James Lankford broke ranks and joined Democrats to vote in favor.

Lankford's office declined comment and Inhofe's office did not return a request for comment on the 70-30 vote. In a Facebook Live video posted Wednesday evening, though, Lankford discussed nominations, generally.

Sen. Jim Inhofe

In separate statements over the weekend, Oklahoma's two Republican senators slammed the Saturday Senate passage of President Joe Biden's COVID-19 relief bill. 

Sen. Jim Inhofe

Oklahoma Sens. James Lankford and Jim Inhofe, both Republicans, voted Saturday to acquit former Republican President Donald Trump at the close of his impeachment trial for the insurrection he incited at the U.S. Capitol on January 6th.

"I cannot support removing someone from office who is no longer in office. An impeachment trial after someone has left office is unconstitutional," Lankford tweeted.

Sen. James Lankford

Oklahoma Sens. James Lankford and Jim Inhofe were among the 44 Senate Republicans who voted again Tuesday to declare former-President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial unconstitutional.

"You cannot vote to remove someone from office who is not even in office. This is nonsense and sets a terrible precedent for the future," Lankford wrote on Twitter.

Sen. Jim Inhofe

Oklahoma Republican Sens. Jim Inhofe and James Lankford expressed displeasure early Friday morning after Vice President Kamala Harris cast a tie-breaking vote to pass a budget resolution that would allow passage of President Joe Biden's $1.9 COVID relief package on a simple majority vote.

Sen. James Lankford

Oklahoma Sens. James Lankford and Jim Inhofe, both Republican, voted Tuesday against proceeding with a Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump for his role in inciting the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Lankford and Inhofe were on the losing side of a 55-45 vote on a procedural point of order raised by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) to declare the trial of a former president unconstitutional.

U.S. Senate

Oklahoma's two U.S. Senators, Republicans James Lankford and Jim Inhofe, participated in committee confirmation hearings Tuesday for several of President-elect Joe Biden's Cabinet nominees. 

Inhofe, who chairs the Senate Armed Services Committee, questioned retired Army Gen. Lloyd Austin, Biden's nominee for secretary of defense, about several policy priorities including the U.S. nuclear triad and American military operations in Africa. He also commented on Austin's recent retirement from the Army and the subsequent need for a Congressional waiver to serve in the civilian post.

Office of Sen. Jim Inhofe

Oklahoma's senior U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe said in a Tuesday statement that he will not join fellow Republican Okla. Sen. James Lankford and other Republicans in objecting to the certification of Democratic President-elect Joe Biden's victory in a joint session of Congress on Wednesday.

Office of Sen. Jim Inhofe

Despite the Electoral College's formal vote confirming President-elect Joe Biden's victory over incumbent President Donald Trump in the November election, Oklahoma's two U.S. Senators are not among the growing ranks of Senate Republicans acknowledging that reality.

Twitter / @jsdelpilar

The office of Gov. Kevin Stitt is keeping silent following reports the governor flew out of Will Rogers Airport on Wednesday.

FOX23 reporter Jackie DelPilar tweeted photos Thursday purported to show Stitt not fully wearing a mask while flying to Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas. 

Facebook / Sen. Jim Inhofe

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is closing out his relationship with Congress with one more power jab, threatening to veto a hugely popular defense bill unless lawmakers clamp down on big tech companies he claims were biased against him during the election.

Trump is demanding that Congress repeal so-called Section 230, a part of the communications code that shields Twitter, Facebook and others from content liability. His complaint is a battle cry of conservatives — and some Democrats — who say the social media giants treat them unfairly.

Office of Sen. Jim Inhofe

While not yet acknowledging President Trump's defeat in the election, Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said Wednesday that President-elect Joe Biden should receive daily intelligence briefings pending certification of election results.

Lankford said that was appropriate in 2000 when legal challenges were in progress for weeks following Election Day in the contest between Vice President Al Gore and eventual-President George W. Bush, and is appropriate now, even as the Trump campaign challenges election results in various courts.

Facebook / Sen. Jim Inhofe

Recently re-elected Oklahoma U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe paid a virtual visit to the Tulsa Rotary Club this week and spent some time talking about last week’s election.

Inhofe described the presidential election as "not a done deal" and was then asked by a reporter what evidence there is to support claims of voter fraud.

Courtesy Sam Vicent Davis (Twitter @samanthavicent)

The Republican Party of Tulsa County is defending its decision to hold a large, indoor event earlier this week on the evening of Election Day, even as COVID-19 infections and deaths are surging and as local health officials and hospital leaders are pleading with county residents to take more responsibility to avoid spreading the novel coronavirus.

Oklahoma's congressional delegation is entirely Republican once again.

In one of the most-watched races of the 2020 election, Oklahoma Republican U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe won re-election and got one of the earliest calls of the night from the Associated Press.

Right around 7 p.m., the AP called the race for Inhofe over Democratic challenger Abby Broyles, before any Election Day results had even come in.

At his Tulsa watch party, Inofe predicted Republicans would hold the Senate.

Twitter / @JimInhofe

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — President Donald Trump and Republican U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe both coasted to easy victories Tuesday in deep-red Oklahoma.

Inhofe, 85, a fixture in Oklahoma politics for 50 years, was heavily favored to win his fifth term in office. He defeated Democrat Abby Broyles, 31, an Oklahoma City lawyer and former television reporter, along with a Libertarian and two independents.

Broyles, who was making her first run at political office, painted Inhofe as an out-of-touch Washington insider who is no longer up to the job.

Office of Sen. Jim Inhofe

Oklahoma's U.S. Senators, Republicans James Lankford and Jim Inhofe, met separately this week with Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump's nominee to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the U.S. Supreme Court. Both men say they support Barrett's confirmation.

In a new ad, Oklahoma Republican U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe continues to use rhetoric about a socialist takeover and suggests Democratic opponent Abby Broyles’ political views aren’t Oklahoman and that she should run for Senate in a different state.

Wikipedia

Oklahoma U.S. Senators Jim Inhofe and James Lankford have issued statements saying there should be a vote on President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

The senators issued separate statements saying because Republicans control the White House and the Senate, it’s different than it was four years ago, when the Republican-controlled Senate refused to hold a hearing for 293 days on President Barack Obama’s nominee for the Court, Merrick Garland.

Office of Sen. James Lankford

Oklahoma's U.S. Senators, Republicans Jim Inhofe and James Lankford, blamed Democrats as the most recent coronavirus relief proposal failed to reach enough votes to survive a filibuster.

"Disappointed, but not surprised Senate Democrats blocked our targeted COVID-19 relief bill," Lankford said in a statement. "Only in Washington, D.C., would a $300 billion dollar piece of legislation be considered 'skinny', not even mentioning the $3 trillion we've already spent. We shouldn't continue spending money just because we can, we have to focus on what's needed."

Facebook / Sen. Jim Inhofe

Following reporting in the Tulsa World that Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK) falsely claimed on Wednesday that demonstrators in Portland, Ore., were "killing" people, a spokesperson for the senator said they were not familiar with his thinking or what he may have meant.

Twitter / @JimInhofe

Oklahoma's senior United States senator said Thursday that allegations of ethics violations made by the state Democratic party were unfounded.

"Yet again, the only thing the Democrats can come up with are false attacks against me," Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) said in an emailed statement provided by a spokesperson for his reelection campaign. "They won’t distract me from doing my only job: protecting Oklahoma families from a radical liberal agenda.”

Inhofe Press Office

The New York Times has obtained a recording of a phone call between President Trump and Oklahoma U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe this week in which they discuss keeping the name of at least one Confederate leader on a military base.

"We’re going to keep the name of Robert E. Lee," Trump said on the call.

"Just trust me, I’ll make it happen," Inhofe replied.

President Trump tweeted Friday morning he has Oklahoma U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe’s assurance that when the National Defense Authorization Act reaches his desk, it will not include a provision to remove confederate leaders’ names from military installations.

Inhofe confirmed to the Oklahoman he would work to remove the provision.

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