San Francisco

Our guest is the esteemed pianist, Robin Sutherland, who's known for his long, well-regarded tenure with the San Francisco Symphony. He'll join the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra onstage on Saturday night, the 16th, in a concert led by Gerhardt Zimmermann. Sutherland will perform Mozart's Piano Concerto in C Minor; also on the program will be works by Berlioz and Lutoslawski. More information, including ticket details, is posted here.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. B.J. Miller, whose TED Talk entitled "What Really Matters at The End of Life" has had more than 9 million views. He's also the co-author of a newly released book, "A Beginner's Guide to the End: Practical Advice for Living Life and Facing Death." Dr. Miller -- one of the nation's pre-eminent speakers on patient-centered care, palliative treatment, and end-of-life care -- tells us about his new book: how and why he created it, and what he hopes to accomplish with it. Please note that Dr.

(Please note: This interview first aired last year.) Our guest is Vanessa Hua, a columnist at the San Francisco Chronicle, who joins us to discuss her debut novel, "A River of Stars." It's a powerful and moving saga of modern-day motherhood, immigration, and identity in which a pregnant Chinese woman makes her way to California (i.e., Los Angeles, and then San Francisco's Chinatown) in pursuit of the American dream.

Our guest is Vanessa Hua, a columnist at the San Francisco Chronicle, who joins us to discuss her debut novel, "A River of Stars: A Novel." It's a powerful and moving saga of modern-day motherhood, immigration, and identity in which a pregnant Chinese woman makes her way to California (i.e., Los Angeles, and then San Francisco's Chinatown) in pursuit of the American dream. Per USA Today: "Hua's story spins with wild fervor, with charming protagonists fiercely motivated by maternal and survival instincts."

We offer a chat with Donald MacDonald, a San Francisco-based architect with 40+ years of experience in architecture, planning, contract documents, and construction management. He was the major architect of the Bay Bridge's Eastern span, redesigned elements of the Golden Gate Bridge, and has designed bridges across the U.S. as well as internationally -- and he also, way back when, studied with famed architect Bruce Goff at the University of Oklahoma.

What makes for the creation of a structural or architectural icon? Is it strictly a matter of design? Or do both design and engineering play a role? And what about the location or environment surrounding a given structure --- how might they be involved? We explore such questions with our guest, Donald MacDonald, the noted bridge architect. Born in Canada and based for many years in San Francisco, MacDonald has designed high-rise buildings, landmark homes, and even an earthquake-proof bed.

(Please note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest on ST is Dr. Victoria Sweet, an Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and a prize-winning historian. Dr. Sweet practiced medicine for twenty years at Laguna Honda Hospital in San Francisco --- and she's just published a book about this remarkable facility, and about her time there, and, indeed, about the state of health care in America today.

Our guest on ST is Dr. Victoria Sweet, an Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and a prize-winning historian. Dr. Sweet practiced medicine for twenty years at Laguna Honda Hospital in San Francisco --- and she's just published a book about this remarkable facility, and about her time there, and, indeed, about the state of health care in America today. This new book, just out from Riverhead Trade, is called "God's Hotel: A Doctor, a Hospital, and a Pilgrimage to the Heart of Medicine." As we read of this book (and of this place) at Dr.