Nature Writing

Our guest is the award-winning British author and journalist William Atkins, whose new book -- a dense and engrossing blend of history, memoir, geography, and travel writing -- is called "The Immeasurable World: Journeys in Desert Places." It's a work that, per The Wall Street Journal, "courts comparisons with the capaciously learned nature writing of John McPhee. But there's also an open-ended spiritual quest to Mr.

Our guest is Roger Thompson, a Tulsa native and nonfiction writer who also directs the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Formerly, Thompson was a wilderness canoe guide in Minnesota; later on, he founded an environmental program in Banff, Alberta, Canada. His newest book, which he told us about recently while visiting Tulsa, grew directly out his longtime appreciation of outdoor exploration.

If you grew up here in the Sooner State -- and if you are, as they say, of a certain age -- then you might well wonder where all the Texas horned lizards, or horned toads, or horny toads, have gone.... Whatever you call them, they used to be readily apparent all over these parts, or so it seemed -- but no longer. What happened? Our guest is Chad Love, a freelance writer and editor based in Woodward, Oklahoma.

Late one night in 2011, a large animal collided with an SUV on a Connecticut parkway. This animal was not a deer -- as is, sadly, so often the case. It was a 140-pound mountain lion...and it had been born in the Black Hills of South Dakota...in 2009!