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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

State Breaks 3,000, Tulsa County Breaks 500 COVID Deaths

The Oklahoma State Department of Health reported on Tuesday 1,558 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state's total to 358,374. Tulsa County had 380 of Tuesday's cases. Its total now stands at 58,851, second to Oklahoma County's 69,587. The state's seven-day average of new cases, which shows the trend in infections, fell below 3,000 for the first time since Jan. 1, dropping from 3,081 to 2,988. The record of 4,256 was set last Wednesday. The average had dipped to around 2,600 as reporting...

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Courtesy Tulsa Health Department

Dart Gets First Vaccine Dose

Tulsa Health Department Executive Director Dr. Bruce Dart received his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Friday. “We know that this vaccine is safe and effective, and we know that COVID can be a very serious illness for many people – and I don’t want to get sick. I encourage everybody to also get this vaccine,” said Dart. In a press release, THD said Dart registered through the Oklahoma State Department of Health's vaccine portal and made his appointment as a qualifying member of "Phase 2...

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Ken Burns Says U.S. Has 3 Viruses: COVID-19, White Supremacy And Misinformation

Filmmaker Ken Burns has spent his career documenting American history, and he always considered three major crises in the nation's past: the Civil War, the Depression and World War II. Then came the unprecedented "perfect storm" of 2020 — and Burns thinks we may be living through America's fourth great crisis, and perhaps the worst one yet. "We're beset by three viruses, are we not?" he explains. There's "a year-old COVID-19 virus, but also a 402-year-old virus of white supremacy, of racial...

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StudioTulsa

(Note: This interview first aired last fall.) Our guest is Harold McGee, who writes about the science of food and cooking. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Nose Dive: A Field Guide to the World's Smells." As was noted of this work by Booklist: "In his detailed survey of scents, food writer and cooking scientist McGee elegantly explains olfaction.... His exploration of our smelly world includes the odors of flora and fauna, soil and smoke, food and fragrances, but also the unexpected: primordial earth, rain, and the whiff of old books.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're looking at the connections between diet, weight control, and health.

On this edition of ST, we chat with artist and Living Arts of Tulsa board member Tina Henley, who is the curator for an interesting group show now on view at Living Arts called "Project Hope, Unity, and Compassion." On view through the 22nd, it is a collection of large-scale artworks which were created on plywood last summer by various artists, and which were then used to cover store-fronts, windows, and buildings in advance of the Trump rally at the BOK Center.

Our guest on ST is Adam Jentleson, the public affairs director at Democracy Forward and a former deputy chief of staff to Senator Harry Reid. Jentleson joins us to discuss his new book, which argues that far from reflecting the intent and design of the Founding Fathers, the U.S. Senate -- from John C. Calhoun in the mid-1800s up through Mitch McConnell today -- has been transformed by a tenacious, often extremist minority of white conservatives. Per The New York Times: "An impeccably timed book....

Our guest is Tamara Payne, who's the primary researcher and co-author (along with her late father, the esteemed investigative journalist Les Payne) of "The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X." The recipient of the 2020 National Book Award, this biography draws upon countless interviews in order to contextualize Malcolm's life not only within the Nation of Islam but also within the broader sweep of modern American history.

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File Photo of Big Splash Entrance

Tulsa, OK – Boy, 6, nearly drowns at Tulsa water park

TULSA, Okla. (AP) A 6-year-old boy is in serious condition after a near drowning at a Tulsa water park.

Medics responded about 5:40 p.m. yesterday to the Big Splash Water Park in Tulsa.

Emergency Medical Services Authority spokeswoman Tina Wells says medics provided life support care to the boy at the park and then transported him in serious condition to a Tulsa hospital.

The boy's name was not immediately released.

Tulsa City Council

Tulsa, OK – 2 Tulsa councilors suggest cut in their pay

TULSA, Okla. (AP) With the city of Tulsa planning to give city employees unpaid days off to make up a revenue shortfall two city councilors say they should give up part of their salaries.

Councilors David Patrick and Dennis Troyer say the council should show solidarity with city workers facing up to eight unpaid furlough days. The councilors say eight unpaid days off would equal a 3.1 percent pay cut and they believe the council should share the pain.

KWGS News

Tulsa, OK – The Tulsa Drillers will move downtown to the new Oneok Field at Greenwood and Archer in Tulsa. The new stadium is under construction. The area is known as America's Black Wall Street, the site of Tulsa's 1921 race riot.

The area can best be described as urban plight. There is litter on the ground and graffiti scars on nearby buildings and the expressway walls. This week, city crews, civic leaders and the Tulsa Drillers picked up the trash and painted over the graffiti.

Congressman Sullivan

Tulsa, OK – 44-year-old Tulsa Congressman John Sullivan (R) today announced via a news release that he has sought help from the Betty Ford Clinic for an alcohol addiction.

"Last night, I checked myself in to the Betty Ford Center in California to treat my addiction to alcohol.

Tulsa, OK –

TULSA, Okla. (AP) Mayor Kathy Taylor is continuing to make cuts to the $578 million budget plan she has proposed to the city council.

Taylor's top administrators are telling councilors that city employees now could face up to eight furlough days, a number that started at four and then increased to six.

City Finance Director Mike Kier says eight furlough days would practically amount to a 3.1 percent salary reduction for each of Tulsa's 4,000 employees. It would save the city $5.2 million.

KWGS News

Broken Arrow, OK – BROKEN ARROW, Okla. (AP) Administrators of a private high school say plummeting enrollment caused by the economic slowdown has led to their decision to close its doors.

Grace Christian High School had 100 students enrolled this past year, but Superintendent Ken Stewart says that only 48 students had enrolled by the end of March for the upcoming school year.

Stewart says many students couldn't afford the tuition payments, which had not been a problem in previous years.

KWGS

Tulsa, OK – Welcome to the Mayo.

Downtown at 115 West 5th Street, the hotel was built in 1925 and was once the tallest building in Oklahoma. It has always been among the grandest.

Oklahoma City, OK – Report: Substance abuse costly to state budget

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) A national study shows that Oklahoma spent nearly 12 percent of its state budget in 2005 on costs connected to substance abuse and addiction.

The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University in New York released its study today.

The report shows Oklahoma spent less than 1 percent of its budget during the same year on substance abuse prevention, treatment and research.

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