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"The Last Million: Europe's Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War"

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Aired on September, September 24th.

Our guest is David Nasaw, the bestselling author and noted historian who, until last year, served as the Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Professor of History at the CUNY Graduate Center. He joins us to discuss his new book, "The Last Million: Europe's Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War." It offers a far-reaching history of the one million refugees left behind in Germany after WWII, a disparate group that Nasaw refers to as "the last million." As explained in this careful documentation of postwar displacement and statelessness, the fate of "the last million" has been largely unknown, or hidden, until now. Indeed, by 1952, these people were widely scattered around the world. But how and why did this diaspora come about, and how did this diaspora affect the Cold War? As per a starred review of this book in Library Journal: "Nasaw does a masterful job of bringing to light the lasting individual and global consequences of policies and attitudes surrounding 'the last million'.... A thought-provoking, highly recommended perspective on a complex and largely overlooked people and period of modern history."

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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