Race and Society in America

We've heard often about "essential workers" since the pandemic got underway -- those indispensable individuals who are, alas, in many cases under-appreciated, under-paid, or both. But such vital workers are not, of course, just those working in the medical, science, health, or rescue fields, and these workers were certainly an important part of American society **before** the pandemic ever hit. Our guest is the New York-based author and journalist Eyal Press.

(Note: This conversation originally aired earlier this year.) History is one thing; mythology is another. And at times, of course, these two can overlap, or blur, or get confused. Such is the case with the Alamo, as our guest argues. Longtime journalist Chris Tomlinson is a columnist for The Houston Chronicle and The San Antonio Express-News, and he's one of the authors of a book titled "Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth." As was noted of this work in Publishers Weekly: "Substantive yet wryly humorous....

Our guest is Carlos Moreno, a Tulsa-based graphic designer, researcher, and freelance writer who originally hails from California, and who's been living and working in Tulsa since the 1990s. Moreno joins us to discuss his new book, "The Victory of Greenwood." This volume presents a novel and engrossing history of Tulsa's Greenwood community by offering more than 20 different biographical portraits of such key "Black Wall Street" figures as John and Loula Williams, B.C. Franklin, the Rev. Ben H. Hill, Edwin McCabe, George Monroe, and various others.

(Note: This conversation first aired back in April.) Our guest on StudioTulsa is Dr. Fern L. Johnson, a Senior Research Scholar and Professor Emerita at Clark University who focuses on race and culture. She and her partner, Marlene G.

History is one thing, and mythology is another. And at times, of course, these two can overlap, or blur, or get confused in a big way. Such is the case with the Alamo, as our guest argues on ST. Longtime journalist Chris Tomlinson is a columnist for The Houston Chronicle and The San Antonio Express-News, and he's one of the authors of an attention-grabbing new book titled "Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth." As was noted of this wotk in Publishers Weekly: "Substantive yet wryly humorous....

On today's ST, we are discussing a new book on race relations and American history that offers a bold, thorough, and eye-opening critique of our nation's criminal justice apparatus, its police operations, and indeed its entire legal system. Our guest is the well-regarded historian Elizabeth Hinton, who is an associate professor of history and African American studies at Yale University as well as a professor of law at Yale Law School.

Library of Congress (American National Red Cross Photograph Collection)

The Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921 injured souls, claimed lives, ruined property, and demolished an entire community. Indeed, the damage suffered by the Black citizens of Greenwood took on many forms -- and this suffering went on for decades. Is it possible even to calculate the economic loss that Greenwood endured due to this terrible tragedy, and if so, how could such a tally be arrived at? As the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre approaches, many are wondering about these questions. Our guest is Jason Long, an economic historian at Wheaton College.

On this edition of ST, we are discussing a book that first appeared as a small, privately-printed volume back in 1923 -- it's an extremely important, frequently cited, and quite special book in that it offers a rare, first-hand account of the Tulsa Race Massacre. Written by one Mary Parrish, a journalist and teacher, the book is "The Nation Must Awake: My Witness to the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921." In the opening pages of the text, we learn that Parrish was reading in her home in Tulsa's Greenwood neighborhood when the massacre began on the evening of May 31, 1921.

We're pleased to speak once again with the University of Michigan-based historian and bestselling author, Scott Ellsworth, whose books include "The Secret Game," "The World Beneath Their Feet," and "Death in a Promised Land," the last-named being his account of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, a pioneering text which first appeared in the 1980s. Originally from Tulsa, Ellsworth has just published an all-important follow-up to "Death in a Promised Land," which he tells us about.

Our guest is Karlos K. Hill, Associate Professor and Chair of the Clara Luper Department of African and African American Studies at the University of Oklahoma. He joins us to discuss his unsettling and comprehensive new book, "The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre: A Photographic History." It's a vast gathering of photographs that were taken before, during, and after the massacre, mostly by white photographers.

Illustration by Marlin Lavanhar (via The Black Wall Street Times)

On this edition of ST, we're pleased to speak with Marlin Lavanhar, a Unitarian Universalist minister who's been based at All Souls Church here in Tulsa since 2000. A longtime social justice activist and tireless human rights advocate, Lavanhar recently launched a series of editorial cartoons focused on the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre -- and on the urgent need for reparations to be conveyed to those directly affected by this vast, tragic, century-old crime.

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest is Tamara Payne, who's the primary researcher and co-author (along with her late father, the esteemed investigative journalist Les Payne) of "The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X." The recipient of the 2020 National Book Award, this biography draws upon countless interviews in order to contextualize Malcolm's life not only within the Nation of Islam but also within the broader sweep of modern American history.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Dr. Fern L. Johnson, a Senior Research Scholar and Professor Emerita at Clark University who focuses on race and culture. She and her partner, Marlene G. Fine, are the white parents of African American sons, and they're also the co-authors of a new book, "Let's Talk Race: A Guide for White People." The book aims to provide personal insights as well as practical guidance -- along with ample research findings, prompts for personal reflection, a variety of race-oriented conversation-starters, and a useful list of "dos" and "don'ts."