Sand Springs

On this edition of ST, we learn about the Osage Forest of Peace, which is located on hundreds of acres in Sand Springs, and which dates back to 1979. This nonprofit sanctuary is, per its website, an "interspiritual, contemplative retreat center.... [It aims to] provide sacred space for individual retreats, group retreats, or a day of respite from the busy world. [Therefore, its] environment is supportive of all those who desire to engage in 'dialogue of the heart' through prayer and meditation." Our guest is Rev.

AP Photo

As widespread clean-up and repairs begin to take shape in Northeastern Oklahoma, after the recent flood event -- the second "500-year flood" to occur in our community in 32 years, by the way -- many of us are wondering what needs to be done, in both the short and long term, to fix the levee system. Our guests are Tulsa County Commissioner Karen Keith and District 12 Levee Commissioner Todd  Kilpatrick, both of whom worked closely during the recent crisis with the Army Corps of Engineers, the National Guard, and an array of federal, state, and local officials.

Photo by Bernie Guzik

Our guest is the locally based musician and photographer, Bernie Guzik. As a tuba player, the Ohio-born Guzik, who attended Julliard, has peformed with the New York Philharmonic, the American Symphony Orchestra, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Kansas City Philharmonic, the Tulsa Philharmonic, the Tulsa Symphony, and so forth. Now retired from music, he devotes more and more time to his other longtime passion: photography. Guzik tells us about this passion, which has led him to travel all over the world, documenting vanishing cultures with his camera.

Photo by Steve Clem

The Sand Springs Cultural & Historical Museum is presenting the artwork of the late Louisiana Cajun painter, George Rodrigue. Rodrigue is best known for his "blue dog" paintings, which he created over the last two decades of his life, but throughout his career, he painted numerous images depicting the people and places of his south Louisiana home. 

NPR Staff

Recently, Public Radio Tulsa’s Steve Clem took a handful of classmates back to his grade school, Garfield Elementary in Sand Springs to talk about the seminal event of his childhood, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.   It happened 55 years ago this month.  From the same classroom where Steve and his fellow fourth-graders sat glued to the school’s black-and-white TV, they share their memories of that day and how it changed them.

KWGS News

Sand Springs is the only Tulsa suburb without an aquatics feature in any of its’ city parks. That will soon no longer be the case. Ground is broken today for a new Super splash pad in Sand Springs River City Park. Director of Parks Grant Gerondale says it features something unique, a large dumping bucket with hundreds of gallons of water that gives a Tsunami effect, one of only three in the state.

A G-O bond and the Rotary Club funded the Super splash, located next to an area recently damaged by a March tornado. A second splash pad is being built in Pratt-Civitan Park.   

On this edition of ST, we welcome Robert J. LaFortune, a former Mayor of Tulsa, and Ann Patton, a locally based writer, activist, and former journalist. Patton has a new book out, for which LaFortune wrote the Foreword; it's a collection of essays on and photos of the Arkansas River, and it's called "The Tulsa River." But to what degree is Tulsa truly a "river city"? And are the age-old questions about riverfront development in this community changing -- or else taking on new meaning -- given the eventual creation of A Gathering Place on Riverside Drive?