Sexual Assault

Cherokee Nation

Cherokee Nation on Thursday opened a new Tahlequah facility for its ONE FIRE Victims Services program, corresponding with the beginning of Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

"Our move to our new facility is going to be great for us," said interim director Shawna Duch. "We've got a more secure location, we've got a bigger location, we've got an office that looks like home. It's going to be comfortable for a survivor to come in and get services here."

US Army Ft. Sill

The commanding general of the U.S. Army's Fort Sill said Thursday an investigation is underway into allegations of sexual assault made by a soldier against multiple members of training cadre.

Maj. Gen. Kenneth Kamper told reporters at a press briefing that a soldier assigned to the Comanche County installation came forward Saturday to report the assault, and the incident was immediately referred to law enforcement and the Army's criminal investigation division, or CID.

(Note: This interview first aired in September of 2020.) Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her latest book, which is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

Purcell Police Department

PURCELL, Okla. (AP) — An Oklahoma police officer was arrested and charged Thursday with felony sexual battery after a woman accused him of sexually assaulting her while he was on duty, the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation reported.

Purcell police officer Jason Baca, 41, was arrested after turning himself in, according to an OSBI statement. Court records show Baca was released from the McLain County Jail after posting a $50,000 bond.

Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her newest book, which is just out in paperback; the book is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

Facebook / Cowboy Gatherin' Church

A pastor in Inola has been arrested following allegations of sexual assault by three children.

Roy Shoop, 55, pastor of the Cowboy Gatherin' Church, was taken into custody by Rogers County Sheriff's deputies Wednesday. 

Rogers County Sheriff Scott Walton said his investigation began with an allegation sent to his office by the Mayes County Sheriff's Office, and eventually uncovered three children claiming that Shoop molested or raped them in his home. 

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) Our guest is the bestselling young-adult writer Laurie Halse Anderson, who's widely known and appreciated for the brave manner in which she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Her novel "Speak," which first appeared two decades ago, was groundbreaking in this regard.

Our guest is the bestselling young-adult writer Laurie Halse Anderson, who is widely known and appreciated for the brave manner in which she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Her novel "Speak," which first appeared two decades ago, was groundbreaking in this regard.

Public Radio Tulsa

Sexual violence against women is not new. But the conversation about it is starting to change.  And the #MeToo movement has reflected thousands, or millions, more stories of personal pain and humiliation.

We took the conversation local. Listen to the full recording HERE.

Sexual violence against women is not new. But the conversation about it is starting to change.  And the #MeToo movement has reflected thousands, or millions, more stories of personal pain and humiliation. We’re taking the conversation local.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa is Brenda Tracy, a registered nurse who's based in Oregon. Tracy speaks often about sexual assault and physical violence on America's college campuses. In 1998, while she was a student at Oregon State, she was gang raped by four men -- two of whom were Oregon State football players. For many years afterward, as we learn on today's show, Tracy did not speak publicly about this devastating personal tragedy.