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An Exit Interview with Joe Worley, Who Recently Left His Post as the Tulsa World's Executive Editor

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Aired on Monday, November 3rd.

Our guest on this installment of ST is Joe Worley of the Tulsa World, who was hired by that paper in 1987 and served as its Executive Editor from 1995 until yesterday. He'd actually been the paper's Executive Editor for some 19 days when the biggest story of his tenure at the World happened: the Oklahoma City bombing. It was an event that -- as Worley tells us today -- would appear in article after article on the newspaper's "A1 [or front] page for about two months." He began his career in newspapering in 1969 in Johnson City, Tennessee -- his father had a friend or two at the local paper that hired him -- and he now plans to stay with the Tulsa World in a scaled-down capacity, writing a locally focused remember-when column for the paper's A2 page. Worley looks back on his long career at the World while also reflecting on the dramatic changes that have affected -- make that revolutionized -- the newspaper business, journalism, and communication itself. He also makes a couple of educated guesses as to where newspapers (as we know them now) might be headed in the future.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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