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"Under the Sky We Make: How to Be Human in a Warming World"

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Aired on Wednesday, March 24th.

Yes, the climate is warming, and yes, we human beings are causing this warming. And yes, things look very bad. But what can be done...and what can **we** do...right now? Our guest has some answers; she is Dr. Kimberly Nicholas, Associate Professor of Sustainability Science at the well-regarded Lund University in Sweden. Born and raised on a vineyard in Sonoma, California, Nicholas studied the effect of climate change on the California wine industry for her PhD at Stanford. Since then, she's published 50+ articles on climate and sustainability in leading academic journals; her research has also been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, and elsewhere. She joins us discuss her new book, "Under the Sky We Make: How to Be Human in a Warming World." Of this work, a starred review in Booklist noted: "This compelling book about climate change really packs a punch, because climate scientist Nicholas relentlessly brings things down to the personal level.... Libraries wondering if they really need another title on climate change should rest reassured; this is a realistic, accessible, and clarion call for change.... Students will enjoy Nicholas's wry observations and appreciate her approachable insights as well as her 'key take-aways' from every chapter."

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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