Democrats

Edward-Isaac Dovere is our guest. He is a staff writer for The Atlantic and its lead political correspondent. He's covered Democratic politics for 15 years, beginning in his native New York City and carrying him through the Obama White House...and then across the nation during the 2020 election cycle. Dovere joins us to discuss his new book, "Battle for the Soul: Inside the Democrats' Campaigns to Defeat Trump." As was noted by a critic in The Guardian: "Essential reading....

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A former Democratic state senator from Oklahoma City has filed paperwork to run for Oklahoma governor in 2022.

Connie Johnson filed a statement of organization last week with the Oklahoma Ethics Commission, which allows her to start raising and spending money on her campaign.

Johnson is the first Democrat to file paperwork indicating plans to run for the seat. Former state Sen. Ervin Yen, a Republican from Oklahoma City, also has filed candidacy paperwork indicating he plans to challenge Gov. Kevin Stitt in the GOP primary.

Democratic state lawmakers said this week they will run legislation next session to improve Oklahoma’s budgeting process.

From the announcement of an agreement by Republican leaders to the budget’s final passage, just one week went by. Senate Minority Leader Kay Floyd said that didn’t give enough time for lawmakers or citizens to read and understand the plan.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Democratic leaders in the Oklahoma Senate filed a formal complaint against one of their GOP colleagues over sexually suggestive comments he made publicly about the vice president.

Senate Democratic Leader Kay Floyd and Democratic Caucus Chair Kevin Matthews filed the complaint late Monday against Sen. Nathan Dahm. In it, they allege Dahm violated Senate rules requiring members to maintain “the integrity and responsibility of his or her office.”

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we get to know Kojo Asamoa-Caesar, who is the Democrat running for Congress in Oklahoma's First District. As noted at his campaign website: "Asamoa-Caesar is a first-generation American, the son of a certified nursing assistant and a taxi driver who were drawn to the United States from Ghana by the call of the American Dream....

We welcome to our show Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, a physician, epidemiologist, public health expert, and progressive activist. He was appointed health director of Detroit, Michigan, at age 30, and he was formerly a professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Dr. El-Sayed's new book, which he tells us about, is "Healing Politics: A Doctor's Journey into the Heart of Our Political Epidemic." As was noted of this book by Bill McKibben with 350.org: "This is a very important book.

Our guest is Eitan Hersh, an associate professor of political science at Tufts University. His new book, which he tells us about, is focused on how any American citizen can -- in these pivotal, ever-so-political times -- "make real change" is her or her own community. As was noted by a critic at BookPage: "Reform-minded readers who want to do more than cast a vote will find essential information in [this work].... Hersh brings unique expertise to this important book.... A fascinating mix of history, statistics, social science, storytelling, and personal insight.

Our guest is Robert Kuttner, co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, who is also a former columnist for BusinessWeek, the Washington Post, and the Boston Globe. He joins us to discuss his new book, which argues that the 2020 presidential election will determine the very survival of American democracy. To restore popular faith in government -- and win the election -- Kuttner maintains that Democrats must nominate and elect an economic progressive. "The Stakes" explains how the failure of our economy to serve ordinary Americans effectively paved the way for a demagogic president.

We chat with Ian Shapiro, the Sterling Professor of Political Science and director of the MacMillan Center at Yale University. He's the co-author of a new book, "Responsible Parties: Saving Democracy from Itself," which he tells us about. The book engagingly explores why and how the form of government known as democracy has -- quite strangely and paradoxically -- reduced if not eradicated trust in political systems worldwide.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, with Election Day one week away, we begin a series of interviews with the major candidates currently running for governor. Our guest today is Drew Edmondson, the Democratic candidate, who previously served as Oklahoma's Attorney General for 16 years. As noted at the Edmondson campaign website: "Upon graduation from college, Drew enlisted in the United States Navy, where he reached the rank of Petty Officer Second Class and served a tour of duty in Vietnam.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we continue our series of conversations with the major candidates running to fill the open seat in Oklahoma's 1st Congressional District. Yesterday we aired a discussion with Democratic candidate Amanda Douglas; today we chat with Tim Gilpin, also a Democrat. Mr. Gilpin, as noted at his website, "has practiced law in Oklahoma since 1986. Over his career, Tim has worked in both private practice and for the State of Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST, we begin our series of interviews with the major candidates running to fill the open seat in Oklahoma's 1st Congressional District. Our guest tomorrow will be Democratic candidate Tim Gilpin; on today's program, we interview Amanda Douglas, also a Democrat. As per the Douglas campaign website: "Amanda Douglas was born and raised in Oklahoma. As one of four children in a low-income family, [she] wasn't handed a lot of opportunities in life.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Timothy Dwyer, a writer whose work has appeared in Time, Washingtonian, and TheAtlantic.com.

Tulsa Roof Gets Makeover for Upcoming Election

Oct 2, 2012
KWGS News

Tulsa’s Kenny Nipp painted his roof in support for President Obama’s re-election. He realized Tulsa’s Democratic Headquarters didn’t have a sign big enough for his yard. Nipp wants to tell surrounding Democrats they’re not alone.

Nipp has gotten tons of support and backlash for this move. He is upset and believes everyone is entitled to their opinion of their political party. Nipp says he’d never wish ill will on Republicans and might give a helping hand to someone that wants to paint their roof for Romney.