Nonfiction

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) Our guest is Mallory O'Meara, an author, screenwriter, and film producer who lives and works in Los Angeles. She tells us about her new book, which is a biography of Milicent Patrick -- one of Disney's first female animators and the only woman in history to create one of Hollywood's classic movie monsters: The Creature from the Black Lagoon. As was noted of this volume in a starred review in BookPage: "Fascinating....

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) The acclaimed journalist and bestselling author Daniel Okrent is our guest; he tells us about his book, "The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out of America." This book looks back to the 1920s is reveal a dark, forgotten chapter of American history -- a troubling era with serious implications for the present day.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Donna Thomson, who is a co-author of "The Unexpected Journey of Caring: The Transformation from Loved One to Caregiver." As was noted of this important new guidebook by Booklist: "Caregivers often sacrifice their own health and relationships to take care of loved ones, which is a big problem in the United States, where nearly 45 million Americans provide unpaid care to an adult or child with medical problems or chronic conditions.

(Note: This interview originally aired last summer.) Our guest is Kendra Taira Field, an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University.

Our guest is Russell Gold, who has reported on energy regularly in The Wall Street Journal since 2002; his coverage of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was honored with a Gerald Loeb Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Gold joins us to discuss his new book, "Superpower: One Man's Quest to Transform American Energy." This book profiles Michael Skelly, an infrastructure builder who began working on wind energy in 2000, back when many people considered the entire wind-power industry a joke.

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest is Frans de Waal, a professor in Emory University's Psychology Department as well as the director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. He joins us to discuss his book, "Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves." Per The New York Times Book Review, the book is "game-changing.... For too long, emotion has been cognitive researchers' third rail.... But nothing could be more essential to understanding how people and animals behave.

(Please note: This edition of ST originally aired back in March.) Our guest is Mitchell S. Jackson, whose new book is an autobiographical collection of essays called "Survival Math: Notes on an All-American Family." As was noted by The Boston Globe, it's a "vibrant memoir of race, violence, family, and manhood.... Jackson recognizes there is too much for one conventional form, and his various storytelling methods imbue the book with an unpredictable dexterity.

Our guest is Larry Diamond, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. He is also a past director of Stanford's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Diamond joins us to discus his new book, "Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency." As was noted by Gary J. Bass in The New York Times Book Review: "[Diamond] has spent 40 years circumnavigating the globe promoting democracy in Nigeria, Venezuela, and some 70 other countries. Yet today he is aghast....

Our guest is Elliot Ackerman, the author of several widely-acclaimed novels who's also a former Marine; he served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. Ackerman joins us to discuss his new book, a collection of autobiographical essays called "Places and Names: On War, Revolution, and Returning." Per a starred review of this volume in Booklist: "[A] searing, contemplative, and unforgettable memoir-in-essays....

Our guest is Matt McCarthy, MD, a bestselling author, assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell, and staff physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he also serves on the Ethics Committee. He joins ST Medical Monday to discuss his new book, "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic." As was noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "A riveting insider's look at the race to find a cure for antibiotic-resistant infections, one of the most pressing challenges in modern medicine....

(Note: This interview originally aired last fall.) Our guest is Linda Kay Klein, whose detailed and engrossing new memoir looks at the devastating effects that evangelical Christianity's purity culture has had on a generation of young women in America. Back in the 1990s, the widespread white evangelical Christian culture created a "purity movement" of sorts -- purity rings, purity pledges, purity balls, etc. Girls were seen by this movement as potential sexual "stumbling blocks" for boys and men, and any expression of a girl's sexuality could be judged as a corruption of her character.

(Note: This interview originally aired in March.) If you follow the world of sports and fitness, you might know that "recovery" has become quite the buzzword. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're exploring the hype as well as the science behind various recovery products -- such as power bars, energy shakes, foam rollers, electrical muscle stimulators, etc. Our guest is the noted science writer Christie Aschwanden, whose new book is "Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery."

(Note: This interview first aired last November.) Our guest is David Grann, a staff writer at The New Yorker Magazine. He's the bestselling author of "The Lost City of Z," "Killers of the Flower Moon," "The Old Man and the Gun," and other books. Grann joins us to discuss his newest work of nonfiction, "The White Darkness," which profiles one Henry Worsley, a family man and decorated British special forces officer who also happened to be obsessed with Ernest Shackleton, the 19th-century polar explorer.

Our guests are the father and son team of John and Denver Nicks, who join us to duscuss their newly published, co-written book, "Conviction: The Murder Trial That Powered Thurgood Marshall's Fight for Civil Rights." This book tells the true and shocking but little-remembered story of a triple murder that happened in 1939 near Hugo, Oklahoma. An African-American farm-hand named W.D. Lyons was wrongly accused of this crime, and his lawyer was one Thurgood Marshall, who was then a young counsel with the NAACP's newly created Legal Defense and Education Fund.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we revisit an interview that first aired in April of last year with Dr. Daniela Lamas, author of "You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor’s Stories of Life, Death, and In Between." Per Publishers Weekly: "In this ruminative account of treating patients, Lamas, a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, analyzes how the critically ill manage life during and after treatment.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to our discussion with the bestselling historian Nathaniel Philbrick about his book, "In the Hurricane's Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at  Yorktown." We spoke with him last year, when the book first came out; it's now appearing in a paperback edition. As was noted by The Wall Street Journal: "[Philbrick], an accomplished popular historian...excels when writing about sailors and the ocean. He vividly renders the interplay of skill and chaos in naval combat by massive fleets, as well as the fury of hurricanes....

Our guest on ST is Jon Steinman, the producer and host of an internationally syndicated radio show and podcast called Deconstructing Dinner. A Canadian resident of Nelson, BC, he joins us to discuss his new book, "Grocery Story: The Promise of Food Co-ops in the Age of Grocery Giants." By closely studying -- and also drawing engaging stories from -- many different American and Canadian food co-ops, this book makes a case for the eventual (and radical?) transformation of the grocery store in the 21st century.

(Note: This interview originally aired last year.) What's it like to be an "ER doc" in America today? And how has that job changed in recent decades? Paul Seward is our guest. Now retired, he was a physician for nearly fifty years, and he spent most of those years working in emergency rooms. His memoir is titled "Patient Care: Death and Life in the Emergency Room." As was noted of this volume by Booklist: "Seward's engrossing and approachable memoir plunges readers into the unpredictable life of an emergency-room physician....

Has the long-standing, bi-partisan, and rather rarified U.S. foreign policy establishment effectively failed our country? Yes, according to our guest today: Stephen M. Walt is a Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He previously taught at Princeton and the University of Chicago, and he's now a contributing editor at Foreign Policy magazine. Walt's latest book is "The Hell of Good Intentions: America's Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S.

The acclaimed journalist and bestselling author Daniel Okrent is our guest; he tells us about his new book, "The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out of America." This book looks back to the 1920s is reveal a dark and forgotten chapter of American history -- a troubling era with serious implications for the present day.

Our guest is Mallory O'Meara, an author, screenwriter, and film producer who lives and works in Los Angeles. She tells us about her new book, which is a biography of Milicent Patrick -- one of Disney's first female animators and the only woman in history to create one of Hollywood's classic movie monsters: The Creature from the Black Lagoon. As was noted of this volume in a starred review in BookPage: "Fascinating....

(Note: This interview originally aired back in November.) News flash: Cats do not meow at random. Nor do they hiss because they have nothing better to do. Cat sounds do have a purpose -- and they can carry important messages. But what ARE those messages? Our guest has some interesting answers: Susanne Schötz, a professor at Lund University in Sweden, is part of a long-standing research program exploring how and why cats use vocal communication...with each other and with their human caretakers.

(Note: This installment of ST Medical Monday originally aired last summer.) It's taken a while for this particular truth to sink in, but America finally seems to be waking up to it: People with mental illness don't need to be locked up -- they need to be treated. On this edition of our show, we speak with journalist Alisa Roth, whose book, "Insane," is a well-regarded and alarming exposé of the mental health crisis now facing our courts, jails, and prisons. As was noted  of this book by The New York Times Book Review: "Chilling....

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Lori Gottlieb, who tells us about her bestselling new memoir, "Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed." As was noted of this book by a critic writing for The New York Times: "Gottlieb's book is perhaps the first I've read that explains the therapeutic process in no-nonsense terms while simultaneously giving hope to therapy skeptics like me who think real change through talk is elusive." And further, per The Washington Post: "Who could resist watching a therapist grapple with the same questions her patients have

(Note: This interview first aired back in November.) Our guest is the noted playwright, Sarah Ruhl, a Tony Award nominee and the author of "100 Essays I Don't Have Time to Write," which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She tells us about her newest book, a collection of moving and insightful letters between herself and Max Ritvo (1990-2016). Ruhl teaches at the Yale School of Drama, and Ritvo, a noted poet who died young of cancer, had been one of her favorite students.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in January.) Our guest is Dr. Duane Bidwell, a  professor of practical theology, spiritual care, and counseling at Claremont School of Theology in California. He tells us about his book, "When One Religion Isn't Enough: The Lives of Spiritually Fluid People." This timely volume, named a Best Book of 2018 by Library Journal, looks closely and respectfully at the lives of people who embrace two or more religious traditions.

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Monique Tello, a practicing primary care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, an instructor at Harvard Medical School, and a published clinical researcher. She tells us about her book, "Healthy Habits for Your Heart: 100 Simple, Effective Ways to Lower Your Blood Pressure and Maintain Your Heart's Health." Dr. Tello also, as we learn today, writes for the popular Harvard Health Blog as well as her own GenerallyMedicine blog.

Our guest is Frans de Waal, a professor in Emory University's Psychology Department as well as the director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. He joins us to discuss his new book, the bestselling "Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves." Per The New York Times Book Review, the book is "game-changing.... For too long, emotion has been cognitive researchers' third rail.... But nothing could be more essential to understanding how people and animals behave.

If you follow the world of sports and fitness, you might know that "recovery" has become quite the buzzword. On this edition of ST Medical, we're exploring the hype as well as the science behind various recovery products -- such as power bars, energy shakes, foam rollers, electrical muscle stimulators, etc.

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