Smalltown Life

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome John Wooley back to our show. He's well-known for hosting the popular Swing on This western-swing program, which is heard Saturday nights at 7pm here on Public Radio 89.5 FM. He's also a prolific author -- of both faction and nonfiction -- with an array of interests and passions. Wooley joins us to discuss his newest book, just out, which he co-wrote.

Our gust is Craig Johnson, author of the beloved and best-selling "Longmire" series of mystery novels. His newest book, "Land of Wolves," is the 15th novel to feature the Wyoming-based protagonist, Sheriff Walt Longmire. (These novels are also the basis, of course, for a popular TV series on Netflix.) Mr. Johnson will appear at a ticketed reading/signing event here in Tulsa on Thursday the 26th at the IDL Ballroom.

Our guest is the journalist Sarah Smarsh, whose book, "Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth," is now out in paperback. It's a far-reaching account of her coming of age in smalltown Kansas that sharply explores matters of poverty, class, family, income inequality, Midwestern values, personal ambition, faith, womanhood, and other key social and economic concerns.

Our guest is Gaylon White, who was a sportswriter for the Denver Post, the Arizona Republic, and the Oklahoma Journal before working in the corporate world for nearly forty years. He tells us about his new book, which is his third volume to focus on minor-league baseball. The book is "Left on Base in the Bush Leagues: Legends, Near Greats, and Unknowns in the Minors." As was noted of this work by a reviewer for Baseball Almanac: "Immerse yourself in the magic of being a bush league fan....

Today we welcome Sterlin Harjo back to StudioTulsa. The celebrated locally-based filmmaker has a new movie, which he tells us about. It's a documentary short called "Terlton," and it'll have its world premiere this coming Saturday, the 13th, as part of the 2019 Circle Cinema Film Festival. "Terlton" takes us back to the summer of 1985, when a small town in Oklahoma -- incredibly, and so sadly -- lost a full one-fourth of its population when an explosion happened at a local fireworks factory.

(Note: This interview originally aired last summer.) Our guest is Kendra Taira Field, an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University.

In 2013, Dr. Ayaz Virji left a comfortable job at an East Coast hospital and moved to a medical facility in a small town in Minnesota; he felt personally driven -- indeed, he felt called -- to address the dire shortage of doctors in rural America. But in 2016, his choice to relocate was tested when the reliably blue and working-class county where he lived swung for Donald Trump. Leading up to and following Trump's election, Dr. Virji  was shocked to suddenly see his children facing anti-Muslim remarks at school.

Faculty and fellows participating in the HEAL Initiative in Hinche, Haiti. (UC-San Francisco)

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, an interesting discussion of global health -- that is, thinking about the health and well-being of the world's populations in a global context, and moreover, about how to serve those populations by improving care (and achieving equity of care) for all people. It's about seeing health care as a basic human right, and thus as something that people all over the world are fully entitled to. Our guest is Dr. Phuoc Le of the University of California at San Francisco, who also teaches in the public health program at UC-Berkeley. Dr.

How did our nation's current opioid crisis come about? What steps were -- or were not -- taken as this epidemic was first being recognized? Who should ultimately be held accountable for this widespread tragedy? What policies enabled it, and who has benefitted most from those disastrous policies? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we feature a "live onstage" interview that host John Schummann recently recorded here in Tulsa with Chris McGreal, a senior writer at The Guardian and former journalist for BBC.

Photo by Valery Lyman

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview that first aired in May with the photographer and filmmaker Valery Lyman, who has a striking show on view at Living Arts in downtown Tulsa called "Breaking Ground." This show -- which actually closes today, the 12th -- aims to travel, per the Living Arts website, "through the American psyche and landscape....

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. Ruth Potee, who is both a Family Physician and an Addiction Medicine Physician based in Greenfield, Mass. She's also the Medical Director for the Franklin County House of Corrections, the Franklin Recovery and Treatment Center, and the Pioneer Valley Regional School District. As such, Dr.

On this edition of our show, we learn all about Kendall Whittier, Incorporated, or KWI, which is a neighborhood-minded and long-running nonprofit now marking its 50th Anniversary. KWI is, per its website, "a home-grown organization incorporating self-sufficiency for our neighbors through food security, nutritional health, and well-being." KWI -- the only food pantry in the Tulsa area that actually delivers to its participants' doorsteps -- will host an event tonight (Thursday the 7th) in celebartion of its Golden Anniversary.

Photo by Valery Lyman

Our guest is the photographer and filmmaker Valery Lyman, who now has a striking show on view at Living Arts in downtown Tulsa called "Breaking Ground." This show, per the Living Arts website, aims to travel "through the American psyche and landscape. Documentary artist Valery Lyman has been photographing and recording audio in the Bakken region of North Dakota over the course of five years, documenting the rise of the oil industry there and the substantial migration that went along with it.

On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Hannibal B. Johnson, the Tulsa-based attorney, local historian, and prolific author. He joins us to talk about his newest book, which is just out: "The Sawners of Chandler: A Pioneering Power Couple in Pre-Civil Rights Oklahoma." As is noted of this compelling and eye-opening book at Mr.

Our guest is the accomplished nonfiction writer, journalist, and essayist, Anna Badkhen, who is currently a Tulsa Artist Fellow at work on her first novel. She joins us to discuss her book, "Fisherman's Blues: A West African Community at Sea," a detailed and engaging volume just recently published. Per the Dallas Morning News: "In elegiac vignettes, Badkhen portrays the trick and snare of a heroic and punishing profession....

"Bobby BlueJacket: The Tribe, The Joint, The Tulsa Underworld" is a just-published book exploring little-known aspects of American crime, Native American identity, and smalltown politics in the 20th century. It's also a biography of a real and remarkable person: Bobby BlueJacket, born in 1930, who grew up amid teenage rumbles, mean streets, dangerous pool halls, and Midwest safecracker crews -- and who actually went from being a career thief to a prison journalist to a Eastern Shawnee Indian activist. Our guests on ST today are Michael P. Daley, the author of this new book, and Mr.

Robin Lubbock / WBUR

The small Vermont town of Norwich (population 3,000 or so) has quite possibly produced more Olympic athletes per capita than any other location in the United States. How has this community done so? What's their secret? Our guest on ST, Karen Crouse -- a sportswriter who's been on the staff of The New York Times since 2005 -- set out to answer this question.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Alton Carter, an Oklahoma Book Award-winning author whose memoir, "The Boy Who Carried Bricks," was originally published in 2015. It's a painful-to-read yet ultimately uplifting autobiography that details Carter's growing up in smalltown Oklahoma. Carter will be participating in the upcoming "Chapters" event at the TCCL's Hardesty Regional Library, on September 8th at 6:30pm; this event is a fundraiser in support of adult literacy programs, and the deadline to register for it is September 1st.

On this installment of ST, we meet a young Oklahoma filmmaker named Taylor Mullins, who tells us about his new documentary, "Oklahoma Shakedown." As the controversy continues over whether waste-water disposal is playing a role in our state's alarming rise of seismic activity, this film profiles various Oklahoma geologists and residential property owners who have decided to take action to stop these incessant quakes.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa American Film Festival, which, per its website, "showcases independent feature and short films from across the U.S., highlighting Native American films, Oklahoma-based filmmakers, local student short films, a classic Oklahoma-centric film retrospective in addition to panels and parties." The festival happens later this week, from the 15th through the 18th, with screenings at the Circle Cinema and other events at the Woody Guthrie Center and the Gilcrease Museum.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with reporter Laura Ungar of USA TODAY, who's the co-author of an excellent and far-reaching series of articles -- entitled "Rural Hospitals in Critical Condition," and decidedly multi-media in both its execution and presentation -- that have appeared recently in the online and print versions of that newspaper.

On this presentation of ST, we speak with Marja Mills, a former reporter and feature writer with The Chicago Tribune. Mills is also the author of a bestselling memoir, "The Mockingbird Next Door," which details the time she spent getting to know novelist Harper Lee -- the author, of course, of the immortal "To Kill a Mockingbird" -- as well as Lee's older sister, Alice. Mills will discuss this recently published book (its origins, its development, its major findings, and so on) tonight, Monday the 8th, at 6:30pm at a Book Smart Tulsa event at the Circle Cinema.