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We're So Stressed Out...But Animals in the Wild Aren't...Why Is That? (A Chat with Robert Sapolsky)

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Aired on Tuesday, September 27th.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a fascinating conversation that we had in April of 2013 with the noted primatologist Dr. Robert Sapolsky. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Sapolsky (who's a professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University) about his popular book, "Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers," which is now in its third edition. It's an engrossing and often witty study of how stress affects the human body, and as we note in this book: "How many hippos worry about whether Social Security is going to last as long as they will, or even what they are going to say on a first date? Viewed from the perspective of the evolution of the human kingdom, psychological stress is a recent invention." Dr. Sapolsky will be a keynote speaker at the 2016 National Zarrow Mental Health Symposium, which is happening here in Tulsa from tomorrow (the 28th) through Friday (30th). You can learn more about this year's Zarrow Symposium at this link.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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