© 2022 Public Radio Tulsa
800 South Tucker Drive
Tulsa, OK 74104
(918) 631-2577

A listener-supported service of The University of Tulsa
PRT Header Color
classical 88.7 | public radio 89.5
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

State Question 777: Listening to Arguments For and Against the "Right to Farm" Proposal

oklahoma-photo.jpg
Aired on Tuesday, October 4th.

On this installment of ST, we are discussing State Question 777, the so-called "Right to Farm" proposal, which voters statewide will decide on come November. As was noted recently in a Tulsa World editorial: "Both sides in the debate over State Question 777...have been guilty of excesses in their arguments. The proponents have suggested that only a state constitutional measure could shield cherished rural values of decent working farmers from the meddling hands of bureaucrats and lunatic eco-extremists. The opponents have claimed that, were the measure to pass, almost any imaginable cruelty -- up to and including ramming a steel rod down a puppy’s throat to 'debark' it -- would become legal and have the same protection as free speech in Oklahoma. We don't think either nightmare scenario is likely, and chalk up the exaggerated rhetoric to the need to get voters excited....and the desire to raise money." We at StudioTulsa aim to discuss this debate without such out-sized pronouncements, and in doing so we welcome two guests: one is against SQ 777 (former Oklahoma Attorney General Drew Edmondson) and the other supports the proposal (Michael Kelsey of the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Association).

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
Related Content