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"The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre: A Photographic History"

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Aired on Friday, May 14th.

Our guest is Karlos K. Hill, Associate Professor and Chair of the Clara Luper Department of African and African American Studies at the University of Oklahoma. He joins us to discuss his unsettling and comprehensive new book, "The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre: A Photographic History." It's a vast gathering of photographs that were taken before, during, and after the massacre, mostly by white photographers. (Some of the images are being published here for the first time.) Comparing these photos to those taken elsewhere in the United States at various lynchings, Hill sets out to document how white civilians, in many cases assisted or condoned by local and state officials, perpetuated a systematic attack on Black Tulsans -- their lives as well as their property. Also on our show today, commentator Mark Darrah shares a surprising, separate-yet-related anecdote from the World War I era of Oklahoma history in his essay titled "Subversive Acts."

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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