19th-Century America

Our guest is Dorothy Wickenden, an author and editor at The New Yorker Magazine. She tells us about her fascinating new book, which explores various interlinked facets of American history, including abolition, the Underground Railroad, the early women's rights movement, and the Civil War. As the noted Yale historian David W. Blight has written of this book: "As a revolutionary, Harriet Tubman made many allies, none more important than her Auburn, New York, neighbors Martha Wright and Frances Seward.

(Note: This interview first aired last summer.) Our guest is Colin Dickey, a writer perhaps best known for his popular nonfiction book from years ago, "Ghostland." Dickey is a regular contributor to The LA Review of Books and Lapham's Quarterly; he also co-edited "The Morbid Anatomy Anthology." An active cultural historian and associate professor of creative writing at National University, he joins us to discuss his latest book.

Our guest is Olivia Campbell, a journalist specializing in medicine and women who has written for The Guardian, The Washington Post, New York Magazine, and several other publications. Her first book is just out, and she joins us on ST Medical Monday to discuss it. "Women in White Coats: How the First Women Doctors Changed the World of Medicine" tells how three remarkable Victorian women broke down all sorts of barriers in order to become the first women doctors, thereby eventually revolutionizing the way all women receive health care.

(Note: This discussion first aired in October of last year.) Our guest is the well-regarded historian and author Peter Cozzens, who joins us to talk about his book, "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation." This book argues that Tecumseh was actually a co-leader of sorts of the Shawnee tribe with his often-misunderstood younger brother, the shaman-like Tenskwatawa.

Photo of Claudio Saunt by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

Our guest is Claudio Saunt, a professor of American History at the University of Georgia. He'll soon deliver the 2021 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture at the University of Tulsa. His talk -- which will be offered as a digital/livestream/online-only event on March 4th (starting at 7pm) at utulsa.edu/cadenhead-settle -- will explore how slavery and indigenous dispossession effectively built the Antebellum South.

Our guest is Michelle Commander, an Associate Director and Curator at The Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture, which is a branch of the New York Public Library located in Harlem. The Schomberg Center has recently put out a pathbreaking new anthology, which she tells us about. The book is "Unsung: Unheralded Narratives of American Slavery and Abolition." It's a thorough and well-edited volume that traces gathers various writings and texts in order to convey the full historical arc of transatlantic slavery in the US.

National Park Service / Liberty Bell Center (nps.gov)

It's well-known that Americans today -- in so many cases, if not in most cases -- inhabit completely different worlds when it comes to acquiring news and daily information. But do we also have completely different understandings of our country's history? On this edition of ST, we're discussing the official report of the "1776 Commission." This report was released by the Trump Administration on Monday of this week...and then removed from the White House website two days later by the newly-incumbent Biden Administration.

Our guest on ST is Adam Jentleson, the public affairs director at Democracy Forward and a former deputy chief of staff to Senator Harry Reid. Jentleson joins us to discuss his new book, which argues that far from reflecting the intent and design of the Founding Fathers, the U.S. Senate -- from John C. Calhoun in the mid-1800s up through Mitch McConnell today -- has been transformed by a tenacious, often extremist minority of white conservatives. Per The New York Times: "An impeccably timed book....

"Yankton Sioux, 1837" by Gina Adams. (Hand-cut calico letters on antique quilt.) 91.5”H x 72.5”W, 2014. Posted at [www.ginaadamsartist.com/broken-treaty-quilts].

Our guest on ST is Gina Adams, a contemporary hybrid artist based in Vancouver, British Columbia. She joins us to discuss her striking and ongoing series of Broken Treaty Quilts. A descendant of both Indigenous Peoples (the Ojibwe tribe) and colonial Americans, Adams re-purposes antique quilts in order to create art works documenting the various treaties broken by the United States with Native American tribes over the years.

Our guest is the well-regarded historian and author Peter Cozzens, who joins us to discuss his new book, "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation." The book argues that Tecumseh was actually a co-leader of sorts of the Shawnee tribe with his often-misunderstood younger brother, Tenskwatawa. Please note that Mr. Cozzens will take part in a free, online, upcoming book-discussion event on Monday the 2nd, to be presented on the Zoom platform.

Our guest is Connor Towne O'Neill, whose writing has appeared in New York Magazine, Vulture, and Slate, and who works as a producer on the NPR podcast, White Lies. He joins us to discuss his first book, which is just out. It's called "Down Along with That Devil's Bones: A Reckoning with Monuments, Memory, and the Legacy of White Supremacy." Per Publishers Weekly, the book offers "an eloquent and provocative examination of the links between protests over Confederate monuments in the South and the resurgence of white supremacy.... O'Neill writes with grace and genuine curiosity....

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) Our guest is Walter Johnson, the Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. His new book is a far-reaching, unflinching, and complicated account of race relations in his hometown: St. Louis, Missouri. From Lewis and Clark's 1804 expedition to the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, the course of American events, Johnson argues, has been charted in St. Louis.

Our guest is the author and foreign affairs expert, Sarah Chayes, who has worked as the special assistant on corruption to Mike Mullen, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. She's also advised David McKiernan and Stanley McChrystal (commanders of the International Security Assistant Force) and has been a reporter for NPR.

Our guest is Colin Dickey, a writer perhaps best known for his popular nonfiction book from a years ago, "Ghostland." Dickey is a regular contributor to The LA Review of Books and Lapham's Quarterly; he also co-edited The Morbid Anatomy Anthology.

On this episode of ST, we revisit a discussion that first aired back in October. At that time, we spoke with Eric Foner, the DeWitt Clinton Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University.

Our guest is Walter Johnson, the Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. His new book is a far-reaching, unflinching, and complicated account of race relations in his hometown: St. Louis, Missouri. From Lewis and Clark's 1804 expedition to the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, the course of American events, Johnson argues, has been charted in St. Louis. His book moreover shows how the imperialism, racism, and capitalism that have defined the city have likewise defined our nation's history.

Our guest on ST is Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner, one of America's leading experts on women's history, who is on the faculty at Syracuse University (among other schools) and has been teaching college-level women's studies courses for more than 45 years. She'll be speaking tomorrow, Friday the 21st, at 7pm in the Helmerich Center for American Research (on the campus of Gilcrease Museum). Dr. Wagner's talk, titled "Forgotten Champions of Women's Liberty," is free and open to the public. More info is posted here.

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) The acclaimed journalist and bestselling author Daniel Okrent is our guest; he tells us about his book, "The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out of America." This book looks back to the 1920s is reveal a dark, forgotten chapter of American history -- a troubling era with serious implications for the present day.

(Note: This interview originally aired last summer.) Our guest is Kendra Taira Field, an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University.

(Note: This show first aired back in February.) On this installment of ST, a discussion of the history of race relations in America -- and of a landmark Supreme Court decision that profoundly shaped this history. Steve Luxenberg is our guest; he is a longtime senior editor at The Washington Post, and his new book is "Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation." As Louis Menand of The New Yorker Magazine has noted: "Luxenberg has chosen a fresh way to tell the story of Plessy....

The acclaimed journalist and bestselling author Daniel Okrent is our guest; he tells us about his new book, "The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out of America." This book looks back to the 1920s is reveal a dark and forgotten chapter of American history -- a troubling era with serious implications for the present day.

Our guest is César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Denver. On Thursday the 14th, beginning at 6pm, he'll deliver the 19th Annual Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture on the TU campus. He'll speak on "Migrating to Prison: Immigration in the Age of Mass Incarceration," which is also the title of his forthcoming book. His academic interests center on "crimmigration law" -- meaning, the convergence of criminal law and immigration law. His previous book, "Crimmigration Law," was published by the American Bar Association in 2015.

Our guest is David Treuer, an Ojibwe writer from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota, whose previous books include four novels and two books of nonfiction. He joins us to discusshis new book, a well-regarded historical study called "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present." As was noted of this work in a front-page appreciation in The New York Times Book Review: "An informed, moving, and kaleidoscopic portrait....

Our guest is the novelist Margaret Verble. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Cherokee America." Set on the American frontier in the spring of 1875, and specifically in the Cherokee Nation -- which would later be part of Oklahoma -- this novel follows a series of complex family alliances and cultural and racial clashes in the aftermath of the Civil War. It's a vivid (and often funny) novel of blood relations and home lands, of buried histories and half-told truths, and of past grief and present-day harm.

On this installment of ST, a discussion of the history of race relations in America -- and of a landmark Supreme Court decision that profoundly shaped this history. Steve Luxenberg is our guest; he is a longtime senior editor at The Washington Post, and his new book is "Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation." As Louis Menand of The New Yorker Magazine has noted: "Luxenberg has chosen a fresh way to tell the story of Plessy.... 'Separate' is deeply researched, and it wears its learning lightly. It's a storytelling kind of book....

Albert Bierstadt, Buffalo Hunt, 1860. Oil on canvas, Private Collection, image courtesy of Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Our guest is Laura Fry, the Senior Curator and Curator of Art at Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. She is also one of the curators of a striking new show at that museum, which she tells us about. Per the Gilcrease website: "Gilcrease Museum and the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming, have partnered to present the groundbreaking exhibition 'Albert Bierstadt: Witness to a Changing West.' Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902) is best known as one of America's premier western landscape artists.

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in February.) Lots of mythology surrounding the Old West, of course, and lots of rich history, too. On this program, we explore both. Our guest is Tom Clavin, the popular historian whose latest book is "Dodge City: Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and the Wickedest Town in the American West." As was noted of this book by the Houston Press: "Thorough, compelling, and entertaining.... Clavin sprinkles in fascinating tidbits about life and culture in the Old West....

There is a difference, of course, between a true leader and a person who's simply in charge -- but what, precisely, is that difference? On this edition of ST, our guest is Nancy Koehn, an historian who teaches at the Harvard Business School, where she holds the James E. Robison Chair of Business Administration.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) On this edition of ST, we chat with Michael Wallis, the best-selling Tulsa-based author of "Route 66" and "David Crockett" and many other books.

(Note: This program first aired back in January.) On this edition of ST, we speak with Randall Fuller, the Chapman Professor of English here at TU.

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