Affordable housing

Matt Trotter / KWGS News

City of Tulsa officials say that people experiencing homelessness who have set up encampments on West Archer Street will not be pushed to move until the opening of an emergency shelter in the former Juvenile Detention Center on Gilcrease Museum Road scheduled for next week.

Tulsa Crime Stoppers

The Tulsa Police Department and Tulsa Crime Stoppers are discouraging Tulsans from giving cash to panhandlers, even as those experiencing homelessness may be more visible during the COVID-19 pandemic.

"There are thousands of organizations in this city with -- just wanting to help as much as possible," said TPD Maj. Mark Wollmershauser Jr., on a Tuesday virtual town hall organized by Tulsa Crime Stoppers also attended by city councilor Lori Decter Wright.

Pixabay

The City of Tulsa has established a major piece of its four-year strategy to address a shortage of affordable housing.

It seeded an affordable housing trust fund with $4 million from a downtown revolving loan fund and has set a goal of raising up to $20 million. City Housing Policy Director Becky Gligo said that won’t cover all 4,000 units needed.

The current pandemic has brought keen economic hardship, of course, to a vast number of individials and families within various levels of American society. Given that so many folks who rent a house or apartment in our community now require extra time to acquire their unemployment checks and/or federal benefits, the Tulsa City Council voted unanimously last night to ask Gov. Stitt for a statewide moratorium on evictions. In addition to this, Tulsa County has historically had one of the highest rates of eviction in the country.

Oklahoma’s affordable housing tax credit will not be touched going into next fiscal year.

Gov. Kevin Stitt has vetoed House Bill 2760, which would have cut its annual cap from $4 million to $2 million.

Mental Health Association Oklahoma Chief Housing Officer Greg Shinn said Stitt’s veto message correctly noted cutting the incentive would not provide more money for the state budget until fiscal year 2023.

Pixabay

Oklahoma’s affordable housing tax credit is officially on the chopping block.

A bill to lower its annual cap from $4 million to $2 million narrowly passed the Senate on Tuesday and awaits the governor’s signature.

House Bill 2760's Senate sponsor, Sen. Stephanie Bice (R-Oklahoma City), said the state has one of the nation’s better affordable housing stocks.

File Photo

Oklahoma lawmakers could cut in half a tax credit meant to encourage affordable housing developments.

House Bill 2760 would lower the annual cap on the credit from $4 million to $2 million. Rep. Kyle Hilbert  (R-Bristow) said an incentive evaluation commission estimates the credit will lose Oklahoma $106.1 million over 10 years.

Tulsa Housing Authority

Work is underway for a vast project that will transform Tulsa’s Eugene Field neighborhood.

The first of six phases of the development that will be known as River West is now being built. It has 74 of 460 total planned housing units.

All apartments will have the same finishes and features, but some will be subsidized, some will be below-market and some will be market rate.