Hospitals

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Mike Scardino, whose debut memoir, just out, is "Bad Call: A Summer Job on a New York Ambulance." The book details his experiences working an ambulance job in Queens, New York, in the late '60s and early '70s. As per a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Fresh and powerful...Scardino looks back on his summers during college...when he worked as a New York City hospital ambulance attendant.

What's it like to be an "ER doc" in America today? And how has that job changed in recent decades? Paul Seward is our guest. Now retired, he was a physician for nearly fifty years, and he spent most of those years working in emergency rooms. He's just published a memoir, "Patient Care: Death and Life in the Emergency Room." As was noted of this volume by Booklist: "Seward's engrossing and approachable memoir plunges readers into the unpredictable life of an emergency-room physician.... His humble recollections are sad yet joyful, moving yet lighthearted.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about Physicians for a National Health Program (or PNHP). This collective, per its website, is "a nonprofit research and education organization of 20,000 physicians, medical students, and health professionals who support single-payer national health insurance." Our guest is Dr. Ed Weisbart, who heads the Missouri Chapter of PNHP.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we revisit an interview that first aired in April with Dr. Daniela Lamas, author of "You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor’s Stories of Life, Death, and In Between." Per Publishers Weekly: "In this ruminative account of treating patients, Lamas, a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, analyzes how the critically ill manage life during and after treatment. She meets people who are neither bitter nor sorrowful about their conditions, but are constantly aware of their precarious states....

Our guest is Dr. Elisha Waldman, a pediatric palliative care physician now based in Chicago, who tells us about his new book. It's a memoir called "This Narrow Space: A Pediatric Oncologist, His Jewish, Muslim, and Christian Patients, and a Hospital in Jerusalem," and it chronicles -- in ways lyrical, bittersweet, and inspiring -- the seven years he spent as a pediatric oncologist in Jerusalem. While there, as we learn, Dr.

(Note: This show originally aired back in October.) Our guest on this installment of ST Medical Monday is Dr. Victoria Sweet, an associate clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, who's also a prize-winning historian and a Guggenheim Fellowship recipient. She joins us to discuss her book, "Slow Medicine: The Way to Healing." This work, part candid memoir and part well-informed critique, argues for an across-the-board "slowing down" of the practice of medicine in America.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. Daniela Lamas, author of "You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor’s Stories of Life, Death, and In Between." As was noted of this book by Publishers Weekly: "In this ruminative account of treating patients, Lamas, a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, analyzes how the critically ill manage life during and after treatment. She meets people who are neither bitter nor sorrowful about their conditions, but are constantly aware of their precarious states....

On this edition of our show, we listen back to a fine interview that originally aired in May of last year. At that time, our guest was Dr. Rachel Pearson, who told us about her memoir, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer an interview that stems from three rather alarming facts. One: About 10 percent of Americans are implanted with medical devices (such as pacemakers, artificial hips, cardiac stents, and so on). Two: The overwhelming majority of high-risk implanted devices in the U.S. have never undergone a single clinical trial. And three: Medical interventions have become the third leading cause of death in America. What in the world, you might ask, is going on here?

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we are discussing World AIDS Day, which arrives on Friday the 1st; we're also talking more generally about how people with AIDS are cared for here in our community. We have two guests -- the first is Kate Neary, the CEO of a local nonprofit known as Tulsa Cares, and the second is Dr. Madhuri Lad, who works in the Department of Internal Medicine at the OSU-Tulsa College of Health Sciences (and who is, moreover, certified in HIV Medicine).

(Note: This interview originally aired in May of this year.) On this edition of our show, we speak with Dr. Rachel Pearson about her new book, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

Our guest on this installment of ST Medical Monday is Dr. Victoria Sweet, an associate clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, who's also a prize-winning historian and a Guggenheim Fellowship recipient. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Slow Medicine: The Way to Healing." This work, part candid memoir and part well-informed critique, argues for an across-the-board "slowing down" of the practice of medicine in America. As noted by a critic for The Atlantic: "Anybody considering medical school, or already toiling there, has to read this book.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the remarkable life and work of Dr. John Sarno, who died earlier this year at 93. As was noted in his New York Times obituary, Dr. Sarno was "a doctor at New York University whose controversial books on the psychological origins of chronic pain sold over a million copies, even while he was largely ignored or maligned by many of his medical peers.... Revered by some as a saint and dismissed by others as a quack, Dr.

On this edition of our program, we speak with the California-based physician and writer Lucy Kalanithi. Her late husband Paul, also a physician, wrote the bestselling memoir, "When Breath Becomes Air," in the final months of his life. (He died of lung cancer before his 40th birthday.) As was noted of this short yet powerful book by The Boston Globe: "Paul Kalanithi's posthumous memoir...possesses the gravity and wisdom of an ancient Greek tragedy.... [Kalanithi] delivers his chronicle in austere, beautiful prose.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. David Kendrick, CEO of the locally based nonprofit, MyHealth Access Network. This network, serving more than 2 million clients throughout Greater Tulsa, works to link health care providers and their patients in a digitally-driven data network aimed at improving the health of patients, reducing inefficiency and waste, and coordinating care more effectively. As Dr. Kendrick tells us today, MyHealth Access Network has recently received a $4.5 million federal grant to establish the Route 66 Accountable Health Community.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in February.) On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jessica Nutik Zitter, who practices the atypical combination of ICU and palliative care medicine at a hospital in Oakland, California. She's also the author of a remarkable new book, "Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life." As was noted of this memoir/critique/meditation by Kirkus Reviews: "End-stage patient suffering and distress inspire an early-career watershed moment for a sympathetic physician.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Robert Pearl, who was until recently the executive director and CEO of The Permanente Medical Group, which is responsible for the health care of 3.8 million Kaiser Permanente members nationwide; Dr. Pearl was also selected by Modern Healthcare as one of the most powerful physician-leaders in the nation.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Dr. Rachel Pearson about her new book, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care. Pearson’s inspired collective of illuminating clinical episodes immediately sparks to life with anecdotes from her early work in a female-owned and -operated abortion clinic in her 20s.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. Abraham M. Nussbaum, an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado School of Medicine who also directs the Adult Inpatient Psychiatry Service at Denver Health.

Celebrating the Art of Healing is a locally-based annual conference focused on hope and inspiration for cancer survivors and the families, friends, and medical professionals who care for them. This year's event will happen on Saturday the 9th, from 8am to 2pm, at St. John Medical Center in Tulsa. It will begin with a presentation by Neil Caporaso, MD, who is chief of the National Cancer Institute's genetic epidemiology branch -- and who is also our guest today on StudioTulsa. Dr.

On this edition of ST, we are joined by Craig Jones, who is President of the Oklahoma Hospital Association. Given the recent cuts in both Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement, large cuts in federal reimbursement costs for uninsured patients, as well as ongoing transformations in standards of care, medical technology, and qualitative outcomes, times are tough these days for hospitals, especially rural hospitals. Nationwide, 673 rural hospitals are considered "on the edge" -- and here in Oklahoma, it's estimated that more than three dozen rural hospitals are facing a troubled future.

On this installment of StudioTulsa on Health, we learn about Health Care Without Harm, an international coalition of hospitals, health care systems, medical professionals, environmental health organizations, and similar groups. This coalition was formed in 1996, shortly after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency identified medical waste incineration as the leading source of dioxin emissions in this country.

What exactly is palliative care, and to what degree does it differ from hospice? And why have more and more hospitals around the nation started offering palliative care programs, especially over the past decade or so? On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we present an engaging discussion with Dr. John Hendrix, the newly named Medical Director of Palliative Care and Hospice Services at St. John Medical Center here in Tulsa. Interestingly, Dr.

Morton Health Care

At the end of 2014, a surprising announcement appeared in the Tulsa World. A subsequent news item expanding on this announcement had the following headline: "Morton Clinics Won't Accept New Uninsured Patients, Citing State Cuts to Funding." Morton Comprehensive Health Services -- with clinics in Tulsa, Nowata, and Bartlesville -- is one of Northeastern Oklahoma's leading providers of health care for uninsured patients.

KWGS News file photo

From pharmacists who refuse to dispense Plan B drugs (which prevent ovulation) to legislation designed to limit a patient's end-of-life or euthanasia options, there's no shortage of controversial topics in America today when it comes to religion/morality overlapping with science/medicine. On this edition of ST, we discuss such a topic as we confront certain practices of some Catholic hospitals.

On this edition of ST on Health, guest host John Schumann speaks with Tracy Davenport, a self-described "health care coordinator" --- basically, this means she's a freelance case manager who works to help patients and/or their families navigate today's ever-more-complicated medical system. It's often about being a good listener and asking lots of questions, says Davenport, who's had many years of experience as a registered nurse.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with Dr. Barron H. Lerner, a Professor of Medicine and Population Health at the New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Lerner is also an award-winning and quite prolific writer on the related subjects of medicine, medical history, medical ethics, and medicine and society.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, which is a replay of an interview that originally aired in August of last year, we speak with the former medical director of the oldest (and one of the busiest) public hospitals in America, Dr. Eric Manheimer, who worked for many years at Bellevue Hospital in New York City. While internationally known for its psychiatric and criminal units, Bellevue is a full service public hospital that delivers babies, fights cancer, and is a major trauma center for the city.

Ever wonder why the U.S. spends double the amount on health care that any other country in the world does --- and yet, still, we as a nation do not enjoy the best health care? On this edition of ST, a discussion of efforts to improve American health care quality --- with an emphasis on where and how such quality-seeking efforts are occurring in Oklahoma.

On today's show, we chat with Dr. John Henning Schumann, a writer, internist, and medical educator at the University of Oklahoma's School of Community Medicine here in Tulsa. Earlier this month, Dr. Schumann wrote an article for The Atlantic entitled "The Doctor Is Out: Young Talent Is Turning Away From Primary Care" (which you can view here). As Dr. Schumann notes in this piece: "It's no secret that there's a looming crisis in primary care.