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"A Family Guide to Understanding Mood, Memory, & Behavior After Brain Injury" (Encore Presentation)

Aired on Monday, May 2nd.

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Not only are we learning more and more about the brain these days -- in ways various, surprising, and remarkable -- but we're also learning more and more about traumatic brain injury (or TBI). Our guest is Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, the director of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic at Carolina Partners, who's also a neuropsychiatrist at the Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Vaishnavi is one of the authors of the newly released book, "The Traumatized Brain: A Family Guide to Understanding Mood, Memory, and Behavior After Brain Injury," from Johns Hopkins University Press. It's a book that aims to, as noted in its Foreword, "challenge and encourage the reader. Whether an interested lay person, a caretaker, a family member, or a professional in the medical, nursing, or social work fields, readers will find this pioneering book a useful guide to the complexities of traumatic brain injury." One thing that might set this book apart from others of its kind, as Dr. Vaishnavi states on our program, is how it's aimed at families...not just at experts or individual victims. You can learn more about this book -- and can hear a free, on-demand "stream" of our interview with Dr. Vaishnavi -- at this link.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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