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Composting: The How, the Why, and the Health Benefits

compostwithworms.jpg
Aired on Monday, June 21st. [Graphic via treehugger.com]

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're talking about the science and strategies of composting -- and why it's good for our planet, and why it's good for us (mentally as well as physically). It's estimated that 1/3 of all the world'd prepared food materials go to waste -- and/or simply get thrown away -- so it's not surprising that composting is now becoming more and more popular among individuals and businesses alike. Our guest is Natalie Mallory, who founded (along with her husband Don) a Tulsa-based composting company called Full Sun Composting back in 2016.

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