Medicine

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Eric Garcia, a political journalist based in Washington, DC, who's worked for or written for National Journal, Marketwatch, Roll Call, The New Republic, The Daily Beast, and other publications. He joins us to discuss his remarkable new book, "We're Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation." As Garcia, who is himself on the spectrum, writes in these pages: "This book is a message from autistic people to their parents, friends, teachers, coworkers, and doctors showing what life is like on the spectrum. It's also my love letter to autistic people.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the physician, regular CNBC contributor, and former FDA Commissioner, Scott Gottlieb. His new book explains how the coronavirus and its variants were able to effectively demolish America's pandemic protocols and preparations. "Uncontrolled Spread" also outlines the steps that Gottlieb says must be taken in order to safeguard against the next outbreak. As was noted of this work by Kirkus Reviews: "The author...urges that preparation for pandemics be considered a part of national security.... These and other measures are urgently needed....

Our guest is the noted medical expert, Dr. Leana Wen, a visiting professor at George Washington University's School of Public Health and a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. She's also a contributing columnist for The Washington Post and a CNN medical analyst, and she was named one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People.

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is the progressive radio host, multimedia personality, and bestselling author Thom Hartmann. He tells us about his newest book, "The Hidden History of American Healthcare: Why Sickness Bankrupts You and Makes Others Insanely Rich." It's an engaging and highly readable narrative looking at how and why efforts to enact truly affordable universal healthcare in the U.S. have been repeatedly thwarted...and what might be done in order to finally realize this.

Our guest is Dr. Jillian Horton, a medical educator, writer, musician, and podcaster based in Canada. As an award-winning teacher of mindfulness, she works with doctors at all stages of their careers who are dealing with guilt, grief, burnout, frustration, and/or other professional pressures. Dr.

Photo from HBO [via NPR.org]

On this edition of ST, we revisit our interview with John Carreyrou, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter with The Wall Street Journal. In early 2020, we spoke with Carreyrou about "Bad Blood," his book about the bogus Silicon Valley blood-testing start-up known as Theranos...and about the charismatic young CEO of Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes, who at one point seemed to be taking the world by storm a la Mark Zuckerberg or Bill Gates.

Why do human beings sweat? And what other animals on this planet sweat, and why do they do it? Are there health benefits to sweating? Our guest is Sarah Everts, a science writer who has written for Scientific American, Smithsonian, New Scientist, and other publications, and who teaches journalism at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Uma Naidoo. She's a board-certified psychiatrist (Harvard Medical School), a professional chef (Cambridge School of Culinary Arts), and a nutrition specialist (Cornell University). She's currently the Director of Nutritional and Lifestyle Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, and she joins us to talk about her bestselling new book, "This Is Your Brain on Food." As noted by Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard University: "Dr.

(Note: This discussion first aired back in March.) Our guest is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

Our guest is Summer Knight, MD, MBA, who's Managing Director in the Life Sciences & Healthcare Consulting practice at Deloitte. Long seen as a thought-leader when it comes to the digital transformation of medical care -- and more broadly, when it comes to intersection of healthcare, business, and technology -- Knight previously worked as a firefighter/paramedic-turned-physician; she was also the founder and CEO of FirecrackerHealth.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Becky Wilcox, PT, MPT, PRPC, who was the first person in Oklahoma to be recognized (back in 2014) as a Certified Pelvic Rehab Practitioner; you can find her full bio here. A key part of the team at Physical Therapy of Tulsa, Wilcox is local expert on pelvic floor dysfunction, which is a broad term referring to a number of disorders that can occur when pelvic floor muscles or ligaments are injured.

(Note: This show first aired back in March.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saray Stancic. In 1995, she learned that she had multiple sclerosis. By 2003, she was walking regularly with a cane, had stopped nearly all unnecessary physical activity, and was on several medications. Flash forward to 2010, when she ran a marathon.... How'd she do this? It didn't happen overnight, of course, but -- through a series of dedicated lifestyle changes -- it did happen. Dr.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Daniel Gibbs, who's one of the 50 million or so people worldwide who've been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. But unlike most Alzheimer's patients, Dr. Gibbs worked as a neurologist for 25 years, caring for those with the very disease now affecting himself. He joins us to discuss his candid and engaging new memoir, "A Tattoo on My Brain: A Neurologist's Personal Battle against Alzheimer's Disease." In this work, Dr. Gibbs describes how he actually started to suspect he had Alzheimer's several years before an official diagnosis could be rendered.

We are joined on ST Medical Monday by Dr. Shantanu Nundy, a primary care physician, technologist, and business leader who serves as Chief Medical Officer for Accolade, which provides technology-enabled health services to Fortune 500 companies as well as small businesses. Dr.

Our guest is Suzanne Koven, a primary care physician and the inaugural writer-in-residence at Massachusetts General Hospital; she is also a member of the faculty at Harvard Medical School. Koven joins us to discuss her new memoir, "Letter to a Young Female Physician." It's a work that, as the writer Andrew Solomon has noted, "charts both the real and the spurious demands that the medical system makes on those who become doctors and care for us all. [Koven's] memoir is by turns reassuring and disturbing, comical and tragic, hopeful and dire.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we discuss a work that takes a careful and long-overdue look at how caregiving and burnout so often go hand-in-hand in this country. Our guest is Kate Washington, an essayist, freelance writer, and food critic based in Northern California. Her new book, which she tells us about, is a memoir/report/study titled "Already Toast: Caregiving and Burnout in America." As was noted by Kirkus Reviews, this book is "a biting critique of how America is failing its unpaid caregivers....

KWGS News

The Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust will help OSU with a new, rural physician residency program.

TSET is committing $2.4 million to the program, with OSU and Stillwater Medical Center covering the rest of the $6.1 million total. 

"It’s going to span three years, five residents per year for a total of 15 residents at the end of three years. The TSET funding, our funding, will pay for resident salaries and other expenses of the program," said TSET Director of Programs Jonás Mata.

The residency program will start July 2022.

Our guest on StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

Our guest is Olivia Campbell, a journalist specializing in medicine and women who has written for The Guardian, The Washington Post, New York Magazine, and several other publications. Her first book is just out, and she joins us on ST Medical Monday to discuss it. "Women in White Coats: How the First Women Doctors Changed the World of Medicine" tells how three remarkable Victorian women broke down all sorts of barriers in order to become the first women doctors, thereby eventually revolutionizing the way all women receive health care.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saray Stancic. In 1995, she learned that she had multiple sclerosis. By 2003, she was walking regularly with a cane, had stopped nearly all unnecessary physical activity, and was on several medications. Flash forward to 2010, when she ran a marathon.... How'd she do this? It didn't happen overnight, of course, but -- through a series of dedicated lifestyle changes -- it did happen. Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the National Center for Wellness & Recovery, which is based at the OSU Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa. The mission for this facility, per its website, is "to inspire hope and to develop innovative, science-driven treatment interventions to improve the lives of those afflicted by pain and substance-use disorders." Our guest is Dr. Kelly Dunn, a psychiatrist who is also the Executive Director for Clinical Treatment at the National Center.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. T. Colin Campbell, who has been for more than four decades a leading expert on nutrition research in American medicine. His bestselling book from several years ago, "The China Study," grew out of the most comprehensive study of health and nutrition ever conducted, which he led. Dr. Campbell joins us to discuss both his pioneering career and his newest book, "The Future of Nutrition: An Insider's Look at the Science, Why We Keep Getting It Wrong, and How to Start Getting It Right."

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer a discussion of what is commonly referred to as "long-haul syndrome" or "long COVID." Our guest is Dr. Stan Schwartz, who's the chief medical officer of The Zero Card, a digital-health enterprise. He's also a former medical director of Tulsa's Warren Clinic. Dr.

Our guest is Dr. Michael F. Myers, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University in Brooklyn, New York. He's the author or co-author of several works, including "Why Physicians Die by Suicide." Dr. Myers joins us on StudioTulsa Medical Monday for a discussion of his new book, "Becoming a Doctors' Doctor: A Memoir." As was noted of this reflective and readable work by Dr.

Our guest is Dr. Ina Park, who's an associate professor at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, a Medical Consultant at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Division of STD Prevention), and the Medical Director of the California Prevention Training Center.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about "Where It Hurts," a podcast co-produced by Kaiser Health News and St. Louis Public Radio. Our guest is the host of this podcast, investigative journalist Sarah Jane Tribble. Season One of "Where It Hurts" -- subtitled "No Mercy" -- was just completed, and as we learn on today's show, the full season focused on the intricate, far-reaching why and how of the closing of Mercy Hospital in Fort Scott, Kansas.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're looking at the connections between diet, weight control, and health.

Our guest is Dr. Jeff Spiess, who has been caring for seriously and terminally ill patients for 30+ years, first as an oncologist, and later in the realm of hospice medicine. (In 2016, the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine named him as a recipient of the Josephina B. Magno Distinguished Hospice Physician Award.) Dr. Spiess joins us to discuss his new book, which is just out. It's called "Dying with Ease: A Compassionate Guide to Making Wiser End of Life Decisions." More about this title is posted here.

Our guest is the author and doctor Michael Stein, who's also a professor of health law, policy, and management at Boston University. He tells us about his new book, which presents the many various moving, sobering, genuine, and often heartbreaking accounts of his patients about money...and about having (or not having) enough money to simply get by in the U.S. today. "Broke" gives us the words and thoughts of those now facing the reality of having to choose between getting medical treatments or paying their bills. As was noted of this book by Dr.

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in September.) It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr.

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