Medicine

Our guest is Dr. Neal D. Barnard, a faculty member of the George Washington University School of Medicine who is also a bestselling author and president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Your Body in Balance." As was noted of this book by Dr. Robert Ostfeld, Director of Preventive Cardiology at Montefiore Health System in New York: "[This book] is an incredible resource. If you have ever wondered how the food you eat impacts your fertility, erectile function, thyroid function, skin, hair, and so much more, wonder no longer.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Adam Hill, who works in the Pediatric Palliative Care Unit at Indiana University's Riley Hospital for Children. He joins us to discuss his new memoir, "Long Walk Out of the Woods: A Physician's Story of Addiction, Depression, Hope, and Recovery." As was noted of this book by Library Journal: "[Hill] shares a deeply personal story...in an effort to improve access, treatment options, and resources for all affected by similar conditions.

Our guest, Dr. Arthur Kleinman of Harvard University, is an acclaimed and influential scholar-writer on the topics of psychiatry, anthropology, global health, and cultural issues in medicine. He's also the author of "The Illness Narratives: Suffering, Healing, and the Human Condition," which has long been taught in many U.S. medical schools. Dr. Kleinman joins us to discuss his new book, a work of both memoir and scholarship that stems from the pivotal decade or so during which he cared for his late wife.

Our guest is Dan Weissmann, a public-radio reporter/editor/producer whose work has appeared on Marketplace, Planet Money, 99 Percent Invisible, and NPR’s Morning Edition. He once again joins us on ST Medical Monday to give an update on An Arm and a Leg, his widely acclaimed podcast about the various price tags that come with health care in the U.S.

As many of us return home for the holidays, we might see certain signs that our parents are not only aging but also, perhaps, are in declining health. What are those signs, and what should we do if we see them? Our guest has some answers. He's Tulsa-based attorney Todd Whatley, and he's with the Oklahoma Elder Law Group.

On this edition on ST Medical Monday, we learn about Sick, a podcast from WFYI and Side Effects Public Media (with help from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PRX). This podcast, per its website, "is a new investigative [series concerning] what goes wrong in the places meant to keep us healthy. The first season explores the complications of fertility medicine, one Indiana doctor's abuse of power, and the generations of lives he affected." Our guests are the two reporters behind Sick, Lauren Bavis and Jake Harper.

Our guest is Dr. Lisa Sanders, an internist on the faculty of the Yale University School of Medicine. She writes the monthly "Diagnosis" column for The New York Times Magazine, and her newest book, which she talks to us about, grew out of this popular column. The book is called "Diagnosis: Solving the Most Baffling Medical Mysteries." Dr. Sanders also tells us about her work on a streamable, multi-part Netflix series likewise called "Diagnosis."

Our guest is the Kansas City-based poet and teacher Anne Boyer, who joins us to discuss her bold, well-written memoir of cancer.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. B.J. Miller, whose TED Talk entitled "What Really Matters at The End of Life" has had more than 9 million views. He's also the co-author of a newly released book, "A Beginner's Guide to the End: Practical Advice for Living Life and Facing Death." Dr. Miller -- one of the nation's pre-eminent speakers on patient-centered care, palliative treatment, and end-of-life care -- tells us about his new book: how and why he created it, and what he hopes to accomplish with it. Please note that Dr.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Lori Melichar, a labor economist with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Per the RWJF website, Lori is "a senior director [who] focuses on discovering, exploring, and learning from cutting-edge ideas with the potential to help create a Culture of Health. She is also the host of the Foundation's Pioneering Ideas podcast.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Ade Adamson, a board-certified dermatologist and assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the newly created Dell Medical School at UT-Austin. As noted at this "bio" page from the UT-Austin website, where you can also access a list of Dr. Adamson's articles: "His primary clinical interest is in caring for patients at high risk for melanoma of the skin, such as those with many moles (particularly atypical moles) or a personal and/or family history of melanoma.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we welcome Dr. James S. Gordon back to our show. He's a Harvard-educated professor of psychiatry and family medicine at Georgetown University Medical School; he joins us to discuss his new book, "The Transformation: Discovering Wholeness and Healing After Trauma." This book grows out of Dr. Gordon's important work regarding alternative medicine at the Center for Mind-Body Medicine (CMBM), which he founded in 1991.

Our guest, Dr. Arthur Kleinman of Harvard University, is an acclaimed and influential scholar-writer on the topics of psychiatry, anthropology, global health, and cultural issues in medicine. He's also the author of "The Illness Narratives: Suffering, Healing, and the Human Condition," which has long been taught in many U.S. medical schools. Dr. Kleinman joins us to discuss his new book, a work of both memoir and scholarship that stems from the pivotal decade or so during which he cared for his late wife.

One in five Americans now has medical debt in collections. Today's rising health care costs threaten pretty much every small business in the nation. How did we get here? What can be done? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the bestselling author and Johns Hopkins surgeon, Dr. Martin Makary, who tells us about his book, "The Price We Pay: What Broke American Health Care -- and How to Fix It." The book offers, per Kirkus Reviews, "plain talk from a surgeon and professor who has long studied health care issues and finds the American system badly in need of repair....

On this edition of our show, we are discussing adverse childhood experiences (or ACEs) in Oklahoma. Specifically, we're talking about an in-depth series of articles about ACEs that ran in the Tulsa World earlier this summer. Our guests are Dr. Kim Coon, a Professor and the Director of Psychotherapy Education in the Department of Psychiatry at the OU-Tulsa School Of Community Medicine, and Ginnie Graham, a columnist with the World. Dr.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in April.) When we refer to "implicit bias" in today's world, we mean those unconscious stereotypes or automatic assessments that we all make -- all of us -- about people of a race, color, or background that differs from our own. What happens when implicit bias occurs among doctors, nurses, or other medical experts? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Jabraan Pasha with the OU-TU School of Community Medicine, where he is Associate Program Director for Internal Medicine and Faculty Director of Student Recruitment. Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer the second of three consecutive installments of the popular Life Kit podcast from NPR, which is an ongoing feature presenting useful "how to" tips to listeners on various aspects of daily living. Our own John Schumann co-hosted a trio of health-related Life Kit podcasts which originally appeared earlier this summer, and those are the three episodes we'll be sharing on our program (last week, today, and next week).

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer the first of three successive installments of the popular Life Kit podcast from NPR, which is an ongoing feature presenting useful "how to" tips to listeners on many various aspects of daily living. Our own John Schumann co-hosted a trio of health-related Life Kit podcasts which originally appeared earlier this summer, and those are the three episodes we'll be sharing on our program (today, next week, and the week after).

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Adam S. Cifu; he's the co-author of a new book about "medical reversal" -- i.e., what happens when doctors start using a medication, procedure, or diagnostic tool without a robust evidence base...and then stop using it when it's found not to help, or even to harm, patients.

In 2013, Dr. Ayaz Virji left a comfortable job at an East Coast hospital and moved to a medical facility in a small town in Minnesota; he felt personally driven -- indeed, he felt called -- to address the dire shortage of doctors in rural America. But in 2016, his choice to relocate was tested when the reliably blue and working-class county where he lived swung for Donald Trump. Leading up to and following Trump's election, Dr. Virji  was shocked to suddenly see his children facing anti-Muslim remarks at school.

Our guest is Matt McCarthy, MD, a bestselling author, assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell, and staff physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he also serves on the Ethics Committee. He joins ST Medical Monday to discuss his new book, "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic." As was noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "A riveting insider's look at the race to find a cure for antibiotic-resistant infections, one of the most pressing challenges in modern medicine....

(Note: This interview originally aired in March.) If you follow the world of sports and fitness, you might know that "recovery" has become quite the buzzword. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're exploring the hype as well as the science behind various recovery products -- such as power bars, energy shakes, foam rollers, electrical muscle stimulators, etc. Our guest is the noted science writer Christie Aschwanden, whose new book is "Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery."

On this edition of Medical Monday, as the Oklahoma Legislature has just recently completed its annual session, we offer a detailed review of whether and how our state's lawmakers have addressed various medical and healh-related issues. Our guest is Carly Putnam with the non-profit, non-partisan Oklahoma Policy Institute, where she serves as Policy Director and Health Care Policy Analyst.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we revisit an interview that first aired in April of last year with Dr. Daniela Lamas, author of "You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor’s Stories of Life, Death, and In Between." Per Publishers Weekly: "In this ruminative account of treating patients, Lamas, a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, analyzes how the critically ill manage life during and after treatment.

(Note: This interview originally aired last year.) What's it like to be an "ER doc" in America today? And how has that job changed in recent decades? Paul Seward is our guest. Now retired, he was a physician for nearly fifty years, and he spent most of those years working in emergency rooms. His memoir is titled "Patient Care: Death and Life in the Emergency Room." As was noted of this volume by Booklist: "Seward's engrossing and approachable memoir plunges readers into the unpredictable life of an emergency-room physician....

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we welcome Dr. Sunita Puri, who tells us about her "visceral and lyrical" (The Atlantic) new memoir, a book that delves thoughtfully and artfully into medicine and spirituality. "That Good Night: Life and Medicine in the Eleventh Hour" finds Puri telling her own story, as the ambitious American-born daughter of immigrants, as well as the story of her parents: what they did for her, gave to her, and shared with her.

More and more people these days are getting interested in -- and are, in fact, adopting -- a plant-based lifestyle. Healthy eating, healthy cooking, healthy living, and just taking more control over one's health, period: these practices all seem to be increasingly "mainstream" in America today. And so, in that spirit, the first-ever Tulsa VegFest will happen on Saturday the 4th at Guthrie Green in downtown Tulsa. The event is free to all, running from 10am to 4pm, and it will feature speakers from around the U.S.

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Monique Tello, a practicing primary care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, an instructor at Harvard Medical School, and a published clinical researcher. She tells us about her book, "Healthy Habits for Your Heart: 100 Simple, Effective Ways to Lower Your Blood Pressure and Maintain Your Heart's Health." Dr. Tello also, as we learn today, writes for the popular Harvard Health Blog as well as her own GenerallyMedicine blog.

If you follow the world of sports and fitness, you might know that "recovery" has become quite the buzzword. On this edition of ST Medical, we're exploring the hype as well as the science behind various recovery products -- such as power bars, energy shakes, foam rollers, electrical muscle stimulators, etc.

Faculty and fellows participating in the HEAL Initiative in Hinche, Haiti. (UC-San Francisco)

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, an interesting discussion of global health -- that is, thinking about the health and well-being of the world's populations in a global context, and moreover, about how to serve those populations by improving care (and achieving equity of care) for all people. It's about seeing health care as a basic human right, and thus as something that people all over the world are fully entitled to. Our guest is Dr. Phuoc Le of the University of California at San Francisco, who also teaches in the public health program at UC-Berkeley. Dr.

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