Medicine

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Uma Naidoo. She's a board-certified psychiatrist (Harvard Medical School), a professional chef (Cambridge School of Culinary Arts), and a nutrition specialist (Cornell University). She's currently the Director of Nutritional and Lifestyle Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, and she joins us to talk about her bestselling new book, "This Is Your Brain on Food." As noted by Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard University: "Dr.

(Note: This discussion first aired back in March.) Our guest is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

Our guest is Summer Knight, MD, MBA, who's Managing Director in the Life Sciences & Healthcare Consulting practice at Deloitte. Long seen as a thought-leader when it comes to the digital transformation of medical care -- and more broadly, when it comes to intersection of healthcare, business, and technology -- Knight previously worked as a firefighter/paramedic-turned-physician; she was also the founder and CEO of FirecrackerHealth.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Becky Wilcox, PT, MPT, PRPC, who was the first person in Oklahoma to be recognized (back in 2014) as a Certified Pelvic Rehab Practitioner; you can find her full bio here. A key part of the team at Physical Therapy of Tulsa, Wilcox is local expert on pelvic floor dysfunction, which is a broad term referring to a number of disorders that can occur when pelvic floor muscles or ligaments are injured.

(Note: This show first aired back in March.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saray Stancic. In 1995, she learned that she had multiple sclerosis. By 2003, she was walking regularly with a cane, had stopped nearly all unnecessary physical activity, and was on several medications. Flash forward to 2010, when she ran a marathon.... How'd she do this? It didn't happen overnight, of course, but -- through a series of dedicated lifestyle changes -- it did happen. Dr.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Daniel Gibbs, who's one of the 50 million or so people worldwide who've been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. But unlike most Alzheimer's patients, Dr. Gibbs worked as a neurologist for 25 years, caring for those with the very disease now affecting himself. He joins us to discuss his candid and engaging new memoir, "A Tattoo on My Brain: A Neurologist's Personal Battle against Alzheimer's Disease." In this work, Dr. Gibbs describes how he actually started to suspect he had Alzheimer's several years before an official diagnosis could be rendered.

We are joined on ST Medical Monday by Dr. Shantanu Nundy, a primary care physician, technologist, and business leader who serves as Chief Medical Officer for Accolade, which provides technology-enabled health services to Fortune 500 companies as well as small businesses. Dr.

Our guest is Suzanne Koven, a primary care physician and the inaugural writer-in-residence at Massachusetts General Hospital; she is also a member of the faculty at Harvard Medical School. Koven joins us to discuss her new memoir, "Letter to a Young Female Physician." It's a work that, as the writer Andrew Solomon has noted, "charts both the real and the spurious demands that the medical system makes on those who become doctors and care for us all. [Koven's] memoir is by turns reassuring and disturbing, comical and tragic, hopeful and dire.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we discuss a work that takes a careful and long-overdue look at how caregiving and burnout so often go hand-in-hand in this country. Our guest is Kate Washington, an essayist, freelance writer, and food critic based in Northern California. Her new book, which she tells us about, is a memoir/report/study titled "Already Toast: Caregiving and Burnout in America." As was noted by Kirkus Reviews, this book is "a biting critique of how America is failing its unpaid caregivers....

KWGS News

The Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust will help OSU with a new, rural physician residency program.

TSET is committing $2.4 million to the program, with OSU and Stillwater Medical Center covering the rest of the $6.1 million total. 

"It’s going to span three years, five residents per year for a total of 15 residents at the end of three years. The TSET funding, our funding, will pay for resident salaries and other expenses of the program," said TSET Director of Programs Jonás Mata.

The residency program will start July 2022.

Our guest on StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

Our guest is Olivia Campbell, a journalist specializing in medicine and women who has written for The Guardian, The Washington Post, New York Magazine, and several other publications. Her first book is just out, and she joins us on ST Medical Monday to discuss it. "Women in White Coats: How the First Women Doctors Changed the World of Medicine" tells how three remarkable Victorian women broke down all sorts of barriers in order to become the first women doctors, thereby eventually revolutionizing the way all women receive health care.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saray Stancic. In 1995, she learned that she had multiple sclerosis. By 2003, she was walking regularly with a cane, had stopped nearly all unnecessary physical activity, and was on several medications. Flash forward to 2010, when she ran a marathon.... How'd she do this? It didn't happen overnight, of course, but -- through a series of dedicated lifestyle changes -- it did happen. Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the National Center for Wellness & Recovery, which is based at the OSU Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa. The mission for this facility, per its website, is "to inspire hope and to develop innovative, science-driven treatment interventions to improve the lives of those afflicted by pain and substance-use disorders." Our guest is Dr. Kelly Dunn, a psychiatrist who is also the Executive Director for Clinical Treatment at the National Center.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. T. Colin Campbell, who has been for more than four decades a leading expert on nutrition research in American medicine. His bestselling book from several years ago, "The China Study," grew out of the most comprehensive study of health and nutrition ever conducted, which he led. Dr. Campbell joins us to discuss both his pioneering career and his newest book, "The Future of Nutrition: An Insider's Look at the Science, Why We Keep Getting It Wrong, and How to Start Getting It Right."

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer a discussion of what is commonly referred to as "long-haul syndrome" or "long COVID." Our guest is Dr. Stan Schwartz, who's the chief medical officer of The Zero Card, a digital-health enterprise. He's also a former medical director of Tulsa's Warren Clinic. Dr.

Our guest is Dr. Michael F. Myers, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University in Brooklyn, New York. He's the author or co-author of several works, including "Why Physicians Die by Suicide." Dr. Myers joins us on StudioTulsa Medical Monday for a discussion of his new book, "Becoming a Doctors' Doctor: A Memoir." As was noted of this reflective and readable work by Dr.

Our guest is Dr. Ina Park, who's an associate professor at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, a Medical Consultant at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Division of STD Prevention), and the Medical Director of the California Prevention Training Center.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about "Where It Hurts," a podcast co-produced by Kaiser Health News and St. Louis Public Radio. Our guest is the host of this podcast, investigative journalist Sarah Jane Tribble. Season One of "Where It Hurts" -- subtitled "No Mercy" -- was just completed, and as we learn on today's show, the full season focused on the intricate, far-reaching why and how of the closing of Mercy Hospital in Fort Scott, Kansas.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're looking at the connections between diet, weight control, and health.

Our guest is Dr. Jeff Spiess, who has been caring for seriously and terminally ill patients for 30+ years, first as an oncologist, and later in the realm of hospice medicine. (In 2016, the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine named him as a recipient of the Josephina B. Magno Distinguished Hospice Physician Award.) Dr. Spiess joins us to discuss his new book, which is just out. It's called "Dying with Ease: A Compassionate Guide to Making Wiser End of Life Decisions." More about this title is posted here.

Our guest is the author and doctor Michael Stein, who's also a professor of health law, policy, and management at Boston University. He tells us about his new book, which presents the many various moving, sobering, genuine, and often heartbreaking accounts of his patients about money...and about having (or not having) enough money to simply get by in the U.S. today. "Broke" gives us the words and thoughts of those now facing the reality of having to choose between getting medical treatments or paying their bills. As was noted of this book by Dr.

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in September.) It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr.

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is Dr. Jonathan M. Berman, who tells us about his important new book. That book is "Anti-vaxxers: How to Challenge a Misinformed Movement." As was noted of this work by Publishers Weekly: "Science professor Berman debuts with a useful guide for readers concerned about the opposition to vaccinations.... The book's greatest value comes from its insights into how common cognitive errors can lead even the well-informed to see false correlations between vaccination and health problems.

It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we, as individuals, do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr. Aly Cohen is a board certified rheumatologist and integrative medicine specialist, as well as an environmental health expert based in Princeton, New Jersey.

On this edition of our program, we learn about bariatric surgery, also known as weight-loss surgery. Once thought of in strictly "cosmetic" terms, the procedure has become more common, and more applicable, in recent years. Indeed, bariatric surgery is now known to foster significant loss of weight, recovery from diabetes, and improvement in the risk of cardiovascular issues. Our guest is a faculty member at the OU-TU School of Community Medicine and a specialist in bariatric procedures, Dr. Robert B. Lim. Dr.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) What do we mean by the phrase "patient-centered care"? And why is this expression being used more frequently in medical circles? Our guest is Dr. Saul J. Weiner, a professor of medicine, pediatrics, and medical education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He tells us about his book, "On Becoming a Healer," which is essentially a med school-based memoir/study as well as a critique/guidebook focused on how to become a more competent, more compassionate physician.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) Our guest is Eric Eyre, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter from the smallest newspaper ever to win that prize for investigative reporting. His book, based on the work that won him that prize, details his investigation into the corporate greed that pumped millions of pain pills into small Appalachian towns at the outset of America's opioid crisis. "Death in Mud Lick" tells the riveting and shameful story of a pharmacy in Kermit, West Virginia, which distributed 12 million opioid pills in three years to a town of 382 people.

There are many, many different skin-care products out there...and keeping skin healthy has long been a booming industry...but how did we get here? And why are there so many confusing messages from health experts regarding the care of our skin? Why are there so many ineffective treatments? Our guest is a preventative medicine physician and staff writer for The Atlantic whose new book explains the surprising (and often unintended) effects of our modern-day hygiene practices; his book also offers an introduction to the new science of skin microbes and probiotics.

Our guest is Pam Fessler, an award-winning correspondent with NPR News who mainly covers poverty, philanthropy, and voting issues. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Carville's Cure," which is tells the fascinating and little-known story of the only leprosy colony in the continental United States. This facility, located in remote Carville, Louisiana, somehow became -- over the course of the 20th century -- much more of a refuge than a prison.

Pages