Scientific Research

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Our guest is the award-winning science journalist Melinda Wenner Moyer, whose work appears in Slate, Scientific American, and The New York Times. She's also a parent, and she joins us to discuss her first book, which is just out. "How to Raise Kids Who Aren't A**holes: Science-Based Strategies for Better Parenting -- from Tots to Teens" is a guidebook focused on the many various concerns that moms and dads actually have in today's America.

Our guest is Kate Biberdorf, a scientist and chemistry professor at The University of Texas who -- as "Kate the Chemist" -- has written a series of very popular books on science for young readers. Now comes her first book for adults, which she tells us about -- it's a fun, wide-ranging, easy-to-read work called "It's Elemental: The Hidden Chemistry in Everything." Ever wondered what makes dough rise? Or how exactly coffee gives us that all-important energy boost? Or why shampoo can sometimes make hair look greasy?

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Uma Naidoo. She's a board-certified psychiatrist (Harvard Medical School), a professional chef (Cambridge School of Culinary Arts), and a nutrition specialist (Cornell University). She's currently the Director of Nutritional and Lifestyle Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, and she joins us to talk about her bestselling new book, "This Is Your Brain on Food." As noted by Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard University: "Dr.

(Note: This discussion first aired back in March.) Our guest is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

(Note: This show first aired back in March.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saray Stancic. In 1995, she learned that she had multiple sclerosis. By 2003, she was walking regularly with a cane, had stopped nearly all unnecessary physical activity, and was on several medications. Flash forward to 2010, when she ran a marathon.... How'd she do this? It didn't happen overnight, of course, but -- through a series of dedicated lifestyle changes -- it did happen. Dr.

Our guest on ST is Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, a professor of internet governance and regulation at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. He's also a faculty affiliate of the Belfer Center of Science and International Affairs at Harvard. Mayer-Schönberger joins us to talk about "Framers: Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil," a new book for which he's a co-author.

The well-regarded historian Niall Ferguson is our guest; his many books include "Civilization," "The Great Degeneration," and "The Ascent of Money." He joins us to discuss his newest book, "Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe," which seems especially timely in the wake of the annus horribilis that was 2020. Ferguson's book sets out to show why human beings are getting worse, not better, at handling disasters -- despite advancements in medicine, science, technology, etc.

Our guest is Steven Johnson, the bestselling author whose previous books include "Where Good Ideas Come From" and "The Ghost Map." He joins us to talk about his newest book, "Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer," which is also currently appearing as a TV documentary series on PBS. "Extra Life" is a book that offers, per Kirkus Reviews, "a surprising look at why humans are living longer.... Entertaining, wide-ranging, and -- in light of Covid-19 -- particularly timely."

Our guest is Shankar Vedantam, the bestselling author and host of the popular "Hidden Brain" podcast and public-radio show. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Useful Delusions: The Power and Paradox of the Self-Deceiving Brain." This book takes a detailed, research-driven look at the fundamental role of self-deception in human life -- that is, its positive as well as its negative aspects. As was noted of this work by The Washington Post: "Powerful....

(Note: This interview first aired last fall.) Our guest is Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett, a noted expert on both psychology and neuroscience who's also a University Distinguished Professor at Northeastern University in Boston. She tells us about her book, "Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain." Per a starred review in Kirkus: "[This is] an excellent education in brain science.... [Feldman Barrett] deftly employs metaphor and anecdote to deliver an insightful overview of her favorite subject....

Our guest is Herman Pontzer, an Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University and Associate Research Professor of Global Health at the Duke Global Health Institute. An well-known researcher in human energetics and evolution, he joins us to discuss his new book, "Burn: New Research Blows the Lid Off How We Really Burn Calories, Lose Weight, and Stay Healthy." The book draws on Pontzer's groundbreaking studies with hunter-gatherer tribes in order to show how exercise actually **doesn't** increase our metabolism.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Bret Stetka, an editorial director at Medscape.com, which is the professional division of WebMD.com. A non-practicing physician and active freelance health/science journalist, Stetka joins us to discuss his fascinating new book, "A History of the Human Brain: From the Sea Sponge to CRISPR, How Our Brain Evolved." It's a readable and engaging history of how our most mysterious organ developed over time...from the brain's improbable and watery beginnings to the super-complex marvel that's found within the head of Homo sapiens today.

Our guest on StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is journalist and author Larry Olmsted, who tells us about his latest book, "Fans: How Watching Sports Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Understanding." The book cites a wide range of new and recent studies on the topic of sports fandom, thus arguing that the more we root for a given sports team, the better our social, psychological, and physical health is likely to be -- and the more meaningful our personal relationships will be, and the more connected and happier we will feel overall.

Our guest is Kayleen Schaefer, a journalist and author who has written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and other publications. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "But You're Still So Young: How Thirtysomethings Are Redefining Adulthood." The book looks carefully at how thirtysomethings in America today are -- and aren't -- meeting the milestones which sociologists commonly cite as the five markers of adulthood: finishing school, leaving home, marriage, gaining financial independence, and having kids.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. T. Colin Campbell, who has been for more than four decades a leading expert on nutrition research in American medicine. His bestselling book from several years ago, "The China Study," grew out of the most comprehensive study of health and nutrition ever conducted, which he led. Dr. Campbell joins us to discuss both his pioneering career and his newest book, "The Future of Nutrition: An Insider's Look at the Science, Why We Keep Getting It Wrong, and How to Start Getting It Right."

Our guest is Dr. Ina Park, who's an associate professor at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, a Medical Consultant at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Division of STD Prevention), and the Medical Director of the California Prevention Training Center.

(Note: This interview first aired last fall.) Our guest is Harold McGee, who writes about the science of food and cooking. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Nose Dive: A Field Guide to the World's Smells." As was noted of this work by Booklist: "In his detailed survey of scents, food writer and cooking scientist McGee elegantly explains olfaction.... His exploration of our smelly world includes the odors of flora and fauna, soil and smoke, food and fragrances, but also the unexpected: primordial earth, rain, and the whiff of old books.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're looking at the connections between diet, weight control, and health.

Welcome to The Best of StudioTulsa in 2020. All week, we'll be listening back to some standout interviews that originally aired last year.

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in September.) It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr.

Our guest is Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett, a noted expert on both psychology and neuroscience who's also a University Distinguished Professor at Northeastern University in Boston. She tells us about her new book, "Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Kirkus: "An excellent education in brain science.... [Feldman Barrett] deftly employs metaphor and anecdote to deliver an insightful overview of her favorite subject....

(Note: This discussion originally aired back in August.) How do we learn? And how do we learn best? What are the most effective ways of educating today? Our guest is Dr. Sanjay Sarma, who's the leader of the Open Learning program at MIT. He joins us to discuss his book, "Grasp." This pioneering work looks at the science of learning -- i.e., how the acquisition of knowledge works both in the mind and in the classroom.

Velvet Brown-Watts, a locally-based advocate for Sickle Cell Awareness and Treatment, and her son, Jeremiah Watts, Jr. (Photo used by permission of the Watts family.)

November is National Caregiver Awareness Month, and in that regard, our guests on this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday are Velvet Brown-Watts and Jeremiah Watts, Sr. They are the caregivers for, and the parents of, Jeremiah Watts, Jr., who is a 16-year-old student attending Union Public Schools here in our community, and who was diagnosed with Sickle Cell as an infant. Velvet Brown-Watts and Jeremiah Watts, Sr., are also the co-founders of a nonprofit called Supporters of Families with Sickle Cell Disease, which they tell us about.

A high-sodium diet can be a deadly diet -- high levels of sodium have been linked to high blood pressure, strokes, and heart attacks. And yet, salt is everywhere. It's all but inescapable on the American foodscape; salt (and plenty of it) is in packaged foods, fast foods, canned foods, table-service restaurants, etc. So...why hasn't salt received the sort of public attention and regulatory action that sugar and fat have? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Michael Jacobson, who set out to answer this question.

(Note: This discussion first aired back in June.) What happens when a woman seeking an abortion in the U.S. is turned away? Our guest is Diana Greene Foster, PhD, who set out to answer this question as definitively as possible.

In late 2015, Zac Easter, a young man from a small town in Iowa, took his own life. The reason? According to the many journals and detailed writings that Zac left behind, this act of suicide was chosen by Zac because he was unable to continue his long-running battle against worsening traumatic brain injuries -- injuries that stemmed directly from the fact that Zac had been a football player, from third grade through high school.

Our guest is longtime Tulsa resident Jane Mudgett, a well-respected local leader and businesswoman who's also a certified coach, a trainer, and a partner at the Exceptional Leaders Lab. She joins us to talk about her book, which first appeared earlier this year.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in June.) Our guest is Sonia Shah, a science journalist who's long covered the intersection of science, politics, culture, and human rights for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and other outlets. Her latest book, which she tells us about, takes on many of our centuries-long assumptions about migration. That book is "The Next Great Migration: The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move." Per The New York Times Book Review, it focuses "with compassion and insight a deeply complex and challenging subject....

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is Dr. Jonathan M. Berman, who tells us about his important new book. That book is "Anti-vaxxers: How to Challenge a Misinformed Movement." As was noted of this work by Publishers Weekly: "Science professor Berman debuts with a useful guide for readers concerned about the opposition to vaccinations.... The book's greatest value comes from its insights into how common cognitive errors can lead even the well-informed to see false correlations between vaccination and health problems.

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