StudioTulsa

Weekdays 11:30am and 7:30pm
  • Hosted by Rich Fisher

StudioTulsa on 89.5-1 features down-to-earth interviews that make sense of complex issues and offer new perspectives on topics we might take for granted,hosted by Rich Fisher and produced/edited by Scott Gregory. It's an award-winning program and it's been a popular show here at Public Radio Tulsa ever since it began in August of 1992.

Medical Mondays with Dr. John Schumann are heard each Monday.

Photo via signaturesymphony.org

Our guest is the acclaimed Chickasaw classical composer, Jerod Impichchaachaaha’ Tate. He's known for blending Chickasaw and other Native American elements with European musical instruments to create compositions that've been performed by the likes of the National Symphony Orchestra, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, and others. Tate will be the focus of the next Signature Symphony chamber music concert, happening in-person on Saturday the 16th at the VanTrease PACE on the TCC Southeast Campus.

Oklahoma, as you might've heard, is welcoming more Afghan refugees than any state in the US other than California and Texas. How many of these refugees will be settling in the Tulsa area in the coming weeks and months? And what's being done to welcome these new neighbors of ours? What is being done to help them find homes or jobs, to help them enroll in school or locate health care, to show them how to obtain a driver's license or speak English? How are various groups and individuals throughout the Tulsa area working to ease their transition?

On this edition of ST, we offer an another installment in the Museum Confidential podcast series, which is a co-production of Philbrook Museum of Art and Public Radio Tulsa. This time out, MC connects with the legendary musician, painter, actor, and director, John Lurie, who might be best known as a co-founder of the Lounge Lizards, the jazz/avant/indie band that thrived on the 1980s "downtown scene" in NYC. He's also acted in many films, including "Stranger than Paradise" and "Down by Law," and has composed and/or performed music for nearly two dozen TV and film works over the years.

Our guest is Kyle Harper, a professor of classics and letters at the University of Oklahoma, whose books include "The Fate of Rome: Climate, Disease, and the End of an Empire" and "From Shame to Sin: The Christian Transformation of Sexual Morality in Late Antiquity." He joins us to discuss his hefty and fascinating new book, "Plagues upon the Earth: Disease and the Course of Human History." It offers a meticulously detailed "germ's-eye view" of human life on this planet -- from the origins of disease among our earliest hunter-gatherers to the current COVID-19 pandemic.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Eric Garcia, a political journalist based in Washington, DC, who's worked for or written for National Journal, Marketwatch, Roll Call, The New Republic, The Daily Beast, and other publications. He joins us to discuss his remarkable new book, "We're Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation." As Garcia, who is himself on the spectrum, writes in these pages: "This book is a message from autistic people to their parents, friends, teachers, coworkers, and doctors showing what life is like on the spectrum. It's also my love letter to autistic people.

Photo via Vancouver Symphony Orchestra

Tomorrow night, Saturday the 9th, the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra will begin its new season with a concert beginning at 8pm in the Tulsa PAC. It'll be the first time the TSO has performed in this space with an audience since the pandemic began (and masks as well as proof of COVID-19 vaccination -- or else proof of a negative COVID-19 test result -- will be required for entry). The evening will feature Shostakovich's Festive Overture, Coleridge-Taylor's Ballade, Liszt's Les Preludes, and Beethoven's Piano Concerto No.

Our guest is Anita Hill, the University Professor of Social Policy, Law, and Women's and Gender Studies at Brandeis University. Following her historic testimony at the 1991 Senate confirmation hearings for U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, Hill became a leading national figure in the fight for women's rights and against gender-based violence. She joins us to talk about her new book, "Believing." As was noted of this work in a starred review in Library Journal: "Hill's new book defies boundaries by bringing together elements of memoir with law, social analysis, and polemic....

Photo via WoodViolins.com

On this edition of ST, we meet the rock/classical/crossover electric violinist, Mark Wood, who will perform with the Bartlesville Symphony Orchestra on Saturday the 9th, beginning at 7:30pm.

On this edition of ST, we present a recently-posted episode of the Museum Confidential podcast, which is a co-production of Public Radio Tulsa and Philbrook Museum of Art. This episode looks at the "Smithsonian Anthology of Hip-Hop and Rap," a new box set that includes 9 CDs as well as a hefty 300–page book with original design by Cey Adams. Adams is a well-known NYC graphic artist and the founding creative director of Def Jam Recordings. He's long been at the epicenter of hip-hop culture.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the physician, regular CNBC contributor, and former FDA Commissioner, Scott Gottlieb. His new book explains how the coronavirus and its variants were able to effectively demolish America's pandemic protocols and preparations. "Uncontrolled Spread" also outlines the steps that Gottlieb says must be taken in order to safeguard against the next outbreak. As was noted of this work by Kirkus Reviews: "The author...urges that preparation for pandemics be considered a part of national security.... These and other measures are urgently needed....

Our guest is the Oklahoma-born, New York-based author and artist, John Paul Brammer. His new memoir, "¡Hola Papi!," is just being published. The book is an autobiograhical extension of his popular LGBTQIA advice column of the same title, which began in 2017. On Monday the 4th, Oklahomans for Equality will present "An Evening with John Paul Brammer" at the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center in downtown Tulsa, beginning at 7pm. This free event is being offered as part of OKEQ's annual celebration of Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month.

Our guest is one of the environmental movement's leading voices, and a pioneering architect of corporate reform with respect to ecological practices and philosophies. Paul Hawken is an entrepreneur, author, and activist who has dedicated his life to environmental sustainability and changing the relationship between business and the environment.

Our guest is Anthony Doerr, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning "All the Light We Cannot See," which first appeared in 2014, and which might be one of the most cherished and highest-selling novels of recent times. He joins us to discuss "Cloud Cuckoo Land," his newest novel.

On this edition of ST, we speak once again with the historian and bestselling author Nathaniel Philbrick, whose newest book is a fisrt-person hyrid of American history, travel writing, and personal reflection. The book is "Travels with George: In Search of Washington and His Legacy." It retraces four different trips that the newly-elected President Washington took throughout the ex-colonies comprising this country, speaking-engagement tours that our first Chief Exectuive made at a time when the United States of America was still a rather unconnected and quarrelsome political experiment.

These are, as we all know, particularly anxious times; in this age of the Coronavirus pandemic, anxiety is clearly widespread. But what are the "good" aspects of anxiety? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Wendy Suzuki, a Professor of Neural Science and Psychology at New York University and a well-known authority on neuroplasticity. She joins us to discuss her bestselling new book, "Good Anxiety: Harnessing the Power of the Most Misunderstood Emotion." Per The Washington Post: "The book contains surveys and strategies to help people assess and even befriend their anxiety.

On this edition of ST, we welcome back to the show Prof. David Shambaugh of George Washington University. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR) titled "Where Great Powers Meet: America and China in Southeast Asia." An internationally recognized authority and award-winning author on contemporary China and the global relations of Asia, Shambaugh has visited or lived in China every year since 1979 and has traveled extensively throughout Asia, Europe, and Latin America.

"The Outsiders" -- both the well-known coming-of-age novel by S.E. Hinton and the likewise-titled 1983 film by Francis Ford Coppola -- certainly looms large in the cultural history of this community. On today's edition of StudioTulsa, we meet the California-based, Oklahoma-born grade school librarian who, back in 1980, encouraged her students to create a petition asking Coppola to make the film. Yes, this is really how "The Outsiders" got on the path from beloved young-adult book to cult-classic movie. That librarian is Jo Ellen Misakian.

Police officers in the U.S. are nine times more likely to kill African-American men than they are any other group of citizens. A tragic statistic, to be sure, but also -- given so many recent events -- a statistic that many won't find very surprising. How police forces across the nation relate to matters of racism, civil rights, and race relations are now coming under close scrutiny. But what about the role of the courts in this issue?

Our guest is Joseph Arndt, who's been the music director at Saint John's Episcopal Church here in Tulsa since 2015. Arndt received his M.M. from The Juilliard School and his B.M. from Westminster Choir College in organ performance. Shortly after arriving in Tulsa, he founded the popular Music at Midday series at Saint John's, which he tells us about. The 7th season of Music at Midday gets underway tomorrow (Wednesday the 22nd, at noon) with a performance by Barron Ryan, the Tulsa-based classical/jazz/crossover pianist.

Our guest is the noted medical expert, Dr. Leana Wen, a visiting professor at George Washington University's School of Public Health and a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. She's also a contributing columnist for The Washington Post and a CNN medical analyst, and she was named one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to share Episode 1 of Season 6 of the Museum Confidential podcast, which is a co-production of Philbrook Museum of Art and Public Radio Tulsa. (Season 6 just launched earlier this month.) This episode begins with a few basic yet far-reaching questions. What is an "outsider artist"? And do we even call them that anymore? In recent years, the term has shifted to "self-taught artist." Sounds different, but does it mean the same thing? And what about "folk art" -- when does this term apply? We chat with Dr.

We've heard often about "essential workers" since the pandemic got underway -- those indispensable individuals who are, alas, in many cases under-appreciated, under-paid, or both. But such vital workers are not, of course, just those working in the medical, science, health, or rescue fields, and these workers were certainly an important part of American society **before** the pandemic ever hit. Our guest is the New York-based author and journalist Eyal Press.

The pandemic, of course, has clearly changed -- and is actually still changing -- how we think about work, play, relationships, entertainment, education, social interaction, and much more. It's also making many of us wonder about city life, i.e., what the pros and cons of living in an urban setting really are in this age of Covid. Are people still as drawn to cities as they used to be? And what does the future of the city look like? Our guest is David Cutler, the Otto Eckstein Professor of Applied Economics at Harvard University.

On this edition of ST, we welcome writer Connie Cronley back to our program. She's one of our regular commentators; her previous books include "Sometimes a Wheel Falls Off," "Light and Variable," "Poke a Stick at It," and "Mr. Ambassador: Warrior for Peace." Cronley joins us to discuss her latest book, "A Life on Fire," which is a fascinating new biography of Kate Barnard (1875-1930).

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is the progressive radio host, multimedia personality, and bestselling author Thom Hartmann. He tells us about his newest book, "The Hidden History of American Healthcare: Why Sickness Bankrupts You and Makes Others Insanely Rich." It's an engaging and highly readable narrative looking at how and why efforts to enact truly affordable universal healthcare in the U.S. have been repeatedly thwarted...and what might be done in order to finally realize this.

Our guest is Marcello Angelini, the artistic director of Tulsa Ballet. The company will present its annual "Creations in Studio K" program -- which is devoted, as ever, to new works only -- through September 19th; the Studio K space is located at 1212 East 45th Place in Tulsa. This year's rundown includes world premieres from both Yury Yanowsky and Katarzyna Kozielska, as Angelini tells us. Also on the bill is a performance from TBII, which is the second company of Tulsa Ballet. They're offering a world premiere by the award-winning choreographer Stephanie Martinez.

Our guest is Adam Tooze, a professor of history at Columbia University and the author of "Crashed," which was a New York Times Notable Book of 2018 and one of The Economist's Books of the Year. His timely new book, which he tells us about, mixes finance, politics, business, economics, medicine, and recent world history in order to trace what went wrong -- and why -- during the turning-point year that was 2020. This new book is "Shutdown: How Covid Shook the World's Economy." As was noted by Reuters: "Tooze makes a strong case for looking back and beginning to draw some conclusions....

(Note: This interview originally aired back in June.) Our guest is the novelist Jonathan Lee, whose latest book is a vivid, page-turning work of historical fiction titled "The Great Mistake." It's a novel set in 19th-century New York City that digs into the life and times of -- and the mysterious murder of -- a man named Andrew Haswell Green.

(Note: This conversation originally aired earlier this year.) History is one thing; mythology is another. And at times, of course, these two can overlap, or blur, or get confused. Such is the case with the Alamo, as our guest argues. Longtime journalist Chris Tomlinson is a columnist for The Houston Chronicle and The San Antonio Express-News, and he's one of the authors of a book titled "Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth." As was noted of this work in Publishers Weekly: "Substantive yet wryly humorous....

Our guest is Dr. Jillian Horton, a medical educator, writer, musician, and podcaster based in Canada. As an award-winning teacher of mindfulness, she works with doctors at all stages of their careers who are dealing with guilt, grief, burnout, frustration, and/or other professional pressures. Dr.

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