StudioTulsa on 89.5-1

Weekdays 11:30am and 7:30pm
  • Hosted by Rich Fisher

StudioTulsa features down-to-earth interviews that make sense of complex issues and offer new perspectives on topics we might take for granted. It's an award-winning program covering the arts, sciences, news events, books, politics, culture, economics, history, social trends, the media, the humanities, and so forth --- and it's been a popular show here at Public Radio Tulsa ever since it began in August of 1992.

Medical Mondays with Dr. John Schumann are heard each Monday.

The program is hosted by Rich Fisher and produced/edited by Scott Gregory.

Visit the StudioTulsa Archives.

Our guest is the esteemed pianist, Robin Sutherland, who's known for his long, well-regarded tenure with the San Francisco Symphony. He'll join the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra onstage on Saturday night, the 16th, in a concert led by Gerhardt Zimmermann. Sutherland will perform Mozart's Piano Concerto in C Minor; also on the program will be works by Berlioz and Lutoslawski. More information, including ticket details, is posted here.

Our guest on ST is Randy Krehbiel, who's been a reporter for The Tulsa World since 1979 and now covers political and governmental affairs for that paper. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Tulsa, 1921: Reporting a Massacre." In this deeply-researched work, Krehbiel studies local newspaper accounts in order to understand the mindset and motivations of Tulsa's citizens (both black and white) at the time of this tragedy.

Our guest is the Kansas City-based poet and teacher Anne Boyer, who joins us to discuss her bold, well-written memoir of cancer.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in July.) Our guest is the BBC journalist and author, Anita Anand. Her new book, a work of fascinating and compelling history, is "The Patient Assassin: A True Story of Massacre, Revenge, and India's Quest for Independence." This book tells the story of how Udham Singh, an orphan Sikh from India's lower castes, traveled to four continents over twenty years -- including the United States -- in an epic quest for revenge against a Raj official.

On this edition of ST, we learn about two 2019 Ruth Mayo Memorial Distinguished Visiting Artists here at TU, the painters Gideon Bok and Meghan Brady. They're based in Maine, and they also happen to be married. And their duo exhibit, "Being There," will open this evening (the 7th) at a special lecture/reception at the Alexandre Hogue Gallery on the TU campus. More info is poste here.

Our guest is Terence Hawkins, whose second novel, "American Neolithic," was named a Kirkus Reviews Best of 2014. In a starred review, some five years ago, Kirkus called it "a towering work of speculative fiction." This book is now appearing in a revised, newly re-published edition, and Hawkins tells us about it on ST today. As the bestselling novelist Tom Perrotta has noted of this work: "A one-of-a-kind novel, a bizarre but gripping amalgam of anthropology, political diatribe, and speculative science fiction....

Our guest is the Tulsa-based author Hunter Howe Cates, who tells us about his new book, "Oklahoma's Atticus." It's a work of biography/history that profiles his own grandfather, Tulsa County public defender and Creek tribal member Elliott Howe. Howe, as we learn, was closely involved in the investigation and trial of a Tulsa murder case that made national news back in the early 1950s. On Nov. 7th, Cates will do a free-to-the-public reading and signing in connection with this work at Magic City Books.

Our guest is Dr. Jen Gunter, who is board-certified in OB/GYN and pain medicine, and who writes about the intersection of women's health, sex, science, and pop culture for The New York Times. She joins us via Skype to discuss her new book, which is her second: "The Vagina Bible." Does eating sugar cause yeast infections? Does pubic hair have a function? Should you have a vulvovaginal care regimen? Will your vagina shrivel up if you go without sex? What's the truth about the HPV vaccine? Such are the questions explored in this thorough, useful, myth-busting, and best-selling book.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the Osage Forest of Peace, which is located on hundreds of acres in Sand Springs, and which dates back to 1979. This nonprofit sanctuary is, per its website, an "interspiritual, contemplative retreat center.... [It aims to] provide sacred space for individual retreats, group retreats, or a day of respite from the busy world. [Therefore, its] environment is supportive of all those who desire to engage in 'dialogue of the heart' through prayer and meditation." Our guest is Rev.

Our guest is Dr. Matthew Restall, a Professor of Latin American History and Anthropology at Pennsylvania State University. He tells us about his 2018 book, "When Montezuma Met Cortés: The True Story Behind the Meeting that Changed History." As was noted in the pages of The New Yorker: "Restall skillfully describes a subtler story of relationships both loving and coercive." And further, from The Wall Street Journal: "Restall has a well-earned reputation as a myth-buster in the history of the New World....

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome John Wooley back to our show. He's well-known for hosting the popular Swing on This western-swing program, which is heard Saturday nights at 7pm here on Public Radio 89.5 FM. He's also a prolific author -- of both faction and nonfiction -- with an array of interests and passions. Wooley joins us to discuss his newest book, just out, which he co-wrote.

On this edition of ST, we get to know Ahniwake Rose, the incoming executive director of the nonprofit, non-partisan Oklahoma Policy Institute (a/k/a OK Policy). Rose, originally from Oklahoma, has spent nearly 20 years working at the intersection of public policy and nonprofit management. Previously, she was the Deputy Director of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), a national organization serving the interests of tribal governments and communities.

Our guest is Dr. Sarah E. Hill, a professor at TCU in Ft. Worth, Texas. She's seen as an authority on evolutionary approaches to psychology and health, and her new book, which she tells us about, is "This Is Your Brain on Birth Control: The Surprising Science of Women, Hormones, and the Law of Unintended Consequences." As was noted of this work by Dr. Jolene Brighten (author of "Beyond the Pill"): "[This book] validates what generations of women have suspected since the introduction of the pill--birth control is doing a whole lot more in our bodies than simply preventing pregnancy.

Our guest is the Colorado-based writer and writing instructor, Joanna Howard. She grew up in the Sooner State, and her newly published memoir, "Rerun Era," looks back on her childhood amid the environmentally and economically damaged rural flatlands of Northeastern Oklahoma. The book interweaves her personal memories, her family's larger story and dynamics, and the various TV shows that they all came together to watch (and bond over) in the late 1970s and early '80s.

If fracking leads to more frequent earthquakes, then why do some states that've experienced widespread fracking (like Oklahoma) have so many more earthquakes than do certain other states (like Ohio) that've also experienced widespread fracking? The answer might be in the "basement," so to speak. Our guest is Dr. Brett Carpenter, an Assistant Professor of Geology and Geophysics at The University of Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST, we get to know photographer Dan Farnum, a Tulsa Artist Fellow who also teaches at the University of Tulsa School of Art. Originally from Michigan, Farnum now has a debut photography book coming out. It's titled "Young Blood," and it profiles children, teens, and young adults growing up amid the economic strife of Michigan's auto towns. Note: There will be a free-to-the-public book-release gathering for this volume at Magic City Books on Friday night, the 25th, beginning at 6:30pm.

Later this week, on the morning of October 24th, the Opportunity Project -- a Tulsa nonprofit that (per its website) acts as a "citywide intermediary for expanded learning [and for] connecting youth to the world of opportunity" -- will celebrate the 20th anniversary of National Lights On Afterschool Day. This celebration begins at 8:30am at the Central Center in Centennial Park, near 6th and Peoria, and it will include a presentation regarding "What Tulsa's Youth Need to Thrive" by Karen J. Pittman, co-founder and CEO of The Forum for Youth Investment.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. B.J. Miller, whose TED Talk entitled "What Really Matters at The End of Life" has had more than 9 million views. He's also the co-author of a newly released book, "A Beginner's Guide to the End: Practical Advice for Living Life and Facing Death." Dr. Miller -- one of the nation's pre-eminent speakers on patient-centered care, palliative treatment, and end-of-life care -- tells us about his new book: how and why he created it, and what he hopes to accomplish with it. Please note that Dr.

Our guest is the former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Samantha Power, who's widely known as a tireless human-rights advocate. She joins us to discuss her recently published memoir, "The Education of an Idealist." Later this month, on Tuesday the 29th, Ambassador Power will take part in an onstage conversation (and subsequent book signing) with Dr. John Schumann, President of OU-Tulsa, at Congregation B'nai Emunah.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we revisit our fascinating 2017 conversation with David Grann, the bestselling author and staff writer at The New Yorker Magazine. At that time, Grann was promoting his then-new book, "Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI" (which has been optioned for a much-talked-about film version). Grann will deliver a free-to-the-public Presidential Lecture here at TU on Tuesday the 22nd; his talk begins at 7:30pm in the Reynolds Center.

Our guest on ST is Margot Livesey, the Scottish-born, Boston-based writer whose work has earned a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, the PEN New England Award, and the Massachusetts Book Award. She tells us about two of her books, "The Hidden Machinery: Essays on Writing" and "Mercury: A Novel." Of the latter, the New York Times noted: "Livesey knows her way around human desire and disappointment. Like the recent blockbusters 'Gone Girl' and 'Fates and Furies,' 'Mercury' gives us a marriage from alternating perspectives.

Our guest is Eric Foner, the DeWitt Clinton Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University, who is a Pulitzer Prize–winning scholar and one of the most prominent historians in the United States. He'll give the free-to-the-public 23rd Annual John W. Hager Distinguished Lecture at the TU College of Law (at 3120 East 4th Place) on October 17th. (The reception for this event is at 5:30pm; the lecture begins at 6pm.) Prof.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Lori Melichar, a labor economist with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Per the RWJF website, Lori is "a senior director [who] focuses on discovering, exploring, and learning from cutting-edge ideas with the potential to help create a Culture of Health. She is also the host of the Foundation's Pioneering Ideas podcast.

On this edition of ST, we present a new installmwent in our popular Museum Confidential podcast series (which just began its third season). This time out, we learn about a **new** book from Dr. Seuss, which is just out, and which is based on an unfinished collection of notes and sketches that the brillitant children's book author and illustrator (who died in 1991) left behind in a drawer. The book, called "The Horse Museum," is a love letter to museums as well as a primer on art history.

Our guest is Tanvi Madan, a Senior Fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy in the Foreign Policy Program -- and also the Director of The India Project -- at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Her work centers upon India's role in the world and its foreign policy, focusing especially on the subcontinent's relations with China and the US. Madan recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations, the title of which referred to Narendra Modi, who's been the Prime Minister of India since 2014.

Our guests are the Harvard evolutionary biologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and the award-winning science writer Kathryn Bowers, who tell us about their jointly written new book, "Wildhood." It makes several fascinating connections between the lives and behaviors of teenage animals and those of teenage human beings. Per the Los Angeles Times: "The vivid storytelling and fascinating scientific digressions in [this book] make it a pleasurable read.

All of Washington, DC -- indeed, all of American politics -- has been in a frenzy ever since a whistleblower's complaint came to light, only a couple of weeks ago, regarding President Trump's July 25th phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Information about this call prompted House Democrats to begin their impeachment inquiry of the President, and now a second whistleblower is apparently coming forward (as well as, possibly, a third). On ST today, we look back on the history of whistleblowers in America. Our guest is Prof.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Ade Adamson, a board-certified dermatologist and assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the newly created Dell Medical School at UT-Austin. As noted at this "bio" page from the UT-Austin website, where you can also access a list of Dr. Adamson's articles: "His primary clinical interest is in caring for patients at high risk for melanoma of the skin, such as those with many moles (particularly atypical moles) or a personal and/or family history of melanoma.

Photo by Oil City News

Our guest is Ron Spigelman, who will conduct the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra during its next concert (happening tomorrow night, Saturday the 5th, at the Tulsa PAC). Opening with Rimsky-Korsakov's vivid "Capriccio Espagnol," the evening will also feature Mozart's "Posthorn Symphony" (or Serenade No. 9) and Debussy's swirling and colorful "Images." More info is posted here.

Our guest is the award-winning spoken word performer, Shane Koyczan, whose moving and furious yet also candid and disarming storytelling (and versifying) has impressed audiences all over the globe. Winner of both the U.S. Slam Poetry Championship and the Canadian Spoken Word Olympics, Koyczan will soon be performing here on the TU campus. He's being presented by OK SO Tulsa, a storytelling organization founded in 2013 that's dedicated to letting people tell their own true stories in a "live onstage" setting.

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