StudioTulsa on 89.5-1

Weekdays 11:30am and 7:30pm
  • Hosted by Rich Fisher

StudioTulsa features down-to-earth interviews that make sense of complex issues and offer new perspectives on topics we might take for granted. It's an award-winning program covering the arts, sciences, news events, books, politics, culture, economics, history, social trends, the media, the humanities, and so forth --- and it's been a popular show here at Public Radio Tulsa ever since it began in August of 1992.

Medical Mondays with Dr. John Schumann are heard each Monday.

The program is hosted by Rich Fisher and produced/edited by Scott Gregory.

Visit the StudioTulsa Archives.

Our guest is the Oklahoma-based author, attorney, and legal scholar Walter Echo-Hawk.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about Tulsa Little Jam, a popular podcast, concert series, and far-reaching digital media platform that aims to spotlight our community's most talented musicians and singer-songwriters. Tulsa Little Jam will present its Season Two Opening Concert this coming Friday night, the 17th, at Guthrie Green (beginning at 5:30pm). A number of different local bands will be presented -- and filmed -- in live performance, and the concert will be part of the 2019 Mayfest weekend.

The highly acclaimed novelist Rachel Kushner is our guest; she joins us to discuss her latest novel, "The Mars Room," which is now out in paperback. As was noted of this book (which was Time Magazine's #1 Fiction Title of the Year as well as a New York Times Notable Book of 2018) in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Two-time National Book Award finalist Kushner delivers a heartbreaking and unforgettable novel set in a California women's prison.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Bob Hudson, a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics with the OU School of Community Medicine in Tulsa. He's practiced general pediatrics for the past 30 years -- and has spent the past 16 years as a behavioral pediatrician, helping parents whose children exhibit behavioral or learning problems. Dr.

The acclaimed journalist and bestselling author Daniel Okrent is our guest; he tells us about his new book, "The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out of America." This book looks back to the 1920s is reveal a dark and forgotten chapter of American history -- a troubling era with serious implications for the present day.

This weekend, from May 9th through the 12th, Tulsa Ballet will present a season-closing Signature Series program titled "From Ballet to Broadway." It's a line-up of three works that, each and all, deeply blend classical ballet with Broadway-style dance and movement.

Our guest is Keith Elder, who has recently been named the new executive director of the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra. Elder, who will assume his new job in August, comes to the TSO from the Aspen Music Festival and School, which is widely seen as one of America's top classical music festivals. A tuba player by training, Elder was the general manager and vice president in Aspen; he's also worked with the Eastman School of Music and the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

Our guest is the British scholar Thomas Lockley, an Associate Professor at Nihon University College of Law in Tokyo, where he teaches courses related to the international and multicultural history of Japan and East Asia. He's also the co-author of a new biography titled "African Samurai: The True Story of Yasuke, a Legendary Black Warrior in Feudal Japan," which he tells about. The book offers the remarkable life of history's first foreign-born samurai...and his astonishing journey from Northeast Africa to the heights of Japanese society.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we welcome Dr. Sunita Puri, who tells us about her "visceral and lyrical" (The Atlantic) new memoir, a book that delves thoughtfully and artfully into medicine and spirituality. "That Good Night: Life and Medicine in the Eleventh Hour" finds Puri telling her own story, as the ambitious American-born daughter of immigrants, as well as the story of her parents: what they did for her, gave to her, and shared with her.

The 22nd Annual Yom HaShoah, which is a yearly Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration, will happen in Tulsa on Monday the 6th at Temple Israel (located at 2004 E. 22nd Place). The event begins at 7pm and is free to the public. This year's gathering, co-presented by the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education and the Tulsa City-County Library, is titled "Survival in the Shadows: Hidden Children of the Holocaust." Our guest on ST is the keynote speaker for this gathering: Abraham H.

Each year, the Anne V. Zarrow Award for Young Readers' Literature is given by the TCCL's Tulsa Library Trust to a nationally acclaimed author who has made a significant contribution to the field of literature for young adults. This year, that award will go to Rita Williams-Garcia, our guest today on ST. She is being recognized, as noted at the TCCL website, "for writing bestselling novels for young adults that inspire imaginations, dreams, and pride in all ages.

Our guest is Mallory O'Meara, an author, screenwriter, and film producer who lives and works in Los Angeles. She tells us about her new book, which is a biography of Milicent Patrick -- one of Disney's first female animators and the only woman in history to create one of Hollywood's classic movie monsters: The Creature from the Black Lagoon. As was noted of this volume in a starred review in BookPage: "Fascinating....

(Note: This interview originally aired back in November.) News flash: Cats do not meow at random. Nor do they hiss because they have nothing better to do. Cat sounds do have a purpose -- and they can carry important messages. But what ARE those messages? Our guest has some interesting answers: Susanne Schötz, a professor at Lund University in Sweden, is part of a long-standing research program exploring how and why cats use vocal communication...with each other and with their human caretakers.

More and more people these days are getting interested in -- and are, in fact, adopting -- a plant-based lifestyle. Healthy eating, healthy cooking, healthy living, and just taking more control over one's health, period: these practices all seem to be increasingly "mainstream" in America today. And so, in that spirit, the first-ever Tulsa VegFest will happen on Saturday the 4th at Guthrie Green in downtown Tulsa. The event is free to all, running from 10am to 4pm, and it will feature speakers from around the U.S.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the acclaimed poet and writing instructor Quraysh Ali Lansana (born 1964 in Enid, Oklahoma). Now based in Tulsa and recently named a Tulsa Artist Fellow, Lansana has published several books over the years: poetry collections, children's books, edited or co-edited anthologies, textbooks, etc. Long based in Chicago, and greatly influenced by the African-American cultural, social, and political life of that city -- and more generally, by the Black Arts Movement in American life and letters -- Lansana has a new book out.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we offer another episode of our twice-monthly Museum Confidential podcast (which is co-created by Jeff Martin with Philbrook Museum of Art and our own Scott Gregory). This time out, MC speaks with Graham Boettcher, Director of the Birmingham Museum of Art in Birmingham, Alabama. Boettcher has recently been looking at that museum's troubling Jim Crow-era policies, which occurred in the first dozen years of its existence.

On this edition of our show, we learn about the nonprofit known as Connected Kids, which, per its webiste, "believes that every child needs and deserves connection. It is essential to overcoming trauma and becoming courageous, purposeful, self-directed, and independent. And it is possible! With the right tools and support, we can build healing connections with children who have been through even the darkest of circumstances." This organization was founded by Rr. Barbara Sorrels, who is our guest today.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the nonprofit Harmony Project, a long-running (and highly successful) music-based mentoring program that provides academic tutoring, instruments, and music lessons to at-risk students (in grades K through 12) nationwide. The program was begun in 2001 in Los Angeles -- as a "public-health intervention" -- by Dr. Margaret Martin, who is our guest today. There are by now several different Harmony Project Affiliates -- in New Orleans, Kansas City, East St.

(Note: This installment of ST Medical Monday originally aired last summer.) It's taken a while for this particular truth to sink in, but America finally seems to be waking up to it: People with mental illness don't need to be locked up -- they need to be treated. On this edition of our show, we speak with journalist Alisa Roth, whose book, "Insane," is a well-regarded and alarming exposé of the mental health crisis now facing our courts, jails, and prisons. As was noted  of this book by The New York Times Book Review: "Chilling....

On this edition of ST, we learn about two new plays to be presented on April 19, 20, 26, and 27 at the Nightingale Theater here in Tulsa, at 1416 East 4th Street. Heller Theatre Company recently opted to stage two one-act plays (in a single evening) by a pair of Tulsa-based playwrights in order to continue its ongoing mission to support original dramatic work, and thus Heller is offering "Trade Privileges" (written by David Blakely) and "Niñas de la Tierra" (written and directed by Shadia Dahlal).

This coming Saturday (the 20th) will bring a free, day-long Earth Day Celebration to the Guthrie Green in downtown Tulsa; the gathering is to be presented by Tulsa Earth Coalition, Green Country Sierra Club, and OK Roots Music -- and a full schedule is posted here.

Has the Trump Administration strengthened our nation's position on the global stage -- or are we now, as a country, weaker in terms of international geopolitics? On this broadcast of ST, we welcome James Lindsay, Senior Vice President at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he oversees the work of the more than six dozen fellows in the David Rockefeller Studies Program. Lindsay is considered a leading authority on the American foreign policy-making process and on the domestic politics of U.S. foreign policy.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Carol Haralson. A former citizen of Tulsa, she is an award-winning book designer now based in Arizona. She's designed several striking book jackets over the years, across a range of literary genres. And Haralson's now written a book of her own -- a blend of memoir, fiction, poetry, personal essay, and photography titled "At the Far End of O Street." She'll appear tomorrow night, Wednesday the 17th, at a free reading and signing at Magic City Books (beginning at 7pm).

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Lori Gottlieb, who tells us about her bestselling new memoir, "Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed." As was noted of this book by a critic writing for The New York Times: "Gottlieb's book is perhaps the first I've read that explains the therapeutic process in no-nonsense terms while simultaneously giving hope to therapy skeptics like me who think real change through talk is elusive." And further, per The Washington Post: "Who could resist watching a therapist grapple with the same questions her patients have

We chat with the acclaimed English conductor Matthew Halls, who will be the Guest Conductor for the next Tulsa Symphony Orchestra concert, happening tomorrow night (the 13th) at the Tulsa PAC. The program will feature Rachmaninoff's "Symphonic Dances" as well as works by Strauss and Piazolla. More on this concert is posted here.

Our guest is the well-regarded Pennsylvania-based poet, Ron Silliman, who has written and edited over 30 books, and who is seen as one of the founders of the so-called Language Poetry movement in American literature. A 2003 Literary Fellow of the National Endowment for the Arts, Silliman also received the Levinson Prize from the Poetry Foundation in 2010 (among many other honors). He'll be reading from and talking about his work tonight (the 11th) as part of the 2nd Annual TulsaLitFest.

(Note: This interview first aired back in November.) Our guest is the noted playwright, Sarah Ruhl, a Tony Award nominee and the author of "100 Essays I Don't Have Time to Write," which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She tells us about her newest book, a collection of moving and insightful letters between herself and Max Ritvo (1990-2016). Ruhl teaches at the Yale School of Drama, and Ritvo, a noted poet who died young of cancer, had been one of her favorite students.

Our guest is the veteran and award-winning Oklahoma journalist, John Wylie, former publisher of the Oologah Lake Leader. He recently wrote a blog post -- headlined "Mother Earth's Guardian Angel or Corporate Greed"s Satanic Shield?" -- about the controversy surrounding the now-under-consideration Senate Bill 1003, which would protect internal corporate environmental, health, and safety audits from public exposure or even court view.

When we refer to "implicit bias" in today's world, we mean those unconscious stereotypes or automatic assessments that we all make -- all of us -- about people of a race, color, or background that differs from our own. What happens when implicit bias occurs among doctors, nurses, or other medical experts? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Jabraan Pasha with the OU-TU School of Community Medicine, where he is Associate Program Director for Internal Medicine and Faculty Director of Student Recruitment. Dr.

Laid Time Table with Cycads (detail) by Beth Lipman

On this edition of ST, we speak with the noted contemporary artist, Beth Lipman, who is known for her intricate and even breathtaking glass work. Her show, "Beth Lipman: Accidental Vestiges," opens today (the 5th) at 108 Contemporary as part of the First Friday Art Crawl in downtown Tulsa. An artist who employs a craft-making process -- and a great deal of glass -- in order to emulate or evoke such traditional "still life" subjects as food, books, and table arrangements, Lipman uses crystal materials in new and thoughtful ways.

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