StudioTulsa on 89.5-1

Weekdays 11:30am and 7:30pm
  • Hosted by Rich Fisher

StudioTulsa features down-to-earth interviews that make sense of complex issues and offer new perspectives on topics we might take for granted. It's an award-winning program covering the arts, sciences, news events, books, politics, culture, economics, history, social trends, the media, the humanities, and so forth --- and it's been a popular show here at Public Radio Tulsa ever since it began in August of 1992.

Medical Mondays with Dr. John Schumann are heard each Monday.

The program is hosted by Rich Fisher and produced/edited by Scott Gregory.

Visit the StudioTulsa Archives.

Through the seven week Oklahoma opioid trial against pharmaceutical company, Johnson & Johnson, there was only one reporter on hand for every single day of the trial, and that was State Impact Oklahoma's Jackie Fortier. She joins us on this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, to talk about the trial, and the most effective arguments made by the Attorney General's office and the company's defense team.

As readers anxiously await the final volume of Hilary Mantel's trilogy on novels on the life of 16th Century royal advisor Thomas Cromwell, we bring you a conversation from December 2018, when Mantel received the Peggy V Helmerich Distinguished Author Award.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is a Wharton professor and tech entrepreneur whose new book examines how algorithms and artificial intelligence are starting to run just about every single aspect of our lives.  Kartik Hosanagar is our guest, he's the author of "A Human's Guide to Machine Intelligence: How Algorithms Are Shaping Our Lives and How We Can Stay in Control." Hosanagar says algorithms are doing more than shaping our Netflix and Amazon recommendations. They're assisting HR executives in who gets a job interview, or criminal justice officials on who gets probation or parole.

A hundred years ago in a dusty courtyard in Amritsar, India, a horrific massacre took place when British Raj troops opened fire on thousands of unarmed men, women, and children attending a peaceful demonstration. 1650 rounds of ammunition were expended, most hit their targets. As many as a thousand died. Today, outside of Jallianwala Bagh, as its called, there's a statue of a man, with a defiant expression, holding a clod of earth in his outstretched hand.

US Public Health Service working in Haiti after 2010 earthquake
US Public Health Service

Over the years, the U.S. Uniformed Public Health Service has contributed to containing pandemics in Africa, preventing disease outbreaks after natural disasters,  and helping move forward public health initiatives like the Clean Air Act or the Safe Drinking Water Act, but it also has been criticized for its role in the notorious Tuskegee syphillis study which followed African-Americans with the disease for decades, even after penicillin was known to cure the illness. Today, there are proposals to slash the funding for this organization, or eliminate it altogether. Our guest is Dr.

Today we welcome Sterlin Harjo back to StudioTulsa. The celebrated locally-based filmmaker has a new movie, which he tells us about. It's a documentary short called "Terlton," and it'll have its world premiere this coming Saturday, the 13th, as part of the 2019 Circle Cinema Film Festival. "Terlton" takes us back to the summer of 1985, when a small town in Oklahoma -- incredibly, and so sadly -- lost a full one-fourth of its population when an explosion happened at a local fireworks factory.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn all about the vitally important book/author/reading series known as Book Smart Tulsa, which was started ten years ago (pretty much single-handedly) by our guest, Jeff Martin. He worked for years as a local bookseller and is now the Communications Manager at Philbrook Museum of Art; he's also the co-creator of our popular Museum Confidential podcast here at Public Radio Tulsa.

After debuting last year as part of the Circle Cinema's 90th birthday bash, the Circle Cinema Film Festival is back in 2019 with a rich assortment of films as well as various art, music, and cultural experiences. Our guests are Clark Wiens, a founder of the Circle Cinema Foundation, and Chuck Foxen, the film programmer at the Circle. They tell us about many of the films and special guests who come to Tulsa as a part of this gala festival, which happens from the 11th through the 15th.

On this edition of ST, we hear about an Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition (or OVAC) program that supports young professionals interested in a career as a curator, an art critic, an arts-based journalist, or the like. Through its Oklahoma Art Writing & Curatorial Fellowsship, OVAC has helped several individuals hone their writing and/or curatorial skills, which has culminated in a special "Curatorial Lab" series of exhibits happening at the Henry Zarrow Center for Art & Education in downtown Tulsa.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Donna Thomson, who is a co-author of "The Unexpected Journey of Caring: The Transformation from Loved One to Caregiver." As was noted of this important new guidebook by Booklist: "Caregivers often sacrifice their own health and relationships to take care of loved ones, which is a big problem in the United States, where nearly 45 million Americans provide unpaid care to an adult or child with medical problems or chronic conditions.

(Note: This interview originally aired last summer.) Our guest is Kendra Taira Field, an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University.

Our guest is Susan Green, a curator at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. She's the local curator for a traveling show now at Philbrook's main campus -- "Wondrous Worlds: Art & Islam Through Time & Place" will be on view through October 6th. Per the Philbrook website, it is "the most extensive exhibition of Islamic art to be shown in Oklahoma, [and it] represents over 1,200 years of rich artistic creation, illustrating the great geographic expanse of the Islamic world.

Our guest is Russell Gold, who has reported on energy regularly in The Wall Street Journal since 2002; his coverage of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was honored with a Gerald Loeb Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Gold joins us to discuss his new book, "Superpower: One Man's Quest to Transform American Energy." This book profiles Michael Skelly, an infrastructure builder who began working on wind energy in 2000, back when many people considered the entire wind-power industry a joke.

In 2013, Dr. Ayaz Virji left a comfortable job at an East Coast hospital and moved to a medical facility in a small town in Minnesota; he felt personally driven -- indeed, he felt called -- to address the dire shortage of doctors in rural America. But in 2016, his choice to relocate was tested when the reliably blue and working-class county where he lived swung for Donald Trump. Leading up to and following Trump's election, Dr. Virji  was shocked to suddenly see his children facing anti-Muslim remarks at school.

On this installment of our show, we learn about "Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea," which is on view at the Tulsa Zoo through Jan. 5, 2020. This newly opened exhibit features art works made entirely of plastic debris collected from the world's beaches. The show -- which travels to venues all over the planet -- was created by the non-profit organization Washed Ashore, a group that is dedicated to educating everyone about plastic pollution through art. Our guest is John Tannous, a spokesman for Washed Ashore.

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest is Frans de Waal, a professor in Emory University's Psychology Department as well as the director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. He joins us to discuss his book, "Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves." Per The New York Times Book Review, the book is "game-changing.... For too long, emotion has been cognitive researchers' third rail.... But nothing could be more essential to understanding how people and animals behave.

(Please note: This edition of ST originally aired back in March.) Our guest is Mitchell S. Jackson, whose new book is an autobiographical collection of essays called "Survival Math: Notes on an All-American Family." As was noted by The Boston Globe, it's a "vibrant memoir of race, violence, family, and manhood.... Jackson recognizes there is too much for one conventional form, and his various storytelling methods imbue the book with an unpredictable dexterity.

Our guest is Larry Diamond, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. He is also a past director of Stanford's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Diamond joins us to discus his new book, "Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency." As was noted by Gary J. Bass in The New York Times Book Review: "[Diamond] has spent 40 years circumnavigating the globe promoting democracy in Nigeria, Venezuela, and some 70 other countries. Yet today he is aghast....

(Please note: This edition of ST Medical Monday originally aired back in January.) Today we offer a conversation with two community leaders who are both involved with the Tulsa Community Service Council, and who are both, moreover, U.S. Military veterans: Dr. Erv Janssen and Jim Lyall. They join us to define and discuss the experience known as moral injury -- an affliction that's similar to post-traumatic stress disorder, yet which also differs from PTSD in several important ways.

Our guests on this edition of ST are Laura Fry, Senior Curator of the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa, and Carolyn Sickles, Executive Dirtector of the Tulsa Artist Fellowship. These two outstanding, arts-based organizations are now jointly offering "Recall/Respond," a contemporary arts exhibition that presents work by current Tulsa Artist Fellows as well as TAF alumni.

Many of us living here in Oklahoma -- and indeed, living all over the nation -- are today both pleased and proud to affirm that Joy Harjo, the much-celebrated, 68-year-old writer and musician based in Tulsa, was recently named by the Library of Congress as the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States. A member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, Harjo is the first Native person to be selected for this honorable role. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a conversation that we aired with Harjo in 2012, when her well-regarded memoir, "Crazy Brave," had just appeared.

Our guest is Elliot Ackerman, the author of several widely-acclaimed novels who's also a former Marine; he served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. Ackerman joins us to discuss his new book, a collection of autobiographical essays called "Places and Names: On War, Revolution, and Returning." Per a starred review of this volume in Booklist: "[A] searing, contemplative, and unforgettable memoir-in-essays....

(Note: This interview first aired last October.) As a young black man, RJ Young grew up with a healthy distrust of guns, but when he married into a family deeply immersed in America's gun culture, he knew he would have to learn about them -- at least, to a certain degree. Today, the Tulsa-based Young (who works as a sports-radio host) is a certified NRA pistol instructor...yet he doesn't carry a gun.

Our guest is Matt McCarthy, MD, a bestselling author, assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell, and staff physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he also serves on the Ethics Committee. He joins ST Medical Monday to discuss his new book, "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic." As was noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "A riveting insider's look at the race to find a cure for antibiotic-resistant infections, one of the most pressing challenges in modern medicine....

"Babe Ruth's Final Farewell" -- Nathaniel Fein, New York Herald Tribune, June 13, 1948, New York, N.Y.; Nathaniel Fein/New York Herald Tribune/Nat Fein Estate.

On this edition of ST, we learn about "Pulitzer Prize Photographs," a moving and far-ranging show on view through July 14th at Tulsa's Gilcrease Museum (and on loan from the Newseum in Washington, DC). Per the Gilcrease wesbite, this exhibtion "brings history to life with the most comprehensive collection of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs ever assembled, with images of every prize-winning entry dating back to 1942, when the award was first presented.

StudioTulsa today offers another edition of the popular Museum Confidential podcast, which is co-created twice a month by our own Scott Gregory with Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum of Art. Recently, Scott and Jeff trekked down to the Big Easy to offer a "live & onstage" presentation of Museum Confidential as part of the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) annual meeting. Their guest was Don Wildman, host of the long-running Travel Channel show, "Mysteries at the Museum."

Our guest is James F. Hollifield, a Professor of Political Science and Academic Director of the Tower Center at Southern Methodist University (SMU) in Dallas, Texas; he's also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (TCFR) titled "Back to the Future: Trump's Migration Policies and the New Nativism." Dr.

(Note: This interview originally aired last fall.) Our guest is Linda Kay Klein, whose detailed and engrossing new memoir looks at the devastating effects that evangelical Christianity's purity culture has had on a generation of young women in America. Back in the 1990s, the widespread white evangelical Christian culture created a "purity movement" of sorts -- purity rings, purity pledges, purity balls, etc. Girls were seen by this movement as potential sexual "stumbling blocks" for boys and men, and any expression of a girl's sexuality could be judged as a corruption of her character.

(Note: This interview originally aired in March.) If you follow the world of sports and fitness, you might know that "recovery" has become quite the buzzword. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're exploring the hype as well as the science behind various recovery products -- such as power bars, energy shakes, foam rollers, electrical muscle stimulators, etc. Our guest is the noted science writer Christie Aschwanden, whose new book is "Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery."

Pages