StudioTulsa on 89.5-1

Weekdays 11:30am and 7:30pm
  • Hosted by Rich Fisher

StudioTulsa features down-to-earth interviews that make sense of complex issues and offer new perspectives on topics we might take for granted. It's an award-winning program covering the arts, sciences, news events, books, politics, culture, economics, history, social trends, the media, the humanities, and so forth --- and it's been a popular show here at Public Radio Tulsa ever since it began in August of 1992.

Medical Mondays with Dr. John Schumann are heard each Monday.

The program is hosted by Rich Fisher and produced/edited by Scott Gregory.

Visit the StudioTulsa Archives.

Our guests today are the co-authors of an engrossing new book that blends true crime, memoir, and investigative reportage. Liza Rodman and Jennifer Jordan join us to talk about "The Babysitter: My Summers with a Serial Killer." This book details the life of a neglected young girl growing up in the Cape Cod region of the late 1960s, revealing in particular how she developed a friendship with her charismatic yet off-beat babysitter -- a man who, as she learned years later, was actually a serial killer.

(Note: This discussion first aired in October of last year.) Our guest is the well-regarded historian and author Peter Cozzens, who joins us to talk about his book, "Tecumseh and the Prophet: The Shawnee Brothers Who Defied a Nation." This book argues that Tecumseh was actually a co-leader of sorts of the Shawnee tribe with his often-misunderstood younger brother, the shaman-like Tenskwatawa.

On this edition of ST, we remember Roger Mudd, the late political correspondent and probing television news anchor/reporter. Active in American TV journalism for more than three decades, he died last week at age 93. We spoke with Mudd in 2008, and we replay that discussion on today's show.

Serae Avance (American, b. 1993). Knowledge and Struggle, 2021. Digital pigment print. Courtesy of the artist. Copyright Serae Avance.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a show that recently opened at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. "From the Limitations of Now" will be on view through September 5th.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is journalist and author Larry Olmsted, who tells us about his latest book, "Fans: How Watching Sports Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Understanding." The book cites a wide range of new and recent studies on the topic of sports fandom, thus arguing that the more we root for a given sports team, the better our social, psychological, and physical health is likely to be -- and the more meaningful our personal relationships will be, and the more connected and happier we will feel overall.

Fifty years ago, in March of 1971, a group of activists calling itself the "Citizens' Commission to Investigate the FBI" broke into a small FBI office in Pennsylvania and stole more than 1,000 classified documents. They then anonymously mailed the documents to several U.S. newspapers, thereby exposing numerous illegal FBI operations vis a vis domestic surveillance. On this edition of ST, we revisit our 2014 conversation with Betty Medsger, a former Washington Post journalist who wrote a book detailing this incident. That book is "The Burglary: The Discovery of J.

Our guest is Kevin Brockmeier, an imaginative and acclaimed writer based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Carolyn Sickles, the Executive Director of Tulsa Artist Fellowship, or TAF, which is an arts-and-community-focused project of the George Kaiser Family Foundation. The TAF recently announced that it has given 22 of its fellows an Arts Integration Award for 2020-2021, which is meant to help these artists further their involvement with (and presence within) the Tulsa community via new works, new series, and so on. The award includes a $25,000 stipend, $10,000 in project resources, and also free living and work spaces.

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Our guest is the writer Simon Han, who was born in China, grew up in Texas, and was formerly a Tulsa Artist Fellow. He joins us to discuss his novel, "Nights When Nothing Happened." As was noted of this tender, perceptive coming-of-age saga in a starred review in Kirkus: "Han expertly shifts the ground under the narrative, constantly shaking the snow globe to nudge the reader's perspective away from the familiar.... [The book's] characters are authentic, vulnerable, and utterly convincing, delivering one dynamite novel.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saray Stancic. In 1995, she learned that she had multiple sclerosis. By 2003, she was walking regularly with a cane, had stopped nearly all unnecessary physical activity, and was on several medications. Flash forward to 2010, when she ran a marathon.... How'd she do this? It didn't happen overnight, of course, but -- through a series of dedicated lifestyle changes -- it did happen. Dr.

(Note: This interview first aired in September of 2020.) Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her latest book, which is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

Our guest is Marcello Angelini, the Artistic Director of Tulsa Ballet. From March 5th through the 14th, the company will once again offer a Signature Series at Studio K three-part program (which will be accessible in both online/streamable presentations as well as in-person/socially-distanced shows at the Studio K performance space in Tulsa's Brookside neighborhood). The series will include two newly-made World Premieres and a piece that was created just for Tulsa Ballet. These three ballets will be the work of choreographers Andrew McNicol, Yury Yanowsky, and Jennifer Archibald.

We are pleased to welcome Joy Harjo back to StudioTulsa. The poet, writer, performer, and musician is the current United State Poet Laureate. She's also a Tulsa resident, and a Tulsa Artist Fellow. A member of the Mvskoke/Creek Nation, she started writing as a young woman and started playing saxophone in her forties -- by now, she's well-regarded and widely celebrated in both capacities. Harjo joins us to discuss her new album, "I Pray for My Enemies," which is the first new recording of her music to appear in a decade.

Photo of Claudio Saunt by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

Our guest is Claudio Saunt, a professor of American History at the University of Georgia. He'll soon deliver the 2021 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture at the University of Tulsa. His talk -- which will be offered as a digital/livestream/online-only event on March 4th (starting at 7pm) at utulsa.edu/cadenhead-settle -- will explore how slavery and indigenous dispossession effectively built the Antebellum South.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the National Center for Wellness & Recovery, which is based at the OSU Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa. The mission for this facility, per its website, is "to inspire hope and to develop innovative, science-driven treatment interventions to improve the lives of those afflicted by pain and substance-use disorders." Our guest is Dr. Kelly Dunn, a psychiatrist who is also the Executive Director for Clinical Treatment at the National Center.

(Note: This interview first aired back in October.) We welcome Sarah Smarsh back to StudioTulsa for a discussion of her latest book. It's a collection of essays that all focus on a certain country-music icon who also happens to be one of the most unifying figures in American culture: Dolly Parton. Smarsh talks with us about how Parton has, for decades now, both embodied and emboldened American women who live and work in poverty.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is the well-regarded African-American composer Adolphus Hailstork, who is based in Virginia. His music will be part of the program for a special broadcast-only concert to be presented by the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra on Saturday (the 27th) at 8pm -- with a re-airing on Sunday (the 28th) at 4pm. This concert will be a celebration of Black History Month, and it will air on our sister-station, Classical 88.7 KWTU-FM. More details are posted here.

Our guest is Kayleen Schaefer, a journalist and author who has written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and other publications. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "But You're Still So Young: How Thirtysomethings Are Redefining Adulthood." The book looks carefully at how thirtysomethings in America today are -- and aren't -- meeting the milestones which sociologists commonly cite as the five markers of adulthood: finishing school, leaving home, marriage, gaining financial independence, and having kids.

Our guest is the writer Andrea Pitzer, who tells us about her newest book. It's a page-turning work of history about the Dutch polar explorer William Barents, one of the 16th century's greatest navigators. In particular, "Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World" details the three harrowing Arctic expeditions that Barents led, the last of which resulted in an extremely challenging year-long fight for survival. As was noted by The Wall Street Journal: "A fascinating modern telling of Barents's expeditions.... Ms.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. T. Colin Campbell, who has been for more than four decades a leading expert on nutrition research in American medicine. His bestselling book from several years ago, "The China Study," grew out of the most comprehensive study of health and nutrition ever conducted, which he led. Dr. Campbell joins us to discuss both his pioneering career and his newest book, "The Future of Nutrition: An Insider's Look at the Science, Why We Keep Getting It Wrong, and How to Start Getting It Right."

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome Bassem Youssef, the Egyptian comedian, media critic, TV host...and former surgeon and doctor. He came to widespread attention as the host of "El-Bernameg" ("The Show"), a popular satirical news program in Egypt, which aired from 2011 to 2014. (His work on this program, which grw out of the Arab Spring, led to Youssef's being widely compared to the American satirist Jon Stewart.) Youssef joins us to discuss the development of his career thus far, which now includes a new children's book: "The Magical Reality of Nadia."

Our guest, Amelia Pang, is an award-winning investigative journalist who's written for "Mother Jones," "The New Republic," and other publications. In her new book, "Made in China," she profiles an political prisoner named Sun Yi, who was forced into harsh labor by the Chinese government for campaigning for the right to join a forbidden meditation movement.

Our guest is the writer and film historian Mark Harris, whose newest book, which he tells us about, is a biography of Mike Nichols (1931-2014). Born Mikhail Igor Peschkowsky in Berlin, the young Nichols, along with his brother and his parents, escaped the Nazis in 1939 by relocating to the United States. Nichols went on to have a long, remarkably creative career in show business, thriving as a film and theater director, actor, producer, and comedian. As a director, he was known and celebrated for helping his actors deliver particularly strong performances.

Our guest is Michelle Commander, an Associate Director and Curator at The Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture, which is a branch of the New York Public Library located in Harlem. The Schomberg Center has recently put out a pathbreaking new anthology, which she tells us about. The book is "Unsung: Unheralded Narratives of American Slavery and Abolition." It's a thorough and well-edited volume that traces gathers various writings and texts in order to convey the full historical arc of transatlantic slavery in the US.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer a discussion of what is commonly referred to as "long-haul syndrome" or "long COVID." Our guest is Dr. Stan Schwartz, who's the chief medical officer of The Zero Card, a digital-health enterprise. He's also a former medical director of Tulsa's Warren Clinic. Dr.

Our guest is Dr. Michael F. Myers, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University in Brooklyn, New York. He's the author or co-author of several works, including "Why Physicians Die by Suicide." Dr. Myers joins us on StudioTulsa Medical Monday for a discussion of his new book, "Becoming a Doctors' Doctor: A Memoir." As was noted of this reflective and readable work by Dr.

Our guest is the Tulsa-based writer, creative writing teacher, playwright, and performer, Michael Wright. He's had an active, far-flung career in the dual worlds of literature and theatre. The author of novels, plays, poems, and varous performance-art and spoken-word experiments, Wright was also the 2010 Playwriting Teacher of the Year for the Association for Theatre in Higher Education and the winner of the Kennedy Center 2011 Milan Stitt Award for outstanding teaching and professional work in playwriting.

Our guest is the British author Jenny Lecoat. She's just published her debut novel, which she tells us about. "The Girl from the Channel Islands" is a compelling saga that happens to employ, at least in part, her own family's history. As was noted by Publishers Weekly: "Lecoat...draws on the history of Germany's WWII occupation of Jersey, one of the Channel Islands, where [she] was raised. During the summer of 1940, Hedy Bercu is living on Jersey after having escaped Nazi-occupied Vienna.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Robert Draper is our guest; he is a writer at large for The New York Times Magazine and a contributing writer to National Geographic. His past books include the bestselling "Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W.

WGBH Boston

Our guest on ST is the documentary filmmaker, Sam Pollard, who directed "Goin' Back to T-Town." This remarkable film, which dates from the early 1990s, tells the then-nearly-forgotten-but-now-familiar story of Greenwood, the "Black Wall Street" neighborhood in Tulsa which prospered during the early 20th century, and which was all but erased in 1921 by one of the worst race-driven massacres in U.S. history. "Goin' Back to T-Town" will be shown next week (on Monday the 8th) on PBS television.

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