John Henning Schumann

Our guest is Dr. Michael Roizen, the bestselling author and Chief Wellness Officer at the Cleveland Clinic. He's also the co-author of "The What to Eat When Cookbook," which is just out, and which builds upon a previous (and very popular) guidebook that he co-wrote called "What to Eat When." In both volumes, Dr. Roizen points out that **when** we eat (that is, what time of day) is actually crucial to the link between a healthy diet and healthy living. It's also crucial to disease prevention, better overall mental/physical performance, and a longer life. As Dr.

Throughout the week, we've been spotlighting some standout StudioTulsa interviews from last year.

Welcome to The Best of StudioTulsa in 2020. All week, we'll be listening back to some standout interviews that originally aired last year.

Our guest is Dr. Jeff Spiess, who has been caring for seriously and terminally ill patients for 30+ years, first as an oncologist, and later in the realm of hospice medicine. (In 2016, the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine named him as a recipient of the Josephina B. Magno Distinguished Hospice Physician Award.) Dr. Spiess joins us to discuss his new book, which is just out. It's called "Dying with Ease: A Compassionate Guide to Making Wiser End of Life Decisions." More about this title is posted here.

Our guest is the author and doctor Michael Stein, who's also a professor of health law, policy, and management at Boston University. He tells us about his new book, which presents the many various moving, sobering, genuine, and often heartbreaking accounts of his patients about money...and about having (or not having) enough money to simply get by in the U.S. today. "Broke" gives us the words and thoughts of those now facing the reality of having to choose between getting medical treatments or paying their bills. As was noted of this book by Dr.

Our guest is Dr. Anne Hallward, the host and founder of Safe Space Radio. She is also a board-certified psychiatrist in Portland, Maine. Formerly on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and Cambridge Hospital, Dr. Hallward co-designed and taught courses on death and dying, cultural competence, sexuality, and psychiatric interviewing; she also published on death and dying, cultural bias in medicine, sexuality, and issues related to hunger.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dawn Mauricio, who's been practicing and studying vipassanā meditation since 2005, and who now works as a meditation retreat teacher. (You'll find her online at dawnmauricio.com.) She joins us to discuss her new book, "Mindfulness Meditation for Beginners: 50 Meditations to Practice Awareness, Acceptance, and Peace." As was noted of this book by Jack Kornfield, the author of "A Path with Heart": "[This is] an elegantly simple, wise, and practical approach to mindfulness.

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in September.) It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr.

Our guest is Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett, a noted expert on both psychology and neuroscience who's also a University Distinguished Professor at Northeastern University in Boston. She tells us about her new book, "Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain." As was noted of this book in a starred review in Kirkus: "An excellent education in brain science.... [Feldman Barrett] deftly employs metaphor and anecdote to deliver an insightful overview of her favorite subject....

Velvet Brown-Watts, a locally-based advocate for Sickle Cell Awareness and Treatment, and her son, Jeremiah Watts, Jr. (Photo used by permission of the Watts family.)

November is National Caregiver Awareness Month, and in that regard, our guests on this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday are Velvet Brown-Watts and Jeremiah Watts, Sr. They are the caregivers for, and the parents of, Jeremiah Watts, Jr., who is a 16-year-old student attending Union Public Schools here in our community, and who was diagnosed with Sickle Cell as an infant. Velvet Brown-Watts and Jeremiah Watts, Sr., are also the co-founders of a nonprofit called Supporters of Families with Sickle Cell Disease, which they tell us about.

Our guest is Chicago-based therapist and social worker, Joey Miller, MSW, LCSW, who has counseled women and their families for nearly two decades. She joins us to discuss her important new book, "Rebirth: The Journey of Pregnancy After a Loss." (You can learn more about, or contact, Joey Miller here.) A much-needed guidebook concerning a subject that many find difficult to talk about -- let alone deal with or confront -- "Rebirth" explains the challenges mothers and their partners can face after the loss of an infant.

In late 2015, Zac Easter, a young man from a small town in Iowa, took his own life. The reason? According to the many journals and detailed writings that Zac left behind, this act of suicide was chosen by Zac because he was unable to continue his long-running battle against worsening traumatic brain injuries -- injuries that stemmed directly from the fact that Zac had been a football player, from third grade through high school.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Benjamin Lorr, a writer based in New York City. He tells us about his interesting new book, "The Secret Life of Groceries: The Dark Miracle of the American Supermarket." As Lorr writes in the Introduction for this work: "This book is about the grocery store. About the people who work there and the routes of supply that define it. It is the product of five years of research, hundreds of interviews, and thousands of hours tracking down and working alongside the buyers, brokers, marketers, and managers whose lives and choices define our diet.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the author Terri Cheney. Formerly a successful entertainment attorney -- her clients included Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones -- Cheny now works as an advocate for destigmatizing mental illness.

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is Dr. Jonathan M. Berman, who tells us about his important new book. That book is "Anti-vaxxers: How to Challenge a Misinformed Movement." As was noted of this work by Publishers Weekly: "Science professor Berman debuts with a useful guide for readers concerned about the opposition to vaccinations.... The book's greatest value comes from its insights into how common cognitive errors can lead even the well-informed to see false correlations between vaccination and health problems.

It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we, as individuals, do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr. Aly Cohen is a board certified rheumatologist and integrative medicine specialist, as well as an environmental health expert based in Princeton, New Jersey.

On this edition of our program, we learn about bariatric surgery, also known as weight-loss surgery. Once thought of in strictly "cosmetic" terms, the procedure has become more common, and more applicable, in recent years. Indeed, bariatric surgery is now known to foster significant loss of weight, recovery from diabetes, and improvement in the risk of cardiovascular issues. Our guest is a faculty member at the OU-TU School of Community Medicine and a specialist in bariatric procedures, Dr. Robert B. Lim. Dr.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) What do we mean by the phrase "patient-centered care"? And why is this expression being used more frequently in medical circles? Our guest is Dr. Saul J. Weiner, a professor of medicine, pediatrics, and medical education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He tells us about his book, "On Becoming a Healer," which is essentially a med school-based memoir/study as well as a critique/guidebook focused on how to become a more competent, more compassionate physician.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the science writer Riley Black, who writes under the pen name of Brian Switek. Black tells us about her newest book, which is just out in paperback, "Skeleton Keys: The Secret Life of Bone." It offers, per The Wall Street Journal, "a provocative and entertaining magical mineral tour through the life and afterlife of bone." And further, per the journal Nature: "A thoughtful, engaging meditation on the origins of the human skeleton, how it functions (or malfunctions), and how we come to terms with our essential but unsettling osseous framework."

Should schools reopen? Should we be playing (or practicing) team sports right now? And which type of mask is the safest one to wear? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak about these and other matters with Dr. Bruce Dart, executive director of the Tulsa City-County Health Department. Dr. Dart, who last appeared on our show back in March, offers an update on COVID-19 in our community at present.

You're probably familiar with this routine -- you swab your cheek or spit into a vial, then you send it away to a lab someplace. A month later, you get a report explaining where your ancestors came from...or whether you carry certain genetic risks. But what implications does this very popular trend have for American life and culture?

There are many, many different skin-care products out there...and keeping skin healthy has long been a booming industry...but how did we get here? And why are there so many confusing messages from health experts regarding the care of our skin? Why are there so many ineffective treatments? Our guest is a preventative medicine physician and staff writer for The Atlantic whose new book explains the surprising (and often unintended) effects of our modern-day hygiene practices; his book also offers an introduction to the new science of skin microbes and probiotics.

(Note: This interview first aired last summer.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Adam S. Cifu; he's the co-author of an interesting book about "medical reversal" -- i.e., what happens when doctors start using a medication, procedure, or diagnostic tool without a robust evidence base...and then stop using it when it's found not to help, or even to harm, patients.

Our guest is Dr. Syeachia Dennis, who joined the OU-Tulsa family medicine residency program in 2013, and who more recently completed a master's program from the John Hopkins School of Public Health. An Oklahoma native, Dr. Dennis is an Assistant Professor in the OU-Tulsa School of Community Medicine's Department of Family Medicine. She joins us for a candid, local-level discussion about the racial disparities that exist today in American health care: troubling, long-running disparities in access, treatment, perceptions, and outcomes. Dr.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Jennifer Clark, a Visiting Associate Professor of Community Health at TU's Oxley College of Health Sciences; she teaches in TU's Health Care Delivery Science Program. Dr. Clark is also a contributor/commentator for the ongoing, thrice-weekly Project ECHO updates regarding COVID-19. These online, open-to-the-public updates, originating from Oklahoma State University and freely streamable, are medically-driven information sessions presented by a multi-institutional array of doctors and scientists.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in February.) Our guest is Dr. Adam Hill, who works in the Pediatric Palliative Care Unit at Indiana University's Riley Hospital for Children. He joins us to discuss his memoir, "Long Walk Out of the Woods: A Physician's Story of Addiction, Depression, Hope, and Recovery." As was noted of this book by Library Journal: "[Hill] shares a deeply personal story...in an effort to improve access, treatment options, and resources for all affected by similar conditions.

Our guest is Dr. Vinayak K. Prasad, a practicing hematologist-oncologist and internal medicine physician based in San Francisco. He joins us to discuss his important new book, "Malignant: How Bad Policy and Bad Evidence Harm People with Cancer." This work explains how hype, money, and bias can -- and often do -- mislead the public into thinking that many worthless or unproven cancer treatments are effective. As noted by Dr. David P.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Bon Ku, an ER doc and Assistant Dean for Health and Design at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Ku is also the co-author of a new book, "Health Design Thinking: Creating Products and Services for Better Health." This novel and fascinating work argues that the principles of human-centered design can and should be applied to today's health care challenges. The book's focal points range from the design of drug packaging and exam rooms to the use of internet-connected devices for early detection of breast cancer. As Dr.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Mikkael Sekeres, a leading cancer specialist who writes regularly for The New York Times. He tells us about his new book, "When Blood Breaks Down: Life Lessons from Leukemia." This work carefully examines leukemia in its different forms as well as the development of drugs to treat it.

Could dogs be used -- at some point in the future -- to effectively "sniff out" COVID-19 among human beings infected with the virus? We don't know. But research is now being done in various labs to explore this question. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we get an update from journalist Maria Goodavage, whose previous books include "Soldier Dogs: The Untold Story of America's Canine Heroes" and "Top Dog: The Story of Marine Hero Lucca." She actually spoke with us about six months ago, when her latest book was published.

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