John Henning Schumann

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Monique Tello, a practicing primary care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, an instructor at Harvard Medical School, and a published clinical researcher. She tells us about her book, "Healthy Habits for Your Heart: 100 Simple, Effective Ways to Lower Your Blood Pressure and Maintain Your Heart's Health." Dr. Tello also, as we learn today, writes for the popular Harvard Health Blog as well as her own GenerallyMedicine blog.

If you follow the world of sports and fitness, you might know that "recovery" has become quite the buzzword. On this edition of ST Medical, we're exploring the hype as well as the science behind various recovery products -- such as power bars, energy shakes, foam rollers, electrical muscle stimulators, etc.

Our guest is the science journalist, author, and editor Katherine Harmon Courage, whose new book -- which she tells us about -- is "Cultured: How Ancient Foods Can Feed Our Microbiome." What is the best way for us to feed, and to care for, our all-important microbiome -- and what is a microbiome, anyway? Courage investigates such questions by way of ancient food traditions as well as the latest research for maintaining a healthy gut. (Please note that Katherine Harmon Courage will do a free-to-the-public reading and signing on Wednesday the 20th at Magic City Books.)

Faculty and fellows participating in the HEAL Initiative in Hinche, Haiti. (UC-San Francisco)

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, an interesting discussion of global health -- that is, thinking about the health and well-being of the world's populations in a global context, and moreover, about how to serve those populations by improving care (and achieving equity of care) for all people. It's about seeing health care as a basic human right, and thus as something that people all over the world are fully entitled to. Our guest is Dr. Phuoc Le of the University of California at San Francisco, who also teaches in the public health program at UC-Berkeley. Dr.

Our guests are Mike Appel and Emily Oakley, the husband-and-wife team behind Three Springs Farm, a small but active organic farm in Oaks, Oklahoma (about an hour east of Tulsa). Mike and Emily are well-known for their long-standing gig at the Cherry Street Farmers' Market, where they sell their produce on Saturdays from April to September. They join us on ST Medical Monday for a detailed chat about growing and selling organic food -- and about, more generally, farming at the grassroots scale.

(Note: This program originally aired in December.) Our guest is Anna Leahy, director of the Creative Writing Program at Chapman University. She joins us to discuss her book, "Tumor." A brief yet thoughtful volume that is part memoir, part study, and part history, the book was thus praised by Prof. Kristen Iversen at the University of Cincinnati: "In clear, compelling language, Leahy writes with insight and empathy about cancer and the social and cultural dimensions of one of our greatest fears.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Jordan Greenbaum, a child abuse physician who works with victims of suspected physical and sexual abuse, neglect, and sex trafficking at the Stephanie Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. She also directs the Global Health and Well-Being Initiative with the International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children, providing training on all aspects of child maltreatment for medical and non-medical professionals all over the globe. Dr.

Where does Northeastern Oklahoma now stand, when it comes to HIV/AIDS care? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about Tulsa Cares, a local nonprofit that, per its website, is "committed to creating a community where all people with HIV/AIDS have equal opportunities for healthy living. We advance our mission through empowerment, inclusion, and the creation of hope by offering tailored, integrated resources and advocating for the end of HIV stigma." One of our guests is Kate Neary, the Chief Executive Officer at Tulsa Cares.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Monique Tello, a practicing primary care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, an instructor at Harvard Medical School, and a published clinical researcher. She tells us about her new book, which is just out from Adams Media: "Healthy Habits for Your Heart: 100 Simple, Effective Ways to Lower Your Blood Pressure and Maintain Your Heart's Health." Dr. Tello also, as we learn today, writes for the Harvard Health Blog as well as her own GenerallyMedicine blog.

On this installment of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a timely conversation with two community leaders who are both involved with the Tulsa Community Service Council, and who are both, moreover, U.S. Military veterans: Dr. Erv Janssen and Jim Lyall. They join us to define and discuss the experience known as moral injury -- an affliction that's similar to post-traumatic stress disorder, yet which also differs from PTSD in several important ways.

How did our nation's current opioid crisis come about? What steps were -- or were not -- taken as this epidemic was first being recognized? Who should ultimately be held accountable for this widespread tragedy? What policies enabled it, and who has benefitted most from those disastrous policies? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we feature a "live onstage" interview that host John Schummann recently recorded here in Tulsa with Chris McGreal, a senior writer at The Guardian and former journalist for BBC.

(Note: This program originally aired back in October.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Randi Hutter Epstein, M.D., M.P.H., who is an adjunct professor at Columbia and a lecturer at Yale. She joins us to discuss her book, "Aroused: The History of Hormones and How They Control Just About Everything." Per Publishers Weekly: "Science writer Epstein gives readers a lucid and entertaining look at the social and scientific history of endocrinology.

On this edition of our program, we offer an engaging conversatiuon with Deborah Hunter, a Behavioral Health Rehab Specialist and Case Manager at Family & Children's Services here in Tulsa. She's been with F&CS since 2011, and she is also a longtime and award-winning poet. Interestingly, Hunter also works as a social worker for the Tulsa City-County Library, mainly at the TCCL's Central Branch (and 5th and Denver).

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Teresa Carr, a journalist who wrote the cover story for the January 2019 issue of Consumer Reports. As this in-depth article (titled "Medical Screening Tests You Do and Don't Need") notes near the outset: "Today, as we've learned more about how to detect disease early, there are scores of blood tests, ultrasounds, and CT scans to screen for conditions like cancer and low bone density.

Our guest is Anna Leahy, director of the Creative Writing Program at Chapman University. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Tumor." A brief yet thoughtful volume that is part memoir, part study, and part history, the book was thus praised by Prof. Kristen Iversen at the University of Cincinnati: "In clear, compelling language, Leahy writes with insight and empathy about cancer and the social and cultural dimensions of one of our greatest fears.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dan Weissmann, a veteran radio reporter for outlets like Marketplace, 99 Percent Invisible, Planet Money, and Chicago's WBEZ. He joins us to talk about his new podcast, An Arm and a Leg, which focuses on the cost of health care in the U.S. Weissmann is the host and executive producer of this podcast, which just launched earlier this month. As noted at the Arm and a Leg website: "Health care -- and how much it costs -- is scary. But you're not alone with this stuff, and knowledge is power.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Judy Melinek, a board-certified forensic pathologist practicing forensic medicine in California's Bay Area, where she is also the CEO of PathologyExpert, Inc. Lately, Dr.

On this edition of our program, we're discussing a recent DHS-related proposal put forth by the Trump Administration as well as local efforts to challenge this proposal. The proposal in question would change the accepted ferderal definition of Public Charge, which is a term used by immigration officials to refer to certain legal immigrants who are able to receive government benefits like food assistance, housing assistance, and health care.

(Note: This show originally aired back in July.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Mike Scardino, whose debut memoir is "Bad Call: A Summer Job on a New York Ambulance." The book details his experiences working an ambulance job in Queens, New York, in the late '60s and early '70s. As per a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Fresh and powerful...Scardino looks back on his summers during college...when he worked as a New York City hospital ambulance attendant.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, as we re-air a special program which was first presented back in August, our guest is Laura Kenny. She's the President and Chief Executive Officer of LIFE Senior Services. You can learn more about this program -- and can access a free, on-demand audio stream of it -- at this link.

The nonprofit Clarehouse -- a home in Tulsa offering loving care for people in the last month of life -- is now presenting its annual Community Conversation Series. This series, per the Clarehouse website, is a multi-venue line-up that "advances the discussion about end-of-life care and wishes, opening our minds and hearts to dialogue about death and dying.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, an interesting discussion with Dr. Ira Byock, one of the nation's leading palliative care physicians. Also known for his work as a writer and longtime public advocate for improving end-of-life care, Dr. Byock will soon (as in, tomorrow night, the 9th) give a free-to-the-public lecture at the Cascia Hall Auditorium here in Tulsa on "What Mortality Can Teach Us About Living." His book, "The Four Things That Matter Most," is now out in a Tenth Anniversary Edition. Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Randi Hutter Epstein, M.D., M.P.H., who is an adjunct professor at Columbia University and a lecturer at Yale University. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Aroused: The History of Hormones and How They Control Just About Everything." Per a critic writing for Publishers Weekly: "Science writer Epstein gives readers a lucid and entertaining look at the social and scientific history of endocrinology.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about Susan G. Komen, the world's largest breast cancer organization, which funds more breast cancer research than any other nonprofit while also providing help, in a variety of ways, to those facing the disease. Tulsa's Komen affiliate, which began in 1997, will present its 22nd annual Komen Race for the Cure this coming Saturday (the 29th) as part of its ongoing effort to raise funds for, and care for, women and their families throughout Eastern Oklahoma.

Our guest is Dr. Geoffrey Chow, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery at the OU-TU School of Community Medicine. Specializing in General Surgery and Minimally Invasive Surgery, he joins us to preview a public lecture he'll soon give here in Tulsa on reflux. "Heartburn, Reflux, and Pills" will be delivered by Dr. Chow at the OU Physicians South Memorial campus on Thursday, September 27th. (The venue's address is 8005 E. 106th Street; the start time is 6pm.) Dr.

Medical Marijuana was approved by voters here in Oklahoma as recently as June of this year, yet so much is happening on this front -- medically, politically, economically, legislatively, etc. -- that it can be rather difficult to stay informed. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jackie Fortier, the StateImpact Oklahoma reporter who covers health and medicine for KWGS, KGOU, KOSU, and other public radio outlets across the state. Fortier brings us up to speed on the fast-moving, far-reaching story that is Medical Marijuana in Oklahoma.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in December.) On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we share an interesting if rather alarming conversation with the award-winning science reporter and author Gary Taubes, whose latest book is "The Case Against Sugar." As was noted of this book by The Seattle Times: "Taubes sifts through centuries' worth of data.... Practically everything one wants to know about sugar -- its history, its geography, the addiction it causes -- is here. In the end, each of us is confronted with a choice.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Laura Kenny, the President and Chief Executive Officer of LIFE Senior Services. For 40+ years, this vital Tulsa-based nonprofit has, per its website, "strategically grown to meet the emerging needs of an ever-increasing and diverse aging population. LIFE provides solutions that allow older adults to maintain their independence and live their lives to the fullest.

On this edition of our program, we learn about "The Bleeding Edge," a new documentary film that recently started airing on Netflix. This film, directed by Kirby Dick, offers a detailed and unsettling look at the unforeseen consequences of various advanced technological devices that are routinely used by Big Medical today. Our guest is the producer of this film, Amy Herdy, who has worked in film -- specializing in social justice issues -- for more than twenty years.

Our guest on this encore edition of ST Medical Monday is Dr. Barbara Lipska, Director of the Human Brain Collection Core at the National Institute of Mental Health, where she studies mental illness and human brain development. She joins us to discuss her engaging and disturbing memoir, "The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery." As noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "A vibrant mental health expert's bout with brain cancer and the revolutionary treatments that saved her life....

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