Psychology

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we present our third and final health-related installment of the popular Life Kit podcast from NPR, which is an ongoing feature presenting useful "how to" tips to listeners on various aspects of daily living. Our own John Schumann co-hosted a trio of medical-based Life Kit podcasts which originally appeared earlier this summer, and those are the three episodes we're sharing on our program (last week, the week before last, and today).

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Keele Burgin, an entrepreneur, activist, author, filmmaker -- and survivor. She tells us about her new memoir, which candidly documents her incredible personal story of self-preservation, self-discovery, and self-betterment. As was noted of this book by Jennifer Read Hawthorne, a bestselling author: "Keele Burgin is a living, breathing example of the triumph of the human spirit. The story of how she overcame the extreme abuse of her childhood is nothing short of breathtaking.

(Note: This interview originally aired earlier this year.) Our guest is Frans de Waal, a professor in Emory University's Psychology Department as well as the director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. He joins us to discuss his book, "Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves." Per The New York Times Book Review, the book is "game-changing.... For too long, emotion has been cognitive researchers' third rail.... But nothing could be more essential to understanding how people and animals behave.

(Please note: This edition of ST Medical Monday originally aired back in January.) Today we offer a conversation with two community leaders who are both involved with the Tulsa Community Service Council, and who are both, moreover, U.S. Military veterans: Dr. Erv Janssen and Jim Lyall. They join us to define and discuss the experience known as moral injury -- an affliction that's similar to post-traumatic stress disorder, yet which also differs from PTSD in several important ways.

(Note: This installment of ST Medical Monday originally aired last summer.) It's taken a while for this particular truth to sink in, but America finally seems to be waking up to it: People with mental illness don't need to be locked up -- they need to be treated. On this edition of our show, we speak with journalist Alisa Roth, whose book, "Insane," is a well-regarded and alarming exposé of the mental health crisis now facing our courts, jails, and prisons. As was noted  of this book by The New York Times Book Review: "Chilling....

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Lori Gottlieb, who tells us about her bestselling new memoir, "Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed." As was noted of this book by a critic writing for The New York Times: "Gottlieb's book is perhaps the first I've read that explains the therapeutic process in no-nonsense terms while simultaneously giving hope to therapy skeptics like me who think real change through talk is elusive." And further, per The Washington Post: "Who could resist watching a therapist grapple with the same questions her patients have

When we refer to "implicit bias" in today's world, we mean those unconscious stereotypes or automatic assessments that we all make -- all of us -- about people of a race, color, or background that differs from our own. What happens when implicit bias occurs among doctors, nurses, or other medical experts? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Jabraan Pasha with the OU-TU School of Community Medicine, where he is Associate Program Director for Internal Medicine and Faculty Director of Student Recruitment. Dr.

Our guest is Frans de Waal, a professor in Emory University's Psychology Department as well as the director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. He joins us to discuss his new book, the bestselling "Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves." Per The New York Times Book Review, the book is "game-changing.... For too long, emotion has been cognitive researchers' third rail.... But nothing could be more essential to understanding how people and animals behave.

Our guest is the bestselling young-adult writer Laurie Halse Anderson, who is widely known and appreciated for the brave manner in which she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Her novel "Speak," which first appeared two decades ago, was groundbreaking in this regard.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is a Wharton professor and tech entrepreneur whose new book examines how algorithms and artificial intelligence are starting to run just about every single aspect of our lives.

Our guest is the journalist Katy Butler, whose articles have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Best American Science Writing, and The Best American Essays. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "The Art of Dying Well." As noted by Dr. Lucy Kalanithi of the Stanford School of Medicine: "This is a book to devour, discuss, dog-ear, and then revisit as the years pass. Covering matters medical, practical, financial, and spiritual -- and, beautifully, their intersection -- Katy Butler gives wise counsel for the final decades of our 'wild and precious' lives.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Jordan Greenbaum, a child abuse physician who works with victims of suspected physical and sexual abuse, neglect, and sex trafficking at the Stephanie Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. She also directs the Global Health and Well-Being Initiative with the International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children, providing training on all aspects of child maltreatment for medical and non-medical professionals all over the globe. Dr.

On this installment of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a timely conversation with two community leaders who are both involved with the Tulsa Community Service Council, and who are both, moreover, U.S. Military veterans: Dr. Erv Janssen and Jim Lyall. They join us to define and discuss the experience known as moral injury -- an affliction that's similar to post-traumatic stress disorder, yet which also differs from PTSD in several important ways.

Our guest is Dr. Duane Bidwell, a  professor of practical theology, spiritual care, and counseling at Claremont School of Theology in California. He tells us about his well-regarded new book, "When One Religion Isn't Enough: The Lives of Spiritually Fluid People." This especially timely volume, named a Best Book of 2018 by Library Journal, looks closely and respectfully at the lives of people who embrace two or more religious traditions.

On this edition of our program, we offer an engaging conversatiuon with Deborah Hunter, a Behavioral Health Rehab Specialist and Case Manager at Family & Children's Services here in Tulsa. She's been with F&CS since 2011, and she is also a longtime and award-winning poet. Interestingly, Hunter also works as a social worker for the Tulsa City-County Library, mainly at the TCCL's Central Branch (and 5th and Denver).

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Judy Melinek, a board-certified forensic pathologist practicing forensic medicine in California's Bay Area, where she is also the CEO of PathologyExpert, Inc. Lately, Dr.

The Judy O. Berry Honorary Lecture Series is an annual symposium presented by the TU Department of Psychology; the series features topics related to risk and resilience in children and in families. This year's keynote speaker is our guest on StudioTulsa: Dr. Courtney Stevens is Associate Professor and Director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon.

Our guest on this encore edition of ST Medical Monday is Dr. Barbara Lipska, Director of the Human Brain Collection Core at the National Institute of Mental Health, where she studies mental illness and human brain development. She joins us to discuss her engaging and disturbing memoir, "The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery." As noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "A vibrant mental health expert's bout with brain cancer and the revolutionary treatments that saved her life....

On this encore edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is F. Diane Barth, a longtime psychotherapist based in New York City. She joins us to discuss her book, "I Know How You Feel: The Joy and Heartbreak of Friendship in Women's Lives." As was noted of this readable and useful study by Kirkus Reviews: "A psychotherapist offers advice about how to be, and keep, a friend. Barth, whose Psychology Today blog frequently focuses on women's friendships, draws on interviews with diverse women to examine the 'magical, meaningful, and surprisingly difficult' connections they make with friends."

Our guest is Karen Dills, the executive director of RSVP of Tulsa. The acronym officially stands for "Retired Senior Volunteer Program" -- and as noted at the website for this long-running non-profit: "RSVP serves as a one-stop clearinghouse to connect volunteers, age 55 and over, with meaningful community service. There is an RSVP match for everyone who wants to remain active in their local community.

The Blue Zones Project will present a series of events here in Tulsa this week, and so, on this edition of ST Medical Monday, we listen back to a Blue Zones-related interview from our archives. In 2016, we spoke with one Tony Buettner. Several years ago, Tony's brother Dan executed the original Blue Zones study, and then wrote a bestselling book about same.

Our guest is Allen Gannett, the founder and CEO of TrackMaven, a software analytics firm whose clients have included Microsoft, Marriott, Home Depot, Aetna, and Honda.

Our guest on ST is Dr. Sunil Aggarwal, who grew up in Oklahoma and is now based in the Seattle area. He's a medical marijuana expert who's also a clinical instructor at the University of Washington School of Medicine; his focus is on the use of cannabis in clinical practice, medical research, and education. Dr. Aggarwal holds degrees in medicine, medical geography, chemistry, philosophy, and religious studies. He'll be speaking in support of State Question 788 today (the 8th) here in Tulsa, and then he'll do so tomorrow (the 9th) in Norman, Oklahoma.

Neurobiologist and primatologist Robert Sapolsky has spent his professional life attempting to understand the underpinnings and science behind human behavior, studying wild baboon populations as well as the complex workings of the human brain. The professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University and MacArthur Foundation "Genius Grant" recipient is the author of several books on various aspects of behavior -- and his latest, "Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worse," seems like a summation of his knowledge on the subject.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Nicole Washington, who has worked in the past as both an academic and community-based psychiatrist, and who's now on the staff at Family and Children's Services here in Tulsa. Dr. Washington also operates a private practice dedicated to helping high-level professionals deal with a variety of emotional and mental issues.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is F. Diane Barth, a longtime psychotherapist based in New York City. She joins us to discuss her new book, "I Know How You Feel: The Joy and Heartbreak of Friendship in Women's Lives." As was noted of this readable and useful study by Kirkus Reviews: "A psychotherapist offers advice about how to be, and keep, a friend. Barth, whose Psychology Today blog frequently focuses on women's friendships, draws on interviews with diverse women to examine the 'magical, meaningful, and surprisingly difficult' connections they make with friends.

It's often noted that health care in America is changing quickly and dramatically -- and that it is, moreover, in a state of crisis -- but can the same be said for therapy? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Enrico Gnaulati, a clinical psychologist based in California.

(Note: This show originally aired back in October.) On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. John Bargh, a social psychologist at Yale who's widely seen as a leading expert on the unconscious mind. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Before You Know It: The Unconscious Reasons We Do What We Do." As was noted of this volume in a starred review in Library Journal: "Although the work [in this book] is girded with years of studies and research, humor and use of personal anecdotes keep the writing accessible.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a conversation with Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, the founder and CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness, which is located in San Francisco's Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood. A well-regarded expert on how childhood stress can lead to adult disease, Dr. Harris speaks with us about her new book, "The Deepest Well." We also learn about how and why Dr. Harris -- a pediatrician by training -- was the subject of a game-changing 2011 profile in The New Yorker Magazine.

Our guest is Dr. Daphne de Marneffe, a noted clinical psychologist in the San Francisco Bay Area who has counseled couples and individuals for decades. Her new book, "The Rough Patch," aims to help married people both locate and maintain a union that promotes compatibility between an individual person's development and the often relentless demands of a two-person relationship. As was noted by Booklist, this volume is "densely packed with de Marneffe’s extensive knowledge of human emotional development and the parent-child relationships that affect us from birth....

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