Stress

These are, as we all know, particularly anxious times; in this age of the Coronavirus pandemic, anxiety is clearly widespread. But what are the "good" aspects of anxiety? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Wendy Suzuki, a Professor of Neural Science and Psychology at New York University and a well-known authority on neuroplasticity. She joins us to discuss her bestselling new book, "Good Anxiety: Harnessing the Power of the Most Misunderstood Emotion." Per The Washington Post: "The book contains surveys and strategies to help people assess and even befriend their anxiety.

Our guest is Dr. Jillian Horton, a medical educator, writer, musician, and podcaster based in Canada. As an award-winning teacher of mindfulness, she works with doctors at all stages of their careers who are dealing with guilt, grief, burnout, frustration, and/or other professional pressures. Dr.

(Note: This discussion first aired back in March.) Our guest is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

Our guest on StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saray Stancic. In 1995, she learned that she had multiple sclerosis. By 2003, she was walking regularly with a cane, had stopped nearly all unnecessary physical activity, and was on several medications. Flash forward to 2010, when she ran a marathon.... How'd she do this? It didn't happen overnight, of course, but -- through a series of dedicated lifestyle changes -- it did happen. Dr.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dawn Mauricio, who's been practicing and studying vipassanā meditation since 2005, and who now works as a meditation retreat teacher. (You'll find her online at dawnmauricio.com.) She joins us to discuss her new book, "Mindfulness Meditation for Beginners: 50 Meditations to Practice Awareness, Acceptance, and Peace." As was noted of this book by Jack Kornfield, the author of "A Path with Heart": "[This is] an elegantly simple, wise, and practical approach to mindfulness.

On this newest installemnt of Found@TU, Dr. Elana Newman joins us for a timely, fascinating, and in-depth discussion. Dr. Newman uses her background as a clinical psychologist to explore how covering stories of war, tragedy, and disaster -- as well as increasingly becoming targets of violence themselves -- affects the occupational health of journalists. You can check out this free, on-demand podcast here.

Epiosde 11: Dr. Elana Newman

Aug 28, 2019

On this edition of Found@TU, which is our monthly interview podcast series in which University of Tulsa faculty discuss their research and why it matters, our guest is Dr. Elana Newman. She is the McFarlin Professor of Psychology and Research Director of the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, and she joins us to discuss her in-depth research on journalism and trauma. Dr.

Our guest is William Doyle, a bestselling author and TV producer for networks including HBO, The History Channel, and PBS. Doyle is the co-author of an important new education-focused study, which he tells us about. The book is called "Let the Children Play: How More Play Will Save Our Schools and Help Children Thrive." As was noted of this work by Michael Rich, an associate professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School: "Sahlberg and Doyle whack us in the head with the reality that 21st-century skills require old-fashioned learning as children.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a conversation with Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, the founder and CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness, which is located in San Francisco's Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood. A well-regarded expert on how childhood stress can lead to adult disease, Dr. Harris speaks with us about her new book, "The Deepest Well." We also learn about how and why Dr. Harris -- a pediatrician by training -- was the subject of a game-changing 2011 profile in The New Yorker Magazine.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, an interesting conversation with Dr. Justin Feinstein, who's a clinical neuropsychologist at Tulsa's Laureate Institute for Brain Research (or LIBR) as well as an assistant professor of psychology in TU's Oxley College of Health Sciences. Dr. Feinstein also directors the "Float Clinic" at LIBR, which studies how and why floating in a foot or so of water -- to which has been added more than a ton of Epsom Salt -- can aid those who suffer from acute stress, high-level anxiety, PTSD, and similar afflictions.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a fascinating conversation that we had in April of 2013 with the noted primatologist Dr. Robert Sapolsky. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Sapolsky (who's a professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University) about his popular book, "Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers," which is now in its third edition.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, an interesting and often surprising discussion with Dr. Pamela Wible, an Oregon-based physician who is the founder of the Ideal Medical Care Movement -- and who is also an expert on physician suicide in America. Indeed, Dr. Wible is an active writer, blogger, speaker, and advocate when it comes to mental health among doctors all over the nation -- from the trials and travesties of medical school to the stresses and demands of running a practice. As is noted of Dr.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Steve McDonald, an artist and illustrator from Canada, about his new book, "Fantastic Cities: A Coloring Book of Amazing Places Real and Imagined." It's a striking collection of highly detailed line drawings depicting aerial views of real cities from around the world, both genuine and fictional. From New York, London, and Paris, to Istanbul, Tokyo, and Amsterdam, this large-format "coloring book for adults" combines arresting cityscapes with rather mind-bending and/or kaleidoscope-like close-ups of architectural details of all sorts.

On this encore edition of ST, we listen back to a discussion from April of this year. At that time, we spoke by phone with the acclaimed science writer, biologist, and neuroscientist, Dr. Robert Sapolsky. He's widely seen as one of our leading experts on stress --- namely, on the ways in which stress affects baboons and other primates, and what this, in turn, tells us about the effects of stress on the human condition.

Our guest on this edition of ST is the acclaimed science writer, biologist, and neuroscientist, Dr. Robert Sapolsky. He's widely seen as one of our leading experts on stress --- namely, on the ways in which stress affects baboons and other primates, and what this in turn tells us about the effects of stress on the human condition. A professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University, a MacArthur "Genius" Fellow, and an author whose works include such popular books as "A Primate's Memoir" and "Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers," Dr.