Memoir and Autobiography

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Adam Hill, who works in the Pediatric Palliative Care Unit at Indiana University's Riley Hospital for Children. He joins us to discuss his new memoir, "Long Walk Out of the Woods: A Physician's Story of Addiction, Depression, Hope, and Recovery." As was noted of this book by Library Journal: "[Hill] shares a deeply personal story...in an effort to improve access, treatment options, and resources for all affected by similar conditions.

Our guest, Dr. Arthur Kleinman of Harvard University, is an acclaimed and influential scholar-writer on the topics of psychiatry, anthropology, global health, and cultural issues in medicine. He's also the author of "The Illness Narratives: Suffering, Healing, and the Human Condition," which has long been taught in many U.S. medical schools. Dr. Kleinman joins us to discuss his new book, a work of both memoir and scholarship that stems from the pivotal decade or so during which he cared for his late wife.

Our guest is our friend, Barry Friedman, the Tulsa-based writer and comic, who's also a longtime commentator for this public-radio program. His son, Paul, died a few years ago from a drug overdose -- at age 24. And while Barry was devastated by this tragedy, as any parent would be, he was not really surprised. Paul's death, as Barry notes in his new book about his son, had been foreshadowed for years. Barry joins us to discuss his moving, unsettling, and perceptive new book, which is meant not as eulogy but as an elegy. And as the writer Dave Barry has noted: "It's a wonderful book.

(Note: This show first aired back in July.) Our guest is Carla Rachel Sameth, a writer who teaches at the LA Writing Project (at California State University Los Angeles) and at Southern New Hampshire University. She joins us to discuss her new book, "One Day on the Gold Line: A Memoir in Essays." As Sue William Silverman, author of "The Pat Boone Fan Club: My Life as a White Anglo-Saxon Jew," has noted of Sameth's book: "Race, class, drugs, sexuality, otherness.... Twenty-first century American hot-button issues are on full display in this brave, gritty, unflinching memoir.

Our guest is the Kansas City-based poet and teacher Anne Boyer, who joins us to discuss her bold, well-written memoir of cancer.

Our guest is the Colorado-based writer and writing instructor, Joanna Howard. She grew up in the Sooner State, and her newly published memoir, "Rerun Era," looks back on her childhood amid the environmentally and economically damaged rural flatlands of Northeastern Oklahoma. The book interweaves her personal memories, her family's larger story and dynamics, and the various TV shows that they all came together to watch (and bond over) in the late 1970s and early '80s.

Our guest is the former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Samantha Power, who's widely known as a tireless human-rights advocate. She joins us to discuss her recently published memoir, "The Education of an Idealist." Later this month, on Tuesday the 29th, Ambassador Power will take part in an onstage conversation (and subsequent book signing) with Dr. John Schumann, President of OU-Tulsa, at Congregation B'nai Emunah.

Our guest, Dr. Arthur Kleinman of Harvard University, is an acclaimed and influential scholar-writer on the topics of psychiatry, anthropology, global health, and cultural issues in medicine. He's also the author of "The Illness Narratives: Suffering, Healing, and the Human Condition," which has long been taught in many U.S. medical schools. Dr. Kleinman joins us to discuss his new book, a work of both memoir and scholarship that stems from the pivotal decade or so during which he cared for his late wife.

Our guest is the journalist Sarah Smarsh, whose book, "Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth," is now out in paperback. It's a far-reaching account of her coming of age in smalltown Kansas that sharply explores matters of poverty, class, family, income inequality, Midwestern values, personal ambition, faith, womanhood, and other key social and economic concerns.

Our guest is Philip Mudd, former deputy director of the CIA Counterterrorist Center, who tells us about his new book, "Black Site." It depicts one of the most controversial and unsettling initiatives in American history -- i.e., the post-9/11 counterterrorism effort created and led by the CIA. Just after September 11, 2001, as we learn, the CIA evolved into a war-fighting intelligence service, constructing what was known internally as "the Program" -- a web of top-secret detention facilities intended to help prevent future attacks on American soil and worldwide.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Keele Burgin, an entrepreneur, activist, author, filmmaker -- and survivor. She tells us about her new memoir, which candidly documents her incredible personal story of self-preservation, self-discovery, and self-betterment. As was noted of this book by Jennifer Read Hawthorne, a bestselling author: "Keele Burgin is a living, breathing example of the triumph of the human spirit. The story of how she overcame the extreme abuse of her childhood is nothing short of breathtaking.

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) Our guest is the bestselling young-adult writer Laurie Halse Anderson, who's widely known and appreciated for the brave manner in which she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Her novel "Speak," which first appeared two decades ago, was groundbreaking in this regard.

Our guest is Carla Rachel Sameth, a writer who teaches at the LA Writing Project (at California State University Los Angeles) and at Southern New Hampshire University. She joins us to discuss her new book, "One Day on the Gold Line: A Memoir in Essays." As Sue William Silverman, author of "The Pat Boone Fan Club: My Life as a White Anglo-Saxon Jew," has noted of Sameth's book: "Race, class, drugs, sexuality, otherness.... Twenty-first century American hot-button issues are on full display in this brave, gritty, unflinching memoir.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Donna Thomson, who is a co-author of "The Unexpected Journey of Caring: The Transformation from Loved One to Caregiver." As was noted of this important new guidebook by Booklist: "Caregivers often sacrifice their own health and relationships to take care of loved ones, which is a big problem in the United States, where nearly 45 million Americans provide unpaid care to an adult or child with medical problems or chronic conditions.

(Note: This interview originally aired last summer.) Our guest is Kendra Taira Field, an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University.

In 2013, Dr. Ayaz Virji left a comfortable job at an East Coast hospital and moved to a medical facility in a small town in Minnesota; he felt personally driven -- indeed, he felt called -- to address the dire shortage of doctors in rural America. But in 2016, his choice to relocate was tested when the reliably blue and working-class county where he lived swung for Donald Trump. Leading up to and following Trump's election, Dr. Virji  was shocked to suddenly see his children facing anti-Muslim remarks at school.

(Please note: This edition of ST originally aired back in March.) Our guest is Mitchell S. Jackson, whose new book is an autobiographical collection of essays called "Survival Math: Notes on an All-American Family." As was noted by The Boston Globe, it's a "vibrant memoir of race, violence, family, and manhood.... Jackson recognizes there is too much for one conventional form, and his various storytelling methods imbue the book with an unpredictable dexterity.

Many of us living here in Oklahoma -- and indeed, living all over the nation -- are today both pleased and proud to affirm that Joy Harjo, the much-celebrated, 68-year-old writer and musician based in Tulsa, was recently named by the Library of Congress as the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States. A member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, Harjo is the first Native person to be selected for this honorable role. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a conversation that we aired with Harjo in 2012, when her well-regarded memoir, "Crazy Brave," had just appeared.

Our guest is Elliot Ackerman, the author of several widely-acclaimed novels who's also a former Marine; he served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. Ackerman joins us to discuss his new book, a collection of autobiographical essays called "Places and Names: On War, Revolution, and Returning." Per a starred review of this volume in Booklist: "[A] searing, contemplative, and unforgettable memoir-in-essays....

(Note: This interview first aired last October.) As a young black man, RJ Young grew up with a healthy distrust of guns, but when he married into a family deeply immersed in America's gun culture, he knew he would have to learn about them -- at least, to a certain degree. Today, the Tulsa-based Young (who works as a sports-radio host) is a certified NRA pistol instructor...yet he doesn't carry a gun.

(Note: This interview originally aired last fall.) Our guest is Linda Kay Klein, whose detailed and engrossing new memoir looks at the devastating effects that evangelical Christianity's purity culture has had on a generation of young women in America. Back in the 1990s, the widespread white evangelical Christian culture created a "purity movement" of sorts -- purity rings, purity pledges, purity balls, etc. Girls were seen by this movement as potential sexual "stumbling blocks" for boys and men, and any expression of a girl's sexuality could be judged as a corruption of her character.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we revisit an interview that first aired in April of last year with Dr. Daniela Lamas, author of "You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor’s Stories of Life, Death, and In Between." Per Publishers Weekly: "In this ruminative account of treating patients, Lamas, a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, analyzes how the critically ill manage life during and after treatment.

(Note: This interview originally aired last year.) What's it like to be an "ER doc" in America today? And how has that job changed in recent decades? Paul Seward is our guest. Now retired, he was a physician for nearly fifty years, and he spent most of those years working in emergency rooms. His memoir is titled "Patient Care: Death and Life in the Emergency Room." As was noted of this volume by Booklist: "Seward's engrossing and approachable memoir plunges readers into the unpredictable life of an emergency-room physician....

Our guest is the Oklahoma-based author, attorney, and legal scholar Walter Echo-Hawk.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we welcome Dr. Sunita Puri, who tells us about her "visceral and lyrical" (The Atlantic) new memoir, a book that delves thoughtfully and artfully into medicine and spirituality. "That Good Night: Life and Medicine in the Eleventh Hour" finds Puri telling her own story, as the ambitious American-born daughter of immigrants, as well as the story of her parents: what they did for her, gave to her, and shared with her.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Carol Haralson. A former citizen of Tulsa, she is an award-winning book designer now based in Arizona. She's designed several striking book jackets over the years, across a range of literary genres. And Haralson's now written a book of her own -- a blend of memoir, fiction, poetry, personal essay, and photography titled "At the Far End of O Street." She'll appear tomorrow night, Wednesday the 17th, at a free reading and signing at Magic City Books (beginning at 7pm).

Our guest is the bestselling young-adult writer Laurie Halse Anderson, who is widely known and appreciated for the brave manner in which she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Her novel "Speak," which first appeared two decades ago, was groundbreaking in this regard.

Our guest is Mitchell S. Jackson, whose new book is an autobiographical collection of essays called "Survival Math: Notes on an All-American Family." As was noted by The Boston Globe, it's a "vibrant memoir of race, violence, family, and manhood.... Jackson recognizes there is too much for one conventional form, and his various storytelling methods imbue the book with an unpredictable dexterity. It is sharp and unshrinking in depictions of his life, his relatives (blood kin and otherwise), and his Pacific Northwest hometown, which serves as both inescapable character and villain....

Our guest is the journalist Katy Butler, whose articles have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Best American Science Writing, and The Best American Essays. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "The Art of Dying Well." As noted by Dr. Lucy Kalanithi of the Stanford School of Medicine: "This is a book to devour, discuss, dog-ear, and then revisit as the years pass. Covering matters medical, practical, financial, and spiritual -- and, beautifully, their intersection -- Katy Butler gives wise counsel for the final decades of our 'wild and precious' lives.

(Note: This program originally aired in December.) Our guest is Anna Leahy, director of the Creative Writing Program at Chapman University. She joins us to discuss her book, "Tumor." A brief yet thoughtful volume that is part memoir, part study, and part history, the book was thus praised by Prof. Kristen Iversen at the University of Cincinnati: "In clear, compelling language, Leahy writes with insight and empathy about cancer and the social and cultural dimensions of one of our greatest fears.

Pages