Museum Confidential

"The key to the work up to this point" by Hilma af Klint (1907)

On this episode of ST, we offer another Museum Confidential podcast. (The podcast, now in its second season, is co-created twice a month by our own Scott Gregory and Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum.) This time out, MC learns about a special, much-discussed exhibition now on view at the Guggenheim Museum in New York. It's a remarkable series of works by the obscure yet visionary Swedish artist Hilma af Klint (1862-1944). The exhibit is titled "Paintings for the Future" and closes April 23rd.

Wikipedia

Less than 20 miles from Washington, DC, there's a place called Glenstone. It was founded by Mitch and Emily Rales and opened in 2006. Last fall, Glenstone took a big leap forward. But what, exactly, is Glenstone? It's an art museum, with 200+ acres of grounds. It's private. It's free. Kids and chewing gum aren't allowed, nor are taking pictures or using cell phones. What is Glenstone, as a museum, trying to do? Emily Rales, who also serves as director and chief curator of Glenstone, tells us all about it.

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For the #1 slot on his list of Top 10 Best Art Shows of 2018, New York Magazine art critic Jerry Saltz selected an exhibition at the Guggenheim by Swedish artist Hilma af Klint titled "Paintings for the Future."  He wrote, "The most magnificent sight in New York this year was the drop-dead first gallery showing of kaleidoscopically colored, structurally complex, completely abstract paintings made in the first two decades of the 20th century by [this] unacknowledged Swedish visionary.

The Savior

Jan 18, 2019

Art conservation. It's sort of a magic trick. But when you look closer, you find immensely talented people using skills and techniques passed down over generations alongside cutting-edge technology. On this episode of Museum Confidential, we chat with Julian Baumgartner of Chicago-based Baumgartner Fine Art Restoration. He's taken his family business into the 21st century by embracing new media...and has become a bit of a social media star in the process.

On this episode of StudioTulsa, we offer another installment in our ongoing series of Museum Confidential podcasts, which are created twice a month by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum and our own Scott Gregroy. This time out, we learn about The Underground Musuem in Los Angeles, which was founded just a few years ago and has grown considerably in terms of recognition, reputation, influence, and importance. Indeed, it continues to grow in all of these ways. Our guest is the director of this museum, Megan Steinman.

A “Letter from the General Manager” at the beginning of a new year is like the “Happy Holidays from Our Family!” letter you get from your third-favorite cousin (and just about as exciting): Heavy on the good stuff that happened to ME, light on the good stuff that happened to US.  Let’s change that, starting with…

The Underground Museum

Jan 4, 2019

Close your eyes. Imagine a museum. Chances are, we're all seeing variations on the same theme. Open galleries, high ceilings, a guard standing in the corner wearing a blazer. These are stereotypes, of course, but you see the point here. Museums DON'T have to be quite so stereotypical. One place that's trying to change how we interact with museum spaces is The Underground Museum in Los Angeles. We recently sat down with that museum's director, Megan Steinman.

Flick

Years ago, the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, Austria, began inviting artists to sift through its 4 million or so objects and then create exhibitions filtered through each artist's unique point of view. Recently, the museum asked filmmaker Wes Anderson and his partner Juman Malouf to jointly take on this gargantuan task. We speak with the Kunsthistorisches Museum's curator, Jasper Sharp, to learn how the Anderson-Malouf show (which closes in April of 2019) was dreamed up, put together, and more.

We're starting the 2019 Give & Take season with a special event you won't want to miss!

Ever wonder how a podcast is produced? Curious about the behind-the-scenes of a museum?  This is the event for you! It's guaranteed you'll learn something and have fun doing it! 

Join us for The Give & Take: Museum Confidential LIVE at Philbrook Museum Art, located at 2727 S Rockford Road Tulsa, OK 74114, on Wednesday, January 16, 2019  at 6:30 p.m. 

On this edition of ST, we offer another Museum Confidential podcast (which is a podcast co-created twice monthly by our own Scott Gregory and Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum). This time around, Museum Confidential speaks with author Mary Gabriel about her new and much-praised group biography, which digs deeply into the post-WII New York art world.

Ninth Street Women

Dec 7, 2018

Pulitzer Prize Finalist Mary Gabriel joins us to talk about her acclaimed new book, "Ninth Street Women." After WWII, when names like Pollock and Rothko were entering the American mainstream, five women dared to enter the male-dominated modern-art scene -- not as muses, but as artists. From their New York studios, where they worked, drank, fought, and loved, these women kicked open doors for themselves and everyone who came after. On this episode, we meet Lee, Grace, Helen, Joan, and Elaine. 

PHOTO BY LAUREN SILBERMAN

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we offer another edition of our ongoing Museum Confidential podcast, which is co-created twice monthly by Public Radio Tulsa and Philbrook Museum of Art. This time around, MC visits California's High Desert with its roving correspondent, Preston Poe (of The Preston Poe Show podcast). As we often say, there are many kinds of museums.... One of them is a tiny, refurbished photo-processing booth located in Joshua Tree, which is now dedicated entirely to crochet.

Photo by Lauren Silberman

On this installment of Museum Confidential, we visit California's High Desert with our roving correspondent, Preston Poe (of The Preston Poe Show podcast). As we often say, there are many kinds of museums. One of them is a tiny, refurbished photo-processing booth in Joshua Tree, which is now dedicated entirely to crochet. The museum's founder, as you'll hear, knows how to spin a yarn or two. And rightly so.

Legendary filmmaker and so-called "Pope of Trash" John Waters has a brand new project in his beloved hometown. On view through January 6, 2019, at the Baltimore Museum of Art, "Indecent Exposure" is the first retrospective of Waters' visual arts career, featuring more than 160 provocative photographs, sculptures, and video/sound works. We sat down to chat with him about the show, the 30th anniversary of "Hairspray," and a few other things.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're pleased to present another installment in our twice-monthly Museum Confidential podcast series (which is co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum and Scott Gregory of Public Radio Tulsa). This time around, MC chats with Bob Dylan Archive curator Michael Chaiken, who's based in both Brooklyn and Tulsa. He tells us how they're pretty much trying NOT to make a museum with the forthcoming Bob Dylan Center (to open in downtown Tulsa in 2021). At least, not a "museum" in the traditional sense of the term.

On this installment of ST, we offer another Museum Confidential podcast, which is a popular, twice-monthly production from Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum of Art and our own Scott Gregory (who's the Production Director here at Public Radio Tulsa). We hear from Dr. David Pilgrim, founder and curator of the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia at Ferris State University in Michigan. This museum was born out of his personal collection, one that began decades ago, when Dr. Pilgrim was growing up in Alabama.

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In our special Halloween episode, we step into the macabre with acclaimed writer Mark Dery, author of the new biography, Born to be Posthumous: The Eccentric Genius and Mysterious Life of Edward Gorey. Often called the “Grandfather of Goth,” Gorey (who died in 2000) influenced Tim Burton, Neil Gaiman, Lemony Snicket, and countless others. 

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We all scream. The Museum of Ice Cream (MOIC) is attempting to blaze a trail in the museum world. But sometimes that's a rocky road. First up, we chat with Madison Utendahl, MOIC's Head of Content and Social. And then, and for an entirely different take on the emergence of "Instagrammable" or "Pop-Up" museums, we call up Amanda Hess, Critic-at-Large at The New York Times. 

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we offer Episode 2 of Season 2 of Museum Confidential, the podcast co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum of Art and our own Scott Gregory. This episode contains an in-depth chat with Alexis Light, the Senior Manager of Media Relations and Marketing at The Frick Collection. She is that NYC museum's thought leader when it comes to public relations, marketing, and social media content.

This Old House (Museum)

Sep 14, 2018

This episode offers a chat with Alexis Light, the Senior Manager of Media Relations and Marketing at The Frick Collection. She is that NYC museum's thought leader when it comes to public relations, marketing, and social media content. Also in this pod, we begin an occasional feature called "At a Museum in America." Our far-flung, gallery-going correspondent for this new feature is one Preston Poe, an independent curator, artist, and songwriter who also hosts "The Preston Poe Show" (which you can access at prestonpoe.com).

The Bob Dylan Un-Museum

Aug 31, 2018

In our Season Two opener, we chat with the Bob Dylan Archive curator, Michael Chaiken, about how they’re trying NOT to make a museum with the forthcoming Bob Dylan Center.  We also talk about Chaiken's path to landing the curator position, about music and movies and more, and also, of course, about Mr. Zimmerman himself.

Hosted by Jeff Martin with Philbrook Museum of Art and produced by Scott Gregory with Public Radio Tulsa.  

On this edition of ST, with the long-running,multifaceted, and decidedly unorthodox "Museum Confidential" exhibit about to close (on Sunday the 6th) at Philbrook Museum of Art, we present another installment in the Museum Confidential Podcast series. Co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook and our own Scott Gregory, this podcast has been posting twice-monthly since the exhibition opened at the museum back in October.

The Museum Confidential exhibition at Philbrook Museum of Art, which closes May 6th, has done some remarkable things. It has allowed visitors to view an unprecedented number of never-before-seen works. It has given guests an opportunity to play curator, choosing art pieces they’d like to see displayed in the gallery.

On this edition of ST, we present another installment in the bi-weekly Museum Confidential podcast series, which is co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum of Art and our own Scott Gregory. This particular podcast explores the Rothko Chapel, established in 1971 in Houston, Texas. It's both a sacred space and a modern art mainstay. Dedicated to non-denominational prayer and private contemplation -- and also to international peace and fellowship -- the building routinely hosts lectures, concerts, interfaith gatherings, and similar events.

Museum Mail Bag

Apr 27, 2018

In this Season One finale, we try our hand at a podcast classic: the tried-and-true "mail bag" episode. We invited social media followers to "ask us anything" about Philbrook and/or museums in general. We then gathered a panel of experts to provide answers, or at least attempt such. Results vary. Comedy ensues. Interesting stuff as well.... See you this fall for Season Two!

 

 

The Rothko Chapel, established in 1971 in Houston, is both a sacred space and a modern art mainstay. Dedicated to non-denominational prayer and private contemplation -- and also to international peace and fellowship -- the building routinely hosts lectures, concerts, interfaith gatherings, and similar events. And at its heart, of course, are fourteen very dark, luminous, large-scale paintings by the late Mark Rothko. We speak with David Leslie, the executive director of the Rothko Chapel.

On today's edition of StudioTulsa, we are listening to another installment in the Museum Confidential podcast series, which is co-created by Jeff Martin (with Philbrook Museum of Art) and Scott Gregory (with Public Radio Tulsa). In this episode, writer and Philbrook staffer Mark Brown speaks about his in-depth profile of Eugene Kingman (1909-1975) -- the first-ever Director of Philbrook, who was also a versatile painter and cartographer -- which appeared in that museum's newsletter in 2016.

Let’s be honest, conceptual art is polarizing. Sometimes intentionally so. We explore this and more in a wide-ranging and fascinating chat with self-proclaimed Experimental Philosopher, Jonathon Keats. From his early childhood days selling rocks for a penny to large-scale thought experiments commissioned by prestigious institutions, his career is nothing if not unique. As described in the pages of WIRED magazine by science fiction author Bruce Sterling, “the guy is tireless.” 

In The Beginning...

Mar 16, 2018

On this episode we take an in-depth look at the very first Director of Philbrook, Eugene Kingman. An acclaimed artist in his own right, Kingman’s journey included stops at Yale, The Rhode Island School of Design, the offices of The New York Times, and the organization that would become the C.I.A. 

 We chat with Mark Brown, longtime journalist and current assistant to the current Philbrook Director.   

The Boston Globe

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to present another installment of Museum Confidential: The Podcast. This podcast -- the 11th in the series, and which is just being posted today -- is called "The Right to Fail: Getting to Know The Museum of Bad Art." It features an interesting conversation with Louise Sacco, the so-called Permanent Acting Interim Executive Director of MOBA (a/k/a The Museum of Bad Art).

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