Novels

(Note: This interview originally aired back in June.) Our guest is the novelist Jonathan Lee, whose latest book is a vivid, page-turning work of historical fiction titled "The Great Mistake." It's a novel set in 19th-century New York City that digs into the life and times of -- and the mysterious murder of -- a man named Andrew Haswell Green.

Our guest is the poet and fiction writer Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, who teaches creative writing and literature at OU. She joins us to talk about her new book, "The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois," which is a very well-regarded debut novel. As was noted of this work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "A staggering and ambitious saga exploring African American history.

Our old friend and colleague Nancy Pearl joins us on StudioTulsa to offer some can't-miss summer reading suggestions: fiction, non-fiction, poetry, memoir, and so forth. A bestselling author, retired librarian, and longtime resident of the Seattle area, Nancy (who's also a former Tulsan) has been making occasional recommendations to book-loving KWGS listeners for decades. It's good to hear from her again.

Our guest is the novelist Jonathan Lee, whose new book is a vivid, page-turning work of historical fiction titled "The Great Mistake." It's a novel set in 19th-century New York City that digs deeply and engagingly into the life and times of -- and the mysterious murder of -- a man named Andrew Haswell Green. Not well-remembered today but very famous in his time, Green (who was called "The Father of Greater New York") was a lawyer and city planner whose visionary deal-making led to establishment of Central Park, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Bronx Zoo, and the New York Public Library.

Our guest is Nancy Pearl, the well-known librarian, bestselling author, and former executive director of the Washington Center for the Book at the Seattle Public Library. She's also a longtime book reviewer for KWGS-FM / Public Radio Tulsa, as she used to live and work in Tulsa, decades ago, before relocating to Washington State. We're very pleased to welcome Nancy back to StudioTulsa; she joins us to recommend several books she's been particularly enjoying over the past (often quite solitary) year or so.

Our guest is Kevin Brockmeier, an imaginative and acclaimed writer based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Our guest is the writer Simon Han, who was born in China, grew up in Texas, and was formerly a Tulsa Artist Fellow. He joins us to discuss his novel, "Nights When Nothing Happened." As was noted of this tender, perceptive coming-of-age saga in a starred review in Kirkus: "Han expertly shifts the ground under the narrative, constantly shaking the snow globe to nudge the reader's perspective away from the familiar.... [The book's] characters are authentic, vulnerable, and utterly convincing, delivering one dynamite novel.

Our guest is the Tulsa-based writer, creative writing teacher, playwright, and performer, Michael Wright. He's had an active, far-flung career in the dual worlds of literature and theatre. The author of novels, plays, poems, and varous performance-art and spoken-word experiments, Wright was also the 2010 Playwriting Teacher of the Year for the Association for Theatre in Higher Education and the winner of the Kennedy Center 2011 Milan Stitt Award for outstanding teaching and professional work in playwriting.

Our guest is the British author Jenny Lecoat. She's just published her debut novel, which she tells us about. "The Girl from the Channel Islands" is a compelling saga that happens to employ, at least in part, her own family's history. As was noted by Publishers Weekly: "Lecoat...draws on the history of Germany's WWII occupation of Jersey, one of the Channel Islands, where [she] was raised. During the summer of 1940, Hedy Bercu is living on Jersey after having escaped Nazi-occupied Vienna.

Our guest is the writer Simon Han, who was born in China, grew up in Texas, and was formerly a Tulsa Artist Fellow. He joins us to discuss his new novel, "Nights When Nothing Happened." As was noted of this tender and perceptive coming-of-age saga in a starred review in Kirkus: "Han expertly shifts the ground under the narrative, constantly shaking the snow globe to nudge the reader's perspective away from the familiar.... [The book's] characters are authentic, vulnerable, and utterly convincing, delivering one dynamite novel.

(Note: This show originally aired last year.) Our guest is Julie Berry, the bestselling young-adult novelist. She joins us to discuss her latest book, "Lovely War: A Novel." As was noted of this work by School Library Journal: "The Greek gods relate the tale of how four young people's fates collide in a love story for the ages. Caught by Hephaestus in an compromising position with Ares, the god of War, Aphrodite is put on trial by her husband in a Manhattan hotel.

On this edition of ST, we present another installment in our Museum Confidential podcast series, which is a popular co-production of Public Radio Tulsa and Philbrook Museum of Art. This time out, MC speaks with longtime NYC-museum veteran Christine Coulson, who worked at The Met for a quarter of a century in a variety of roles. She left a couple of years ago to write full-time, and now comes her widely acclaimed and rather experimental debut novel: "Metropolitan Stories."

Our guest is Dr. Grant Jenkins, Associate Professor of English here at the University of Tulsa. He teaches creative writing as well as modern and contemporary U.S. literature, with a specialty in experimental poetry and poetics. Dr. Jenkins has just published his first novel, which he tells us about. "Ivory Tower" is an engrossing, genre-hopping crime thriller, set mainly on an American university campus. It's about a film professor who sets out to uncover sexual corruption within her school's football program. Please note that Dr.

Our guest is Terence Hawkins, whose second novel, "American Neolithic," was named a Kirkus Reviews Best of 2014. In a starred review, some five years ago, Kirkus called it "a towering work of speculative fiction." This book is now appearing in a revised, newly re-published edition, and Hawkins tells us about it on ST today. As the bestselling novelist Tom Perrotta has noted of this work: "A one-of-a-kind novel, a bizarre but gripping amalgam of anthropology, political diatribe, and speculative science fiction....

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome John Wooley back to our show. He's well-known for hosting the popular Swing on This western-swing program, which is heard Saturday nights at 7pm here on Public Radio 89.5 FM. He's also a prolific author -- of both faction and nonfiction -- with an array of interests and passions. Wooley joins us to discuss his newest book, just out, which he co-wrote.

Our guest on ST is Margot Livesey, the Scottish-born, Boston-based writer whose work has earned a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, the PEN New England Award, and the Massachusetts Book Award. She tells us about two of her books, "The Hidden Machinery: Essays on Writing" and "Mercury: A Novel." Of the latter, the New York Times noted: "Livesey knows her way around human desire and disappointment. Like the recent blockbusters 'Gone Girl' and 'Fates and Furies,' 'Mercury' gives us a marriage from alternating perspectives.

Our gust is Craig Johnson, author of the beloved and best-selling "Longmire" series of mystery novels. His newest book, "Land of Wolves," is the 15th novel to feature the Wyoming-based protagonist, Sheriff Walt Longmire. (These novels are also the basis, of course, for a popular TV series on Netflix.) Mr. Johnson will appear at a ticketed reading/signing event here in Tulsa on Thursday the 26th at the IDL Ballroom.

Our guest is E.R. Ramzipoor, a writer based in California. She studied political science at UC-Berkeley, where she researched underground literature in resistance movements -- and her newly published first novel, which she tells us about, grew directly out of this research.

(Note: This show first aired back in March.) Our guest is the Colorado-based writer Peter Heller, who tells us about his new novel, "The River." Per The Denver Post: "A fiery tour de force [of] poetic, staccato sentences and masterfully crafted prose.... The story itself resembles a trip down a river -- some parts are peaceful and allow for quiet introspection and big, deep breaths. But then you hit the rapids and the danger and risk jump off the page, forcing a sense of urgency. In those thrilling parts, reading required self-discipline.

"Lovely War: A Novel"

Aug 20, 2019

Our guest is Julie Berry, the bestselling young-adult novelist. Her writing has earned starred reviews from Kirkus, Publisher's Weekly, the Horn Book, and elsewhere. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Lovely War: A Novel." As was noted of this work by School Library Journal: "The Greek gods relate the tale of how four young people's fates collide in a love story for the ages. Caught by Hephaestus in an compromising position with Ares, the god of War, Aphrodite is put on trial by her husband in a Manhattan hotel.

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) Nathan Englander is our guest; he's the bestselling author of "For the Relief of Unbearable Urges," "What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank," and other books. He joins us to discuss his new novel, "Kaddish.com." Per a critic writing for The New York Times, this book is "sublime.... [It] reads like a modern-day Hasidic tale in which religious characters are bedeviled by the challenges of upholding God's word in an all too human world.... Kafka and Roth's influences are felt in Englander's work....

(Please note: This interview first aired last year.) Our guest is Vanessa Hua, a columnist at the San Francisco Chronicle, who joins us to discuss her debut novel, "A River of Stars." It's a powerful and moving saga of modern-day motherhood, immigration, and identity in which a pregnant Chinese woman makes her way to California (i.e., Los Angeles, and then San Francisco's Chinatown) in pursuit of the American dream.

(Note: This show originally aired back in February.) Our guest is the novelist Margaret Verble. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Cherokee America." Set on the American frontier in the spring of 1875, and specifically in the Cherokee Nation -- which would later be part of Oklahoma -- this novel follows a series of complex family alliances and cultural and racial clashes in the aftermath of the Civil War. It's a vivid (and often funny) novel of blood relations and home lands, of buried histories and half-told truths, and of past grief and present-day harm.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn all about the vitally important book/author/reading series known as Book Smart Tulsa, which was started ten years ago (pretty much single-handedly) by our guest, Jeff Martin. He worked for years as a local bookseller and is now the Communications Manager at Philbrook Museum of Art; he's also the co-creator of our popular Museum Confidential podcast here at Public Radio Tulsa.

Nathan Englander is our guest; he's the bestselling author of "For the Relief of Unbearable Urges," "What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank, and "Dinner at the Center of the Earth," among other books. He joins us to discuss his new novel, "Kaddish.com." Per a critic writing for The New York Times, this book is "sublime.... [It] reads like a modern-day Hasidic tale in which religious characters are bedeviled by the challenges of upholding God's word in an all too human world.... Kafka and Roth's influences are felt in Englander's work....

Our guest is the Oklahoma-based author, attorney, and legal scholar Walter Echo-Hawk.

The highly acclaimed novelist Rachel Kushner is our guest; she joins us to discuss her latest novel, "The Mars Room," which is now out in paperback. As was noted of this book (which was Time Magazine's #1 Fiction Title of the Year as well as a New York Times Notable Book of 2018) in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Two-time National Book Award finalist Kushner delivers a heartbreaking and unforgettable novel set in a California women's prison.

Each year, the Anne V. Zarrow Award for Young Readers' Literature is given by the TCCL's Tulsa Library Trust to a nationally acclaimed author who has made a significant contribution to the field of literature for young adults. This year, that award will go to Rita Williams-Garcia, our guest today on ST. She is being recognized, as noted at the TCCL website, "for writing bestselling novels for young adults that inspire imaginations, dreams, and pride in all ages.

"The River: A Novel"

Mar 11, 2019

Our guest is the writer Peter Heller, whose new novel, "The River," has been named an Amazon Best Book of March 2019. It's a fast-paced, thoughtful thriller about two friends on a river excursion in northern Canada. And per The Denver Post: "A fiery tour de force [of] poetic, staccato sentences and masterfully crafted prose.... The story itself resembles a trip down a river -- some parts are peaceful and allow for quiet introspection and big, deep breaths. But then you hit the rapids and the danger and risk jump off the page, forcing a sense of urgency.

Novelist Thomas Mallon is our guest. His latest historical yarn, which he tells us about, explores the George W. Bush White House. It's called "Landfall," and per The Wall Street Journal: "As in Mr. Mallon's many other novels, the writing is crisp and witty, the central characters complex and sympathetic in surprising ways, the narrative structure tight." And further, from The New York Times Book Review: "Entertainingly bitchy.... Smart and knowing and absorbing.... Extremely well-made.... The prose is a pleasure.... 'Landfall' is fascinating." Please note that Mr.

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