Nutrition and Healthy Eating

(Note: This interview first aired last year.) Our guest is Emily Contois, Assistant Professor of Media Studies here at The University of Tulsa. Her recently published book, which she tells us about, is "Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture." It is, per Library Journal, "a fascinating work of cultural studies that makes evident the continued power and threat of explicitly gendered food production and consumption in the 21st century.

Our guest on StudioTulsa Medical Monday is Dr. Monica Aggarwal, the director of Integrative Cardiology and Prevention at the University of Florida, where she teaches plant-based nutrition while also performing various mind-body techniques with her students and patients, including yoga and meditation. (You can visit her website here.) Dr. Aggarwal joins us to discuss her latest book, "Body on Fire: How Inflammation Triggers Chronic Illness and the Tools We Have to Fight It," which came out last year, and which she co-wrote with Jyothi Rao.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Saray Stancic. In 1995, she learned that she had multiple sclerosis. By 2003, she was walking regularly with a cane, had stopped nearly all unnecessary physical activity, and was on several medications. Flash forward to 2010, when she ran a marathon.... How'd she do this? It didn't happen overnight, of course, but -- through a series of dedicated lifestyle changes -- it did happen. Dr.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. T. Colin Campbell, who has been for more than four decades a leading expert on nutrition research in American medicine. His bestselling book from several years ago, "The China Study," grew out of the most comprehensive study of health and nutrition ever conducted, which he led. Dr. Campbell joins us to discuss both his pioneering career and his newest book, "The Future of Nutrition: An Insider's Look at the Science, Why We Keep Getting It Wrong, and How to Start Getting It Right."

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we're looking at the connections between diet, weight control, and health.

Our guest is Dr. Michael Roizen, the bestselling author and Chief Wellness Officer at the Cleveland Clinic. He's also the co-author of "The What to Eat When Cookbook," which is just out, and which builds upon a previous (and very popular) guidebook that he co-wrote called "What to Eat When." In both volumes, Dr. Roizen points out that **when** we eat (that is, what time of day) is actually crucial to the link between a healthy diet and healthy living. It's also crucial to disease prevention, better overall mental/physical performance, and a longer life. As Dr.

Our guest is Emily Contois, Assistant Professor of Media Studies here at The University of Tulsa. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture." It is, per Library Journal, "a fascinating work of cultural studies that makes evident the continued power and threat of explicitly gendered food production and consumption in the 21st century. [This book is] recommended broadly for students and scholars of fields related to gender, culture, and consumption." And please note that Prof.

Our guest on ST is Harold McGee, who writes about the science of food and cooking. His earlier books include "On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen" and "Keys to Good Cooking: A Guide to Making the Best of Foods and Recipes." He joins us to discuss his new book, "Nose Dive: A Field Guide to the World's Smells." As was noted of this work by Booklist: "In his detailed survey of scents, food writer and cooking scientist McGee elegantly explains olfaction....

A high-sodium diet can be a deadly diet -- high levels of sodium have been linked to high blood pressure, strokes, and heart attacks. And yet, salt is everywhere. It's all but inescapable on the American foodscape; salt (and plenty of it) is in packaged foods, fast foods, canned foods, table-service restaurants, etc. So...why hasn't salt received the sort of public attention and regulatory action that sugar and fat have? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Michael Jacobson, who set out to answer this question.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Benjamin Lorr, a writer based in New York City. He tells us about his interesting new book, "The Secret Life of Groceries: The Dark Miracle of the American Supermarket." As Lorr writes in the Introduction for this work: "This book is about the grocery store. About the people who work there and the routes of supply that define it. It is the product of five years of research, hundreds of interviews, and thousands of hours tracking down and working alongside the buyers, brokers, marketers, and managers whose lives and choices define our diet.

Our guest is Dr. Neal D. Barnard, a faculty member of the George Washington University School of Medicine who is also a bestselling author and president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Your Body in Balance." As was noted of this book by Dr. Robert Ostfeld, Director of Preventive Cardiology at Montefiore Health System in New York: "[This book] is an incredible resource. If you have ever wondered how the food you eat impacts your fertility, erectile function, thyroid function, skin, hair, and so much more, wonder no longer.

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Monique Tello, a practicing primary care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, an instructor at Harvard Medical School, and a published clinical researcher. She tells us about her book, "Healthy Habits for Your Heart: 100 Simple, Effective Ways to Lower Your Blood Pressure and Maintain Your Heart's Health." Dr. Tello also, as we learn today, writes for the popular Harvard Health Blog as well as her own GenerallyMedicine blog.

Our guest is the science journalist, author, and editor Katherine Harmon Courage, whose new book -- which she tells us about -- is "Cultured: How Ancient Foods Can Feed Our Microbiome." What is the best way for us to feed, and to care for, our all-important microbiome -- and what is a microbiome, anyway? Courage investigates such questions by way of ancient food traditions as well as the latest research for maintaining a healthy gut. (Please note that Katherine Harmon Courage will do a free-to-the-public reading and signing on Wednesday the 20th at Magic City Books.)

Our guests are Mike Appel and Emily Oakley, the husband-and-wife team behind Three Springs Farm, a small but active organic farm in Oaks, Oklahoma (about an hour east of Tulsa). Mike and Emily are well-known for their long-standing gig at the Cherry Street Farmers' Market, where they sell their produce on Saturdays from April to September. They join us on ST Medical Monday for a detailed chat about growing and selling organic food -- and about, more generally, farming at the grassroots scale.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in December.) On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we share an interesting if rather alarming conversation with the award-winning science reporter and author Gary Taubes, whose latest book is "The Case Against Sugar." As was noted of this book by The Seattle Times: "Taubes sifts through centuries' worth of data.... Practically everything one wants to know about sugar -- its history, its geography, the addiction it causes -- is here. In the end, each of us is confronted with a choice.

The Blue Zones Project will present a series of events here in Tulsa this week, and so, on this edition of ST Medical Monday, we listen back to a Blue Zones-related interview from our archives. In 2016, we spoke with one Tony Buettner. Several years ago, Tony's brother Dan executed the original Blue Zones study, and then wrote a bestselling book about same.

On this edition of our show, we learn all about Kendall Whittier, Incorporated, or KWI, which is a neighborhood-minded and long-running nonprofit now marking its 50th Anniversary. KWI is, per its website, "a home-grown organization incorporating self-sufficiency for our neighbors through food security, nutritional health, and well-being." KWI -- the only food pantry in the Tulsa area that actually delivers to its participants' doorsteps -- will host an event tonight (Thursday the 7th) in celebartion of its Golden Anniversary.

Our guest is Rob McKeown, a former food writer and food-magazine editor who's also done research and concept-development for renowned chefs and notable hotels and restaurants worldwide. He is the curator for "Botanical!" -- i.e., a series of fundraising events happening this weekend at Tulsa Botanic Garden.

Our guest is the Tulsa-based author Joe Johnston, who's originally from Missouri, and who's written many books over the years on various topics. He joins us to talk about his newest publication, a folksy, far-ranging, and conversational history of Southern cooking -- from sun tea and fruitcake and vegetables to "the Colonel's chicken" and BBQ and beyond.

(Note: This interview originally appeared in September of last year.) We offer a discussion about how what we eat affects not only our health and our mental state, but also our emotional disposition -- how food affects mood, as it were. Our guest is Dr. Leslie Korn, an expert in this regard. She's a clinician specializing in mental health nutrition and integrative medicine, and her newest book, just out, is "The Good Mood Kitchen." Dr.

Wait a sec -- is coffee good for you? Or bad? And what about chocolate -- should we avoid it, or does it actually have positive nutritional aspects? Tips about food can be confusing, as we all know, and things always seem to be in flux. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Aaron Carroll, who brings some stability (and sound advice) to these matters. Carroll is the author of a new book, "The Bad Food Bible: How and Why to Eat Sinfully." Dr.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, an interesting if rather alarming conversation with the award-winning science reporter and author Gary Taubes, whose books include "Why We Get Fat" and "Good Calories, Bad Calories." He joins us to talk about his newest book, which is just out in paperback: "The Case Against Sugar." As was noted of this book by a critic at The Seattle Times: "Taubes sifts through centuries' worth of data.... Practically everything one wants to know about sugar -- its history, its geography, the addiction it causes -- is here.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. James W. Mold, who recently retired from the faculty at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in OKC, where he'd worked since 1984. While there, Dr. Mold also completed a fellowship in Geriatric Medicine as well as a Master of Public Health degree.

On this edition of our show, we speak with Dr. Matthew Walker, a professor of neuroscience and psychology at UC Berkeley, where he directs its Sleep and Neuroimaging Lab. Dr. Walker joins us to discuss his new book, "Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams." As per The New York Times Book Review, this book is "a thoughtful tour through the still dimly understood state of being asleep.... [This] is a book on a mission. Walker is in love with sleep and wants us to fall in love with sleep, too. And it is urgent.

On this installment of our show, we chat with Aaron Sloan, who is the owner and head coach of The Engine Room, a gym based in Tulsa (with two different locations) which began as the Owasso Boxing Club in 2009. Aaron tells us about his Ready to Fight program, which he established just last year, as noted at the Engine Room website, "after a recently-diagnosed person with Parkinson's was referred to him by a doctor.

On this installment of ST, a discussion about how what we eat affects not only our health and our mental state, but also our emotional disposition -- how food affects mood, as it were. Our guest is Dr. Leslie Korn, an expert in this regard. She's a clinician specializing in mental health nutrition and integrative medicine, and her newest book, just out, is "The Good Mood Kitchen." Dr.

On this broadcast of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Chris Bernard, the executive director of Hunger Free Oklahoma. This nonprofit, per its website, "works to bring a unified, statewide voice to the issue and solutions surrounding hunger, with a goal to ensure all Oklahomans have access to affordable, nutritious food. Hunger Free Oklahoma holds the core belief that hunger is solvable, unnecessary, and unjust, and it impacts everyone living in Oklahoma.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we're discussing the cover story of the September 2017 issue of Consumer Reports: "Too Many Meds? America's Love Affair With Prescription Medication." Our guest is Lisa Gill, the deputy editor of Consumer Reports' ongoing prescription drug program, Best Buy Drugs. (For those not familiar: Consumer Reports is a non-profit, advertising-free, 80-year-old magazine...and now, website.) Just how hooked on meds are we Americans these days?

(Note: This interview originally aired in October of last year.) Our guest is Alex Prud'homme, who is Julia Child's great-nephew as well as the co-author of her autobiography, "My Life in France" (which was adapted into the hit movie, "Julie & Julia"). Prud'homme joins us to discuss his book, "The French Chef in America: Julia Child's Second Act." In this work, per a critic for Booklist, "Prud'homme deftly chronicles the years after Julia Child left France and settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts....

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we learn about the forthcoming Mother Road Market. As was reported last week by KWGS News, when the Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation announced that it would fund this market (to be housed in a empty warehouse at 11th and Lewis in Tulsa): "The Mother Road Market will be a community food destination, allowing Tulsans and tourists alike to eat, sip, shop, and enjoy Tulsa's favorite neighborhood restaurants and brand new food concepts -- all under one roof.

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